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DIRECTOR FILMOGRAPHY - The Films of RICHARD LINKLATER


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#1 of 43 Jim_K

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Posted July 10 2005 - 01:14 AM

DIRECTOR FILMOGRAPHY - The Films of RICHARD LINKLATER

Rank ‘em, rate ‘em, review ‘em or whatever.

RICHARD LINKLATER

Me and Orson Welles (2008)


Inning by Inning: A Portrait of a Coach (2008)

Fast Food Nation (2006)
A Scanner Darkly (2006)
Bad News Bears (2005)
Before Sunset (2004)
$5.15/Hr. (2004) (TV)
The School of Rock (2003)
Live From Shiva's Dance Floor (2003)
Tape (2001)
Waking Life (2001)
The Newton Boys (1998)
SubUrbia (1996)
Before Sunrise (1995)
Dazed and Confused (1993)
Slacker (1991)
Heads I Win/Tails You Lose (1991) (V)
It's Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (1988)



Death before Streaming!


#2 of 43 Jim_K

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Posted July 10 2005 - 01:14 AM

Ratings out of Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image


RICHARD LINKLATER (1960 -     )


Me and Orson Welles (2008)  Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

Inning by Inning: A Portrait of a Coach (2008)
Fast Food Nation (2006) Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
A Scanner Darkly (2006) Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
Bad News Bears (2005) Posted Image Posted Image
Before Sunset (2004) Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

$5.15/Hr. (2004) (TV)
The School of Rock (2003) Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
Live From Shiva's Dance Floor (2003)
Tape (2001) Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
Waking Life (2001) Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
The Newton Boys (1998) Posted Image Posted Image

SubUrbia (1996)
Before Sunrise (1995) Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
Dazed and Confused (1993) Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
Slacker (1991) Posted Image
Heads I Win/Tails You Lose (1991)
It's Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (1988)



Death before Streaming!


#3 of 43 george kaplan

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Posted July 10 2005 - 01:18 AM

RICHARD LINKATER

Seen: 3
Like: 0
Own: 0

Rank order:

The School of Rock (2003)
Dazed and Confused (1993)
Slacker (1991)

"Movies should be like amusement parks. People should go to them to have fun." - Billy Wilder

"Subtitles good. Hollywood bad." - Tarzan, Sight & Sound 2012 voter.

"My films are not slices of life, they are pieces of cake." - Alfred Hitchcock"My great humility is just one of the many reasons that I...

#4 of 43 Brook K

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Posted July 10 2005 - 04:12 AM

1. School of Rock - A-
2. Tape - B+
3. Waking Life - B-
4. Dazed and Confused - C+
5. A Scanner Darkly - C+
6. Slacker - D
7. Bad News Bears - D


Own: 0

One of these days I'll do a Before Sunrise/After Sunset rental.
2002 Sight & Sound Challenge: 321  Last Watched: L'enfance Nue
Last 8 Films Watched: In the Loop - A- / It Might Get Loud - B+ / What Just Happened? - B / Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs - C- / Drums Along the Mohawk - A- / Punisher War Zone - B+ / Moon - C+ / A Man For All Seasons - B+

#5 of 43 george kaplan

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Posted July 10 2005 - 05:39 AM

4. Dazed and Confused - C+
5. Slacker - D
I'm shocked. As much as I hated those two films, I thought sure they'd be right up your alley. Posted Image
"Movies should be like amusement parks. People should go to them to have fun." - Billy Wilder

"Subtitles good. Hollywood bad." - Tarzan, Sight & Sound 2012 voter.

"My films are not slices of life, they are pieces of cake." - Alfred Hitchcock"My great humility is just one of the many reasons that I...

#6 of 43 Marc Fedderman

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Posted July 10 2005 - 06:49 AM

Out of 4 stars:

Waking Life Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image 1/2
Before Sunset Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image 1/2
Before Sunrise Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image 1/2
School of Rock Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

#7 of 43 SteveGon

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Posted July 10 2005 - 06:56 AM

Fast Food Nation (2007) ***
A Scanner Darkly (2006) ***
Bad News Bears (2005) **Posted Image
Before Sunset (2004) ***
The School of Rock (2003) ***
Waking Life (2001) ***
The Newton Boys (1998) **
SubUrbia (1996) **Posted Image
Before Sunrise (1995) ***
Dazed and Confused (1993) ***Posted Image
Slacker (1991) ***Posted Image
It's Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (1988) **Posted Image


#8 of 43 Bill McA

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Posted July 10 2005 - 07:11 AM

Ratings from Posted Image to Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

Me and Orson Welles (2008) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

Inning by Inning: A Portrait of a Coach (2008) 

Fast Food Nation (2006) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image
A Scanner Darkly (2006) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image (Own the DVD)
Bad News Bears (2005) Posted ImagePosted Image
Before Sunset (2004) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image
$5.15/Hr. (2004) (TV)
The School of Rock (2003) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image
Live From Shiva's Dance Floor (2003)
Tape (2001) Posted ImagePosted Image
Waking Life (2001) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image (Own the DVD)
The Newton Boys (1998) Posted ImagePosted Image
SubUrbia (1996) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image
Before Sunrise (1995) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image
Dazed and Confused (1993) Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image (Own the DVD)
Slacker (1991) Posted ImagePosted Image (Own the DVD)
Heads I Win/Tails You Lose (1991) (V)
It's Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (1988)

Seen 13
Own 4


       

#9 of 43 Kirk Tsai

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Posted July 10 2005 - 08:41 AM

Ranking:

1. Before Sunset
2. Before Sunrise
3. School of Rock
4. Tape
5. Waking Life
6. A Scanner Darkly
7. The Bad News Bears
8. Slacker

#10 of 43 Brook K

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Posted July 11 2005 - 02:51 AM

I didn't hate either of them, but found D&C to be an ok but generally unfunny comedy and Slacker to be dreadfully boring.
2002 Sight & Sound Challenge: 321  Last Watched: L'enfance Nue
Last 8 Films Watched: In the Loop - A- / It Might Get Loud - B+ / What Just Happened? - B / Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs - C- / Drums Along the Mohawk - A- / Punisher War Zone - B+ / Moon - C+ / A Man For All Seasons - B+

#11 of 43 Rich Malloy

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Posted July 11 2005 - 06:10 AM

Linklater's my favorite of the first wave of American Indie directors of the 90s, and these are my favorite of his films in order of preference:

Before Sunset - best film of its year IMO; and to think I'd always wished for an American Eric Rohmer.

Slacker - for me, this is the one that really started it all (that is, not "Sex lies and videotape"). I was an undergraduate in Texas when this film was made/premiered and so it's something of a personal sociological tract for me, not unlike a filmed college yearbook. It distills those times and that sense of place to their very essence - put it in the time capsule should anyone else ever care to know. I'd been placing "Slacker" at the top of my list in the many "What movie should Criterion release next?" threads over the years, but I never expected a release that was as amazing and comprehensive as the one we finally got. Keep your Soderberghs and Kevin Smiths, but leave me the Linklater!

Dazed and Confused - I sorta hesitate to place this one so high on the list, given that Slacker, Before Sunrise/Before Sunset, and Waking Life are the key films in Linklater's ouevre IMO. It rates as great mainstream entertainment a la "School of Rock", but it also falls somewhat within the context of the auteur-autobiography that the other films I mention reflect so well. And since I also went to high school in Texas (though in the early to mid-80s rather than the 1970s), this film also has something of a personal connection for me, and really works the nostalgia gland in acceptably unsentimental ways though not to the same extent as "Slacker".

Before Sunrise - jesus, is this guy following me or what? I also had a brief and memorable fling with a woman in Vienna the summer after my first year in law school. And, yes, I was probably a callow know-it-all, too. Like "Slacker", the film rings true in ways that aren't always flattering, and better yet never falls into the trap of sentimentalizing either youth or youthful romance. Everything from the "meet cute" to the "sweet poem that perfectly distills" is subverted and deconstructed, revealing them to be not only illusions, but illusions that our two young protagonists recognize as such... and yet nonetheless pine for.

Waking Life - basically a rotoscoped sequel to "Slacker", with roughly the same narrative form, setting (save a brief excursion to NYC, etc.), and even a few characters (not to mention Jesse and Celine from "Before Sunrise/Sunset"). I think a strong argument could be made that this is Linklater's best film (or perhaps second best after "Before Sunset"), but I'm listing in order of my preference!

School of Rock - Linklater in his director-for-hire role delivering mainstream fare that somehow manages to be just a little more subversive than it appears on the surface with a hero who's just a little less than likeable and certainly a far cry from heroic... aw hell, those kids are so damn cute.

Tape - without presuming some breakthrough in simplicity or "chastity" (dogme 95) or leaning on any particular cinema/theatrical tradition (the chamber dramas of Bergman), Linklater limits the action to three characters and a dingy hotel room, and oodles of anger, regret and recrimination. It's no surprise that perception and truth are invariably at odds, but to see this in an American film where emotional truth is generally a hackneyed explication of the conventional wisdom (vis "date rape", for example)? Almost astonishing.

It's Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books - hey, everybody has to start somewhere! Odd that a director who's made some of the "talkiest" films of the last decade began with a near wordless reverie like this.

I haven't seen any of the others except for Suburbia and The Newton Boys, both of which I'd previously dismissed as "not sufficiently Linklaterish". I've been meaning to give them both another viewing soon, and I hope to see whatever merit I missed the first time. Or not. I doubt they'd ever crack the list of favorites.
"Only one is a wanderer;
Two together are always going somewhere."

#12 of 43 ThomasC

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Posted July 26 2005 - 10:05 AM

out of Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

Before Sunrise Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
School of Rock Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image
Before Sunset Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

#13 of 43 Elizabeth S

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Posted July 27 2005 - 09:59 AM

Before Sunset (2004)
Before Sunrise (1995)
Dazed and Confused (1993)
The School of Rock (2003)
SubUrbia (1996)
Waking Life (2001)
Slacker (1991)

Seen the above, in order of preference. "Tape" is still sitting in my to-watch DVD pile.

#14 of 43 Rich Malloy

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Posted August 03 2005 - 04:28 AM

Andrew Sarris (the film critic most identified with the "auteur" theory) wrote up a fairly long piece on the career of Richard Linklater in this week's New York Observer that I thought appropos of this thread. As I seem to be one of the few people who consider Linklater to be one of the two or three most important directors starting with the American indie movement of the 90s, I'm especially pleased that someone with Sarris' pedigree seems to agree. It would be a shame IMO if Linklater's brilliance remains eclipsed by the far lesser directors who seem to be the object of endlessly fauning and mostly undeserving praise. As the link is only good for this week, I'm quoting a bit more of his piece than I otherwise would: http://www.observer....arrismovies.asp

Quote:
Since I decided recently that I was going to live forever, I figured that I had enough time to update The American Cinema, Directors and Directions 1929-1968 to the 21st Century, beginning with Richard Linklater, whom I am tentatively placing in the category “The Far Side of Paradise.”

Still in his 40’s, Mr. Linklater may have a stab at making my pantheon of English-language auteurs, which takes in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and the British Isles. Among the other recent auteurs I am following (though sometimes from a great distance) are: Robert Altman, Harold Becker, Robert Benton, the Coen Brothers, Francis Ford Coppola, Jonathan Demme, Clint Eastwood, the Farrelly Brothers, Peter Jackson, Jim Jarmusch, Ken Loach, David Lynch, Terrence Malick, Michael Mann, Errol Morris, Mike Nichols, David O. Russell, John Sayles, Martin Scorsese, Steven Soderbergh, Steven Spielberg, Quentin Tarantino, Gus Van Sant and Terry Zwigoff … but I am still very early in my research.

Part of my motivation in studying the present for clues to the future is to escape the spiritual paralysis of an unforgiving nostalgia for the past. André Bazin (1918-1958) once tried to exclude Hollywood directors from the purview of François Truffaut’s La Politique des Auteurs by invoking “the genius of the system” as an alternative theory to explain the large number of Hollywood classics. I raised my very tentative and respectful objections to Bazin—a film theorist I admired above all others—in my 1963 essay in Film Culture Magazine, entitled “Notes on the Auteur Theory in 1962.” This piece of critical writing annoyed Pauline Kael sufficiently to write the much more widely read “Circles and Squares” in Film Quarterly Magazine, launching a 40-year war for which I was polemically unprepared. The trouble was that the cultural establishment seized on the Sarris-Kael imbroglio as a way to keep critical theory out of a “fun” field like movies. Hence, I was suddenly catapulted from obscurity to notoriety without passing “Go.” Now, almost half a century later, I can refute Bazin’s “genius of the system” argument more succinctly simply by asking: If the “system” was responsible for the good films, then who or what was responsible for the much more numerous bad films?

Still, the “system” in Old Hollywood can be credited with giving its employees longer and more copious filmographies than most in the medium can count on today. Mr. Linklater’s comparatively “independent,” catch-as-catch-can career is a case in point. To begin with, his “Hollywood” was Texas, particularly Austin, which enabled him to find his first subject and the genre that established his identity. He was helped also by a technical versatility in the medium that he acquired without much instruction.

Mr. Linklater was born in Houston, Tex., in 1960, and dropped out of Sam Houston State University in 1982 to work on an offshore oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. He later parked cars before relocating to the state’s capital in Austin, where he founded a film society and raised funds to make his first film, a short entitled It’s Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (1987). Three years later, he released his first feature, Slacker (1991), a series of many brief conversations in constant transit between a shifting mise-en-scène of Austin’s youth culture spinning out of the University of Texas into the outside world. Slacker, widely circulated on the burgeoning film-festival circuit, received a big boost at the 1991 Sundance Film Festival, where it was hailed as a generational call to arms for disaffected rebels without a cause.

His subsequent films were more structured and plot-driven than Slacker, though equally youth-oriented. Dazed and Confused (1993) dealt with a varied group of Texas suburban high-school graduates in 1976. Performers like Matthew McConaughey, Ben Affleck, Parker Posey and Joey Lauren Adams were somewhat lower-billed here, and that new Texas girl, Renée Zellweger, flashed by in an early screen appearance.

Mr. Linklater somehow made his next film, Before Sunrise, in Europe, with Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy as strangers meeting on a train in Vienna and falling quickly and perhaps hopelessly in love on his last night in Europe. Mr. Linklater sustains this fragile conceit—very talky for a 90’s movie—with moderate success. But what’s most impressive in terms of Mr. Linklater’s overall career is his ability to shift gears from his collectivist orientation, with its generational alibis, to the romantic humanism of two such sharply etched individuals.

His next film, subUrbia (the title is gimmicked up in upper- and lower-case pretentiousness), was much darker and more despairing, as a group of alienated 20-year-olds hangs out in a suburban convenience-store parking lot, part of an aimless, growing drug subculture. When an old buddy of the group’s—now a rock star—shows up in a limo after playing a concert in town, the pent-up frustrations explode.

With The Newton Boys in 1998, Mr. Linklater suffered his first out-and-out creative setback. In this period crime saga of four Texas brothers who robbed banks across the country from 1919 to 1924, Mr. Linklater was unable to control the tempo of his material and the conviction in his characterizations. In many current “independent” careers, a flop like The Newton Boys could be the last picture for a director without any commercial blockbusters to his credit.

But at this point, Mr. Linklater’s aforementioned technical versatility came to his rescue with Waking Life (2001), an anime-like cartoon shot in video, but even more realistically enhanced than anime itself. The hyper-cerebral script consists of little more than a young man’s philosophical discussions with numerous people he encounters at random. Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy and Steven Soderbergh—no stranger to metaphysics in film himself—are among the real people who appear via their enhanced animated replicas.

One factor in Mr. Linklater’s ability to keep his head above water is his ability to work cheap. After all, Slacker, the film that first introduced him to the world, was made from $23,000. I don’t know what Tape (2001) cost, but it couldn’t have been much even with its respectable cast of Ethan Hawke, Uma Thurman and Robert Sean Leonard. It was shot on digital video in a dingy hotel room for all of its 86-minute running time. Can you get any cheaper than that?

Then suddenly and triumphantly Mr. Linklater is back in the system with his first big commercial success in The School of Rock (2003). Off to Paris Mr. Linklater goes to film his brilliant sequel to the 10-year-old Before Sunrise. It is called Before Sunset, and it made the top of my 2004 10-best list. Mr. Hawke and Ms. Delpy managed to be more affecting in the twilight of their affair than they were in its blazing beginning.

And so here we are in 2005, with Mr. Linklater’s Bad News Bears. The important thing is that he has survived and even thrived in a particularly treacherous period in film history. Jean Renoir once said of Leo McCarey that he was the one director in Hollywood who knew and liked people. And I can say much the same for Mr. Linklater, after I think about it a little. This may explain why I liked his version of Bad News Bears perhaps more than I should. There is a moment in Before Sunset in the middle of a long traveling shot in the Luxembourg Garden when Ms. Delpy impulsively reaches out to touch the back of Mr. Hawke’s head while he is turned away from her, but aborts the affectionate gesture when he starts turning toward her. In that short interval, Mr. Linklater has generated the most complex and most intense feelings one can imagine between these two people. It is for such privileged moments that one seeks to unravel the mysteries of directorial style.

There is nothing quite that revelatory in Bad News Bears. But there are many lingerings over communal feelings other directors might pass through more quickly to get to the next giggle or guffaw more efficiently. Mr. Linklater lingers one or two beats longer to let the feelings sink in for an audience. It may not be what the audience wants on all occasions, and it may not work with every story. But I have seen a wide enough range of lyrical expression in Mr. Linklater’s career to accord him an auteurist eminence I seldom encounter these days.

"Only one is a wanderer;
Two together are always going somewhere."

#15 of 43 Kirk Tsai

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Posted August 03 2005 - 07:08 AM

Quote:
I figured that I had enough time to update The American Cinema, Directors and Directions 1929-1968 to the 21st Century


Posted Image

#16 of 43 george kaplan

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Posted August 03 2005 - 07:14 AM

I'm especially pleased that someone with Sarris' pedigree seems to agree
Well, his 'pedigree' may be good, but some of his opinions are, well, not to my taste.

In his top 10 films of the year for 1958 he left out Vertigo, though he did include Topaz and Torn Curtain in their years.

In 1972 and 1974 he left out The Godfather and Godfather Part 2. But in 1990, Godfather Part 3 made his top 10.

He did not include either Dr. Strangelove or 2001 in the top 10 those years, but Full Metal Jacket made it.

He included neither Some Like It Hot or the Apartment in their years, but did include Wilder's Front Page.

It's all a matter of taste, but I don't think Mr. Sarris is someone I would turn to for advice about films.
"Movies should be like amusement parks. People should go to them to have fun." - Billy Wilder

"Subtitles good. Hollywood bad." - Tarzan, Sight & Sound 2012 voter.

"My films are not slices of life, they are pieces of cake." - Alfred Hitchcock"My great humility is just one of the many reasons that I...

#17 of 43 Rich Malloy

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Posted August 03 2005 - 07:43 AM

Many of his opinions are not to my taste either, and I could make a list even longer than yours. And the same goes for my favorite critics, currently Rosenbaum and Hoberman. But the value of a film critic (and film theorist in the case of Andrew Sarris) has less to do with the final subjective "thumbs up/thumbs down" and everything to do with their ability to apprehend the significance of a film within the context of the established canon. This is what separates the important writers from those that pollute the pages of your daily newspapers with their 3-paragraph glosses, whether or not their subjective opinion happens to align with your own.

Take Armond White, for example. He's as iconoclastic as they come (alright, maybe he's just downright nutty). Anyway, though I occasionally share the same subjective opinion as he (for example, we both adore the largely reviled "A.I."), I actually rarely agree with him. But I always read him, and I certainly come away with a much deeper understanding of cinema and the particular film reviewed than I do after reading something by Ebert, Travers, Gleiberman, et al.

Sarris is not nearly as iconoclastic (ok, nutty), but he's the thread that stretched back to Bazin, through Kael, and into today. To dismiss him for failing to acknowledge your favorite movie (and "Vertigo" is certainly one of mine, too) is to dismiss one of the most important critics/theorist who ever wrote about cinema. The man has a wealth of knowledge, and the rare ability to write about cinema without descending into a fog of overwrought plaudits and copy-ready quips.

I mean, do you reject Bazin because he refused to acknowledge the brilliance of "Casablanca"? Do you reject Kael because she dismissed "2001" as ultimately a cop-out? I would hope not! Though I certainly disagree with them vehemently regarding some of their opinions, I've learned far more about great cinema by reading their works. And by giving Sarris the same chance, I've learned a thing or two from him, as well.
"Only one is a wanderer;
Two together are always going somewhere."

#18 of 43 george kaplan

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Posted August 03 2005 - 08:49 AM

Well I will concede that there is a big distinction between a film scholar and a critic, and most critics fall into one of 2 piles: those who I disagree with a lot, but they're knowlegable about film, and those that I disagree with a lot, and aren't very knowlegable about film. Posted Image

In the end, most of the big name critics know more about film in general than I do (Michael Medved being a notable counterexample), but I always value my opinions about films more than any of them. Posted Image
"Movies should be like amusement parks. People should go to them to have fun." - Billy Wilder

"Subtitles good. Hollywood bad." - Tarzan, Sight & Sound 2012 voter.

"My films are not slices of life, they are pieces of cake." - Alfred Hitchcock"My great humility is just one of the many reasons that I...

#19 of 43 Justin_S

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Posted August 03 2005 - 12:26 PM

Ranks and ratings on a scale of * to *****:

1: A Scanner Darkly (2006) *****
2: Fast Food Nation (2006) ***½
3: Slacker (1991) ***
4: Bad News Bears (2005) ***
5: The Newton Boys (1998) **
6: Dazed and Confused (1993) **
7: The School of Rock (2003) *

Own 1

#20 of 43 Arman

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Posted August 20 2005 - 10:44 AM

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