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More Directors - Overlooked/Promising International Filmmakers Series


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#1 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 11:34 AM

Jacques Audiard

Quote:
Date of birth (location)
30 April 1952
Paris, France

Born in Paris, France, in 1952. Jacques Audiard's family has always been involved in movie business. His father, Michel, was a popular screenwriter and director and his uncle a producer. But in his teens he refused that world and wanted to be a teacher. He studied literature and philosophy at the Sorbonne but didn't finish his degree. By that time, his then girlfriend suggested he work as a trainee editor during his university holidays. He worked as an assistant editor on several movies like "Le locataire" (1976) directed by Roman Polanski.

He also joined a theater where he did all kinds of work. He specially enjoyed adapting works for stage. In the eighties he wrote the screenplays of some successful movies like "Mortelle Randonnee" (1983), "Reveillon Chez Bob" (1984), "Saxo" (1987), "Frequence meurtre" (1988) and "Grosse fatigue" (1994). Most of those films were thrillers directed by prestigious filmmakers like Claude Miller and Michel Blanc. He also directed some well received short movies.

Thanks to the success of those movies he was able, in 1994, to raise up the money to make his first movie "Regarde les hommes tomber" a somber road movie starred by two of the most important French actors: Mathieu Kassovitz and Jean Louis Trintignant. That movie won 3 Cesars of the French academy for best editing, best new director (Jacques Audiard) and best new actor (for Kassovitz).

Kassovitz also became the star of his second movie "Un heros tres discret" released in the Festival de Cannes in 1996 where it won the award for best screenplay. "Un heros tres discret" undermined the myth of the French resistance to the Nazis by telling the story of a young impostor who rises high in French society after World war by concocting a past for himself as a hero. It also won awards in the festivals of Stockholm and Valladolid and made his name internationally.

In 2001 he made his third movie "Sur mes levres". The love story between two outsiders (a deaf office worker and a hoodlum) who decide to con a group of gangsters also became a success. It also won three Cesars (best actress, sound and screenplay).

His last movie, "De battre mon Coeur sest arrête" (a remake of "Fingers" a James Toback´s movie) was released in the Berlin festival of 2005.

With those movies, Audiard has become the new master of the "polar" (French thriller) and inheritor of others great French directors like Jean-Pierre Melville (1917-1973) and Henri Georges-Clouzot (1907-1977).

Director - filmography

# Disparus, Les (2006) (pre-production)

# De battre mon coeur s'est arrêté (2005)
... aka The Beat That My Heart Skipped
# Sur mes lèvres (2001)
... aka Read My Lips (International: English title)

# Norme française (1998)
# Un héros très discret (1996)
... aka A Self-Made Hero
# Regarde les hommes tomber (1994)
... aka See How They Fall


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#2 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 11:38 AM

Jacques Audiard

Read My Lips (2001) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

[Now I regret my decision for skipping to watch TBTMHS when am in NYC. We watched Broadway's The Phantom of the Opera and Sweet Charity instead when we were there.]

#3 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 11:45 AM

Miranda July


Quote:
Date of birth (location)
February 1974
Barre, Vermont, USA

Filmmaker Magazine rated her #1 in their "25 New Faces of Indie Film" in 2004!

She is a performance artist and published short story writer. Since becoming a filmmaker, her debut feature, Me and You and Everyone We Know (2005) has won several film awards.


Director - filmography

1. Nest of Tens (2005)
2. Me and You and Everyone We Know (2005)


#4 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 11:46 AM

Miranda July

Me and You and Everyone We Know (2005) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#5 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 11:53 AM

Gaspar Noe

Quote:
Date of birth (location)
27 December 1963
Argentina


Director - filmography
(2000s) (1990s)

1. Irréversible (2002)
... aka Irreversible (International: English title)

2. Seul contre tous (1998)
... aka I Stand Alone (USA)
... aka One Against All (literal English title)
3. Sodomites (1998)
4. Une expérience d'hypnose télévisuelle (1995) (TV)
5. Carne (1991)



#6 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 11:54 AM

Gaspar Noe

Irreversible (2002) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image / 5

#7 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 11:56 AM

Shane Carruth


Director - filmography

1. Primer (2004)


#8 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 11:56 AM

Shane Carruth

Primer (2004) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#9 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 11:59 AM

Sofia Coppola
Quote:
Date of birth (location)
14 May 1971
New York, New York, USA
Birth name
Sofia Carmina Coppola
Height
5' 5½" (1.66 m)
Spouse
Spike Jonze (26 June 1999 - 9 December 2003) (divorced)
Trivia

Cousin of Jason Schwartzman.

Daughter of director Francis Ford Coppola.

Cousin of Nicolas Cage.

Her film debut: as the baby (boy!) in the christening scene toward the climax of The Godfather (1972).

Designer for street fashion label Milkfed, which she calls "a small t-shirt company"

Replaced Winona Ryder in the role of Mary Corleone in The Godfather: Part III (1990).

Sister of Roman Coppola.

Is the third woman in history to be nominated for a Best Director Academy Award.

In 2004, she became the first American woman ever nominated for best director Oscar. The two other past Oscar nominees were Jane Campion who is a New Zealander and Lina Wertmüller who is Italian.

Sofia and her ex-husband Spike Jonze have both received Oscar nominations for Best Director, having been the first married couple to do so.

With her 2004 Oscar win for screen writing, she joined her family, The Coppolas, to becoming the second family to have Oscar winners in three generations with her father, Francis Ford Coppola, grandfather, Carmine Coppola, and cousin, Nicolas Cage, all winners. The first family is the Hustons - Anjelica Huston, John Huston and Walter Huston.

A friendship of many years with Quentin Tarantino blossomed into a serious relationship recently following Sofia's separation from her husband, Spike Jonze.

Is one of a select few who has won both an Academy Award and a Razzie.

Niece of Talia Shire

Studied photography at Mills College in Oakland, California, just east of San Francisco, and painting at the California Institute of the Arts (Cal-Arts) in Valencia, California, just north of Los Angeles.

She was one of the cast members who were involved in all three of The Godfather films, along with Al Pacino . She played as the christened baby in The Godfather (1972), as a child on a steamboat in _The Godfather II (1974)_ , and eventually as Mary Corleone in _The Godfather III (1990)_ . Nevertheless, her appearances in the first and second movie were left uncredited.

Designer Marc Jacobs named a bag after her: The Sofia Bag


Director - filmography

1. Marie-Antoinette (2006) (post-production)

2. Lost in Translation (2003)

3. The Virgin Suicides (1999)
... aka Sofia Coppola's the Virgin Suicides (USA: complete title)
4. Lick the Star (1998)



#10 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 12:00 PM

Sofia Coppola

Lost in Translation (2003) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image / 5
The Virgin Suicides (1999) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#11 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 12:04 PM

Cedric Kahn
Quote:
Date of birth (location)
17 June 1966

Trivia

President of jury La Femis 2001

Director - filmography

1. Avion, L' (2005)
2. Feux rouges (2004)
... aka Red Lights (International: English title) (USA: literal English title)
3. Roberto Succo (2001)

4. Ennui, L' (1998)
... aka Tédio, O (Portugal)
5. Culpabilité zéro (1996) (TV)
... aka Zero Guilt (USA)
6. Trop de bonheur (1994)
... aka Bonheur (France: TV title)
... aka Too Much Happiness
7. "Tous les garçons et les filles de leur âge" (1994) (mini) TV Series (segment "Bonheur")
8. Bar des rails (1991)
... aka Railway Bar
9. Dernières heures du millénaire, Les (1990)



#12 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 12:05 PM

Cedric Kahn

Red Lights (2004) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#13 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 12:12 PM

Jean-Paul Rappeneau

Quote:
Date of birth (location)
8 April 1932
Auxerre, Yonne, Bourgogne, France

He directed 9 different actors in César-nominated performances: Catherine Deneuve, Gérard Depardieu, Jacques Weber, Anne Brochet, Vincent Perez, Juliette Binoche, Isabelle Carré , Grégori Derangère and Yvan Attal. Depardieu, Weber and Derangère won Césars for their performances in one of Rappeneau movies.

Member of the jury at the Cannes Film Festival in 1991


Director - filmography

1. Bon voyage (2003)

2. Hussard sur le toit, Le (1995)
... aka The Horseman on the Roof (USA)
3. Cyrano de Bergerac (1990)

4. Tout feu, tout flamme (1982)
... aka All Fired Up

5. Sauvage, Le (1975)
... aka Call Me Savage (UK)
... aka Lovers Like Us
... aka Mio uomo è un selvaggio, Il (Italy)
... aka The Savage
6. Mariés de l'an II, Les (1971)
... aka Mirii anului II (Romania)
... aka Scoundrel (UK)
... aka Sposi dell'anno secondo, Gli (Italy)
... aka The Scarlet Buccaneer
... aka The Swashbuckler

7. Vie de château, La (1966)
... aka A Matter of Resistance (USA)
... aka Gracious Living

8. Chronique provinciale (1958)





#14 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 12:14 PM

Jean-Paul Rappeneau

Bon voyage (2003) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image
The Horseman on the Roof (1995) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image / 4

#15 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 12:18 PM

Isao Takahata
Quote:

Date of birth (location)
29 October 1935
Mie, Japan


Director - filmography

1. Houhokekyo tonari no Yamada-kun (1999)
... aka My Neighbors the Yamadas (USA: literal English title)
2. Heisei tanuki gassen pompoko (1994)
... aka Pom Poko
... aka The Raccoon War
3. Omohide poro poro (1991)
... aka Memories of Teardrops
... aka Memories of Yesterday
... aka Only Yesterday

4. Hotaru no haka (1988)
... aka Grave of the Fireflies (USA)
... aka Tombstone for Fireflies (USA)
... aka Tombstone for the Fireflies (Australia: dubbed version)
5. Yanagawa horiwari monogatari (1987)
... aka The Story of Yanagawa's Canals
6. Sero hiki no Gôshu (1982)
... aka Gauche the Cellist (Japan: English title)
... aka Goshu the Cellist
7. "Jarinko Chie" (1981) TV Series

8. "Akage no An" (1979) TV Series
... aka Anne of Green Gables
9. "Mirai shônen Conan" (1978) TV Series (episodes 9, 10)
... aka Future Boy Conan
... aka The Adventures of Adnan and Lena
10. "Haha wo tazunete sanzenri" (1976) TV Series
... aka 3000 Leagues in Search of Mother
11. "Arupusu no shôjo Haiji" (1974) TV Series
... aka Heidi (West Germany)
... aka Heidi: Girl of the Alps
12. Panda kopanda amefuri saakasu no maki (1973)
13. Panda kopanda (1972)
... aka Panda! Go Panda! (USA)
... aka Panda, Little Panda
14. "Rupan sansei" (1971) TV Series
... aka Lupin III

15. Taiyo no oji: Horusu no daiboken (1968)
... aka Little Norse Prince (USA: TV title)
... aka Prince of the Sun: The Great Adventure of Horus
16. "Okami shônen Ken" (1963) TV Series


#16 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 12:19 PM

Isao Takahata

Grave of the Fireflies (1988) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#17 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 12:24 PM

Abbas Kiarostami

Quote:
Date of birth (location)
22 June 1940
Teheran, Iran

Abbas Kiarostami was born in Theran, Iran in 1940. He graduated with a degree in fine arts, before starting work as a graphic designer, (commercial use of film and TV), then joined the Centre for intellectual development for children and young adults where he started a film section, this started his career as a filmmaker at the age of 30, he has continued to make many movies and become the biggest Iranian film figure out. But not only, Abbas is also an incredible figure in the arts world as he creates art gallery installations based of photography, short films, and poetry. He is an iconic figure for what he has done, and has achieved it all in believing in the arts and creativity of his mind.


Director - filmography

1. Tickets (2005)
2. 10 on Ten (2004)
3. Five Dedicated to Ozu (2003)
... aka Five
4. Ten (2002)
... aka Ten (France)
5. ABC Africa (2001)

6. Bad ma ra khahad bord (1999)
... aka The Wind Will Carry Us (Canada: English title) (USA)
... aka Vent nous emportera, Le (France)
7. Ta'm e guilass (1997)
... aka A Taste of Cherry (USA)
... aka Goût de la cerise, Le (France)
... aka Taste of Cherry (USA: DVD box title)
8. Lumière et compagnie (1996)
... aka Lumière and Company (International: English title)
... aka Lumiere y compañía (Spain)
9. À propos de Nice, la suite (1995) (segment "Repérages")
10. Zire darakhatan zeyton (1994) (segment "Through the Olive Trees")
... aka Through the Olive Trees
... aka Under the Olive Trees
11. Zendegi va digar hich (1991)
... aka And Life Goes on...
... aka Life, and Nothing More... (USA)
12. Nema-ye Nazdik (1990)
... aka Close Up

13. Mashgh-e Shab (1989)
... aka Homework
14. Khane-ye doust kodjast? (1987)
... aka Where Is the Friend's Home?
15. Avaliha (1984)
... aka First Graders
16. Dandan Dard (1983)
... aka Toothache
17. Hamshahri (1983)
... aka Fellow Citizen
18. Hamsarayan (1982)
... aka The Chorus
19. Be Tartib ya Bedoun-e Tartib (1981)
... aka Orderly or Unorderly
... aka Regularly or Irregularly
20. Behdasht-e Dandan (1980)
... aka Dental Hygiene

21. Ghazieh-e Shekl-e Aval, Ghazieh-e Shekl-e Dou Wom (1979)
... aka First Case, Second Case
22. Rah Hal-e Yek (1978)
... aka Solution No. 1
23. Az Oghat-e Faraghat-e Khod Chegouneh Estefadeh Konim? (1977)
... aka How to Make Use of Our Leisure Time?
24. Bozorgdasht-e mo'Allem (1977)
... aka Tribute to the Teachers
25. Gozaresh (1977)
... aka The Report
26. Lebassi Baraye Arossi (1976)
... aka A Suit for Wedding
27. Rangha (1976)
... aka The Colours
28. Dow Rahehal Baraye yek Massaleh (1975)
... aka Two Solutions for One Problem
29. Man ham Mitoumam (1975)
... aka So I Can
30. Mossafer (1974)
... aka The Traveller
31. Tadjrebeh (1973)
... aka The Experience
32. Zang-e Tafrih (1972)
... aka The Breaktime
33. Nan va Koutcheh (1970)
... aka The Bread and Alley




#18 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 12:26 PM

Abbas Kiarostami

The Wind Will Carry Us (1999) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image
A Taste of Cherry (1997) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#19 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 01:35 PM

Robert J. Flaherty
Quote:
Date of birth (location)
16 February 1884
Iron Mountain, Michigan, USA
Date of death (details)
23 July 1951
Brattleboro, Vermont, USA. (cerebral thrombosis)
Trivia

An explorer for Sir William Mackenzie's Canadian railroad, he mined for ore and mapped areas in Hudson Bay, including founding of Flaherty island in the Belcher archipelago, some 70 kilometers long, 40 kilometers wide.

Film was sponsored by French fur company Revillon Freres which provided $50,000 for Flaherty's 16-month expedition halfway to the North Pole. Depsite being rejected by five distributors, the film opened in New York City in 1922, after its success in Paris and Berlin, and grossed well over $40,000 in its first week.

Upon his death in 1951, poet e.e. cummings called him "a god among man," and Orson Welles compared him to Thoreau & Walt Whitman, describing him as "one of the two or three greatest people who ever worked in the medium."

Attended Upper Canada College in Toronto and the Michigan College of Mines back in his home state, where he met future wife Frances who shared his interest in music.

Didn't take up film seriously until the age of 38, but in 1948, NY Times writer J. Donald Adams called Flaherty the "only creative genius yet to appear" in cinematography.

Though he had traveled the world, his home in Vermont, Black Mountain Farm, had a Celtic motto above the fireplace meaning "Wander No More."

Reportedly, in shooting Moana (1926), he was the first director/cinematographer to use panchromatic film stock, rather than the standard orthochromatic stock, in a full-length feature film.

Eldest of six children of Robert and Susan Flaherty, who moved the family to north west Ontario, Canada when Robert was 13 years old.

Tells the story of his making of "Nanook" documentary in book "My Eskimo Friends" (1924).

Biography in: John Wakeman, editor. "World Film Directors, Volume One, 1890-1945". Pages 330-345. New York: The H.W. Wilson Company, 1987.
Personal quotes

"A film is the longest distance between two points."
Biography from Leonard Maltin's Movie Encyclopedia:

Sometimes called "the father of the motion-picture documentary," this enterprising filmmaker was at least as much showman as documentarian. Nonetheless, he deserves credit for his pioneering; he was the first to bring movie cameras to some of the world's most inac cessible places, at considerable risk to his comfort and, sometimes, his health. Born to a prospector, Flaherty spent much of his youth in the American West in search of gold. His youthful travels nurtured a lifelong yearning for exploration and a profound curiosity about other peoples and civilizations.

While traipsing around the Hudson Bay area of northern Canada in 1913, Flaherty took moving pictures of the Eskimo natives, most of which were lost in a fire later on. It took him several years to raise the money, but in 1920 he persuaded wealthy investors to back another expedition, this time with more sophisticated camera equipment. He was able to persuade an Eskimo family to let him film their daily routines, which were later edited into Nanook of the North (1922), a ground-breaking success both critically and commercially. Even then, Flaherty was stretching the truth: For one sequence he constructed half of an igloo shell and persuaded Nanook and his family to pantomime occurrences that had taken place earlier in cramped surroundings into which the director couldn't bring his camera. (Tragically, the film's Eskimo protagonist died of starvation shortly after the film's release.)

Nanook's success prompted Paramount's Jesse L. Lasky to finance a Flaherty expedition to the South Seas. After nearly 20 months, the documentarian came back with miles of footage detailing Polynesian island life. But Moana (1926) got into trouble with critics and experts who realized that the filmmaker had tinkered with reality just a little too much; although the film contained many beautiful scenes, it was judged to be inaccurate in many details. It also flopped at the box office, ending Flaherty's autonomous filmmaking career.

Nonetheless, Hollywood respected Flaherty's expertise and passion. He was assigned by MGM to codirect White Shadows of the South Seas (1928) with studio workhorse W. S. Van Dyke, but he fought incessantly with his collaborator and quit the production in midstream. His collaboration with F. W. Murnau ended similarly, with the German director buying out Flaherty's financial interest in Tabu (1931), another South Seas story, prior to release. Man of Aran (1934) covered the life of an island fisherman off the coast of Ireland, and restored Flaherty's reputation as a serious documentarian, but Elephant Boy (1937), which he codirected with Zoltan Korda, was out-and-out fiction, albeit with a keen sense of verisimilitude owing to extensive location shooting in India.

Flaherty's final film, Louisiana Story (1948, made for the Standard Oil Company), told the story of a poor bayou family radically affected by the arrival of an oil-drilling crew. Although it too featured much "reenactment," Louisiana Story remained accurate in its general depiction of time, place, and people. At the time of his death the filmmaker was preparing to shoot a State Department-financed documentary on Hawaii.


Director - filmography

1. The Titan: Story of Michelangelo (1950)
... aka The Titan (USA: short title)

2. Louisiana Story (1948)
3. The Land (1942)

4. Elephant Boy (1937)
5. Man of Aran (1934)
6. Art of the English Craftsman (1933)
7. The English Potter (1933)
8. The Glassmakers of England (1933)
9. Industrial Britain (1933)

10. White Shadows in the South Seas (1928) (uncredited) (early shooting)
11. The Twenty-Four-Dollar Island (1927)
12. Moana (1926)
... aka Moana: A Romance of the Golden Age (USA)
... aka Moana: A Story of the South Seas (USA)
13. The Potterymaker (1925)
14. Nanook of the North (1922)
... aka Nanouk l'esquimau (France)



#20 of 35 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 01:37 PM

Robert J. Flaherty

Nanook of the North (1922) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image


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