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Mid-late 90s era Pioneer 16:10.x TV?


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#1 of 8 OFFLINE   John Williams

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Posted June 04 2001 - 06:40 AM

Hi there!

Does anyone out there own a mid-late 90s era Pioneer non-HD RPTV with a 16:10.x aspect ratio? I think they made 53" and 61" versions of this set (I have the 61".) I don't have the exact model number on me, but will post it later today...

What I wanted to find out is if it is possible to adjust the set with a service menu to use the "vertical squeeze" trick, so I can watch anamorphic DVDs with full resolution.

I want to think Obi had one of these a looonnnggg time ago....

Thanks in advance!

-John Williams





#2 of 8 OFFLINE   Phil A

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Posted June 04 2001 - 09:20 AM

I have one that is about 4 yrs. old, 16:10.7 that is a 60 inch. They also made a 51 inch. Not sure of the model - think it is a Pro-119 and the 51 was a Pro-99 or something like that. Unfortunately at the moment it is sitting idle in the basement waiting for me to get moving to finish it - just a little more framing, plumbing rough-in is done and then I need electrical stuff. I have the owners manual but obviously can't try anything at the moment. If there is some portion that you need let me know.

#3 of 8 OFFLINE   Joseph Bolus

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Posted June 04 2001 - 10:27 AM

I own one of these ... Currently it's not my primary means of viewing DVD since I've acquired my projector.

Anyway, the short answer is "NO!" you can't adjust the set for anamorphic squeeze.

As I'm sure that you're aware, you do have access to a so-called FULL CINEMA mode which will eliminate the "black bars" for 1.66:1 through 1.85:1 transfers and make 2.35:1 transfers appear more like 1.85:1 transfers with this set. This circuit is employed after downconversion.

I've found that this mode is actually useful if you own a Sony DVD player, due to the way it provides anamorphic downconversion.

If I were you I'd purchase a Sony player and calibrate the Pioneer 16:10.7 set with Avia and/or Video Essentials for both the NORMAL CINEMA and the FULL CINEMA mode.

You'll probably discover that you won't need the "Squeeze" if you do this.

BTW, I generally operate my Pioneer in NORMAL CINEMA mode for 1.66:1 through 1.85:1 transfers and save the FULL CINEMA mode for 2.35:1 "non-actioneers."

That is, when I'm not using my projector!

Joseph

Joseph
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#4 of 8 OFFLINE   John Williams

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Posted June 04 2001 - 01:08 PM

Joseph,

Thanks for the tips, but I'm not sure I'm following you (not enough coffee today and all that.)

Are you saying that I should set my Sony S360 DVD for 16:9 output, and then use Full Cinema mode to de-squeeze the picture?

And in what way would my calibration be different for Full Cinema vs. Normal mode? I used VE for the original calibration in Normal mode....

Thanks in advance!

-John

#5 of 8 OFFLINE   Joseph Bolus

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Posted June 04 2001 - 05:20 PM

John,

I guess what I'm trying to say is :

* The Pioneer 16:10.7 set cannot be easily setup to provide the "Squeeze".

* You therefore need a player that can provide smooth, artifact-free downconversion. You have such a player with your Sony S360, which should be kept in its "4:3 LETTERBOX" Mode. As far as your DVD player is concerned, your Pioneer 16:10.7 set is simply an enhanced 4:3 monitor.

* Since you have good downconversion available to you via your Sony player, this will make your FULL CINEMA mode more useful; but you should calibrate your monitor/player combo specifically for this mode. If your set is like mine, you should be able to store multiple A/V settings in memory. Use one of these memory locations for your NORMAL CINEMA mode and another for the FULL CINEMA mode. By doing this you should be able to overcome the slight "softness" effect that is a byproduct of the Sony downconversion process. (Don't forget to calibrate your convergence for both modes as well.)

THE BOTTOM LINE is that since you own a Sony DVD player you would not see a huge increase in picture quality on this monitor even if you could do the "SQUEEZE". Just set your player to the 4:3 LBX mode, calibrate your monitor for both your NORMAL and FULL modes, and enjoy!

Joseph

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#6 of 8 OFFLINE   John Williams

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Posted June 05 2001 - 02:56 AM

Joseph,

That's pretty much what I thought...thanks for the update.

You know, I almost wish Pioneer (or someone) made HD-compatible 16:10.x TVs...it really is a good comprimise ratio between 4:3 and 16:9.

You could watch regular NTSC stuff with the full screen, and only have very very small black bars on pure 16:9 and HD material. Very little chance of burn-in either way, given the mix of source material available today, yes?



-John

PS: There's no such thing as a company out there that specializes in upgrades to RPTVs, is there? After all, the box/screen is fine...it's just the CRT and electronics that are out of date...



#7 of 8 OFFLINE   Phil A

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Posted June 05 2001 - 08:29 AM

John - if you find one let me know. I suspect that it may not be cost effective. I really like the 16:10.7 ratio. Pioneer has the most experience in the stretch modes and one can even see that comparing their current models vs. what else is out there. Since I have a Sharp 64 inch 16:9 in the main system and a Samsung 40 icnh 16:9 in the bedroom system, the Pioneer Elite will make a nice basement system TV with its conversion of 4:3 to 16:10.7 when I finish it. It looks very natural compared to the stretch modes on many TVs.

#8 of 8 OFFLINE   Joseph Bolus

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Posted June 05 2001 - 10:21 AM

quote:


You know, I almost wish Pioneer (or someone) made HD-compatible 16:10.x TVs...it really is a good comprimise ratio between 4:3 and 16:9.


I agree with you 100% on this. The default 4:3 stretch mode on the 16:10.7 set is outstanding. I've never felt the need to defeat it (which you can do, BTW, via the MENU TRIMMING control.) Sporting events broadcast in 4:3 look outstanding on this set in NORMAL CINEMA mode.

I'm also very impressed with the way this set handles LBX material. If you choose to stay in NORMAL CINEMA mode you will actually get more information on the sides than any 4:3 set can provide; even if the 4:3 set has been set up for zero overscan.

It's a great compromise aspect ratio and it certainly makes more sense than a 4:3 HDTV set. (Quite frankly, I can't understand why anybody would purchase a 4:3 HDTV, but that's just me.)

I was so spoiled by this set that when it came time to purchase my Widescreen display, I found that I couldn't live with any of the provided 4:3 stretch modes on the 16:9 sets. That's one of the reasons that I chose to purchase a projector instead (and kept the Pioneer 16:10.7 set to boot).

Joseph

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