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Movies with Bad Music Scores


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#81 of 100 OFFLINE   Mark Murphy

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Posted January 26 2005 - 06:23 AM

I always thought the score for The Fog was bad.

#82 of 100 OFFLINE   Gary->dee

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Posted January 26 2005 - 07:31 AM

I agree with you, Mark. I don't like any of the scores for the Terminator movies. Granted, I do understand the purpose and logic of that approach. They're very cold and brutally sparse scores that help in identifying with the bleak atmosphere of the story. Unlike any music for movies so they are unique. But that doesn't mean I necessarily like the music for the Terminator movies. And I think that prevents me from actually watching the movies, or in my case the one I do own- T2, because I place so much emphasis on a movie's soundtrack.

#83 of 100 OFFLINE   Robert James Clark

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Posted January 26 2005 - 01:29 PM

The worst score of last year has to be Horner's atrocious score for Troy. Horner seems to have hit rock bottom with this one. All the recent historical film cliche's are included in this one right down to the obligatory wordless/foreign language female vocalise that's been standard since English Patient.

I would also vote for rescoring any film scored by Randy Edelman (a hack if there ever was one, though Dragonheart was his best by far). No, Last of the Mohicans doesn't count since all the great music was written by Trevor Jones.

#84 of 100 OFFLINE   Robert James Clark

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Posted January 26 2005 - 01:34 PM



Oddly enough, if you listen to the fully orchestrated recording of selections from Terminator on Telarc by Erich Kunzel and the Cincinnati Pops, the music is actually very compelling.

Just goes to show you that cheesy 80's synthesizers were bad for everybody... Posted Image

#85 of 100 OFFLINE   Brian W. Ralston

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Posted January 26 2005 - 08:03 PM

Oh I don't know if I would go as far as to say it was the worst score of last year. You know he wrote the thing in like 11 days right? A time crunch situation not creaded by him, but by the producers. I just did a film with a wordless solo female soprano in the score and I feel it is different than other things out there. It is all about how you use it really. The "whailing" female vocalist sound has been over used...yes, I give you that. But something operatic and classical in nature I think is still very effective given the right moments. Especially if it is symbolic in the score of a character or something and not used as just an effect or "geographic" setting.
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#86 of 100 OFFLINE   Pete-D

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Posted January 27 2005 - 12:34 AM

Wasn't really crazy about the score in "Mystic River". Nor do I like the score in either of the "Resident Evil" films.

#87 of 100 OFFLINE   rich_d

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Posted January 27 2005 - 01:24 AM


You made me laugh with that one. Posted Image The facts are that that artists (of all types) hook on to an idea sometimes shamelessly. My son comments all the time about 'The Rock' influenced battle scenes he notices.

Being a successful composer of film scores has to be one of the hardest challenges imaginable. Even very successful film composers are accused of 'borrowing' music whether that happens to be their own or someone else's. Examples of each include Nina Roto's score for The Godfather (Fortunella) and Bernard Herrmann score for Vertigo (Tristan und Isolde).

Composers try to find some small nugget of music that they can use to create something 'new' ... if that is even possible. As if creating terrific music to someone else's visuals is not hard enough of a challenge ...

To Brian's point, sometimes composers are given precious little time to create a score. Randy Newman (on his commentary on the Pleasantville DVD) claimed that he was often given assignments that had to be completed in three weeks. Actually that composers are given "assignments" speaks volumes about the approach that many filmmakers seem to have towards film music. As in 'hey let's edit the heck out of this film and then slap on the score.' Why more directors do not involve a film composer in an earlier stage of the project so that they can understand (at least) the major themes and work them out is beyond my comprehension. At the very least, a director could understand whether the composer's music suits his vision.

As far as the solo female wailing, we also don't know the behind the scenes sort of things. I haven't heard it but I know that the Yared rejected score for Troy contained a 'women wailing' track. For all we know, that is something that the director absolutely wanted and forced on Horner as well. Don't know.

I have a tremendous respect for the work that film composers do and the results they've achieved. Quite amazing really. Much of it under tight deadlines along with the possibility that your score might be ultimately rejected with the added insult of it always becoming public knowledge. Something that has happened to many of the greats. Heck, Hitchcock himself rejected both Bernard Herrmann's score for Torn Curtain and Henry Mancini's score for Frenzy. Hitch would have been better served in trying to make those weaker efforts better to begin with.

#88 of 100 OFFLINE   AlexCremers

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Posted January 27 2005 - 02:04 AM

Oh no, I'm glad it turned out that way, with Maurice Jarre behind the synthesizers. Together with the beautiful and natural cinematography of John Seale it produced some great chemistry. I hate the thought of yet another bland, gray, run-of-the-mill orchestral score. I also love their work (Weir, Seale, Jarre, Ford) in 'The Mosquito Coast'. ------------ Alex Cremers

#89 of 100 OFFLINE   Eric C D

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Posted January 27 2005 - 02:50 AM



Todd, Argghhhh! I was foreboded into oblivion! Posted Image

Anyway, the real reason for responding was to be surprised that you didn't express an opinion on The Princess Bride, given the location stated under your name. Posted Image

#90 of 100 OFFLINE   JeremyErwin

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Posted January 27 2005 - 04:04 AM

I don't know if it qualifies, but back before Episode I was released, Lucas was debuting the trailer, "at selected locations." So naturally, I went into DC and saw it at the only theater that was playing it-- I believe it was the "Uptown"-- an old movie place with a enormous curved screen. Naturally, one could only see it if one had paid for a ticket-- and for those who endured an entire movie, the trailer, in the old tradition, would be shown once more. (Apparently, they once trailed the feature). And the films were The Waterboy, and Meet Joe Black. I chose the latter, not wishing to endure Adam Sandler. It turned out to be a pretty sappy film, and I felt that the actors were not really "up to the material." The film score, however, was emotionally effective, so that my brain was torn between wallowing in the musical pathos, and remaining appropriately indifferent to the action on screen. Of course, there are directors who habitually engage in this sort of torment--among them, Lars Von Trier. I was not, however, watching a Von Trier film; I was instead watching a mediocre film with a rather intrusive musical soundtrack.

#91 of 100 OFFLINE   Jeff_Standley

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Posted January 27 2005 - 04:12 AM

The Punisher
I actually liked the movie but the score was terrible.
"Do you think the average stormtrooper knows how to install a toilet main"?

#92 of 100 OFFLINE   BenjaminX

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Posted January 27 2005 - 04:58 AM

The worst score I've ever heard was probably the one for Troy. Blech! Add to the list Danny Elfman's scores pre-Beetlejuice. I saw The Aviator last week. Let me just say that was the best score I've listened to since Star Wars. The closing credit theme gave me chills.
Long Live DVD!

#93 of 100 OFFLINE   MatthewLouwrens

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Posted January 27 2005 - 05:19 PM

Hey! I like the Pee-Wee's Big Adventure score.

#94 of 100 OFFLINE   DavidPla

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Posted January 28 2005 - 03:59 AM

I agree. The score to "Pee-wee's Big Adventure" is incredible. One of Elfman's best.

#95 of 100 OFFLINE   Jim Barg

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Posted January 28 2005 - 04:15 AM

As film scores make up a third of my CD collection, I figured I'd throw my two cents in. The worst score I probably own is the Tangerine Dream version of Legend. Before that, it was Danny Elfman's Mission Impossible score - the only score I've ever returned. (For some reason, I was expecting it to be bombastic. Turns out it was just... dull.)
I liked both movie and score, especially the spaghetti-western feel to it. Original no, fun yes.

#96 of 100 OFFLINE   rich_d

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Posted January 28 2005 - 04:32 AM

Another thumbs-up to Pee-Wee's Big Adventure and a Danny Elfman commentary track DVD bargain (I've seen it for as little as 6 bucks). Who ever was playing lead clarinet during those recording sessions earned their money ... their fingers must have been burning. Also, pre-Beetlejuice gives us Midnight Run which has some very nice musical cues that compliment that film quite well. For highlights of Danny Elfman's earlier works (including TV stuff) I'd suggest Music For A Darkened Theatre - Volume One.

#97 of 100 OFFLINE   Brian W. Ralston

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Posted January 28 2005 - 08:13 AM

Correct. This was not the Queen Brian May, but another one...who passed away in 1997 and was considered one of Australia's finest film composers.
Regards,
Brian W. Ralston

#98 of 100 OFFLINE   BenjaminX

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Posted January 28 2005 - 08:22 AM

I just re-watched Peewee's Great Adventure and I was wrong about that one. I apologize. Posted Image
Long Live DVD!

#99 of 100 OFFLINE   Robert James Clark

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Posted January 28 2005 - 01:10 PM

I think it's OK for Yared to do it since he started it all with English Patient! I'd love to have seen the film with Yared's score...

#100 of 100 OFFLINE   rich_d

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Posted January 28 2005 - 02:03 PM

I have no idea who started solo female wailing but let's not forget how influential Pink Floyd's DSotM was/is with The Great Gig in the Sky.




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