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Subwoofer basics.


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5 replies to this topic

#1 of 6 Edwin K

Edwin K

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Posted August 06 2004 - 05:07 PM

Asking this question here is like asking a neurosurgeon for help with a head cold. But I’m here; you’re here, what the heck.
I just got a very basic, very simple HT setup. Your basic $200 entry level deal. Simple, but I can’t begin to tell you how much better it is than stereo speakers. Scared the crap out of my nephew with a demo of Jurassic Park III.
My sub can be adjusted + or – 10 db. That’s my question. What am I adjusting? I find it very amusing when the floor vibrates, if that helps. I use this mainly for DVDs, and they are almost all action adventure blowing stuff up DVDs.

#2 of 6 SethH

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Posted August 06 2004 - 05:18 PM

The idea is that your system is calibrated to a reference level which would be set with the sub at 0db. Then you have the option of raising or lowering the sub's gain by 10db. You can do a search on calibration to learn more about it. It involves a SPL (sound pressure level) meter and a calibration DVD.

#3 of 6 Edwin K

Edwin K

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Posted August 06 2004 - 05:34 PM

Yikes. I'll look into it further. Till then I'll leave it at 0db. I assume I can replace it with a powered sub some day? I may buy my next system a component at a time.

#4 of 6 Wayne A. Pflughaupt

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Posted August 07 2004 - 05:35 AM

Quote:
I assume I can replace it with a powered sub some day?
That usually isn’t possible with an entry-level system. With them typically the sub connects with speaker wire to the main unit – i.e., the sub isn’t providing it’s own power, the main unit is. A powered sub needs a line-level signal from an RCA jack.

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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#5 of 6 Edwin K

Edwin K

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Posted August 07 2004 - 06:17 AM

I wondered about that. I did find a powered sub that has both line-level and speaker-level inputs. I still plan on stair stepping my next system; buying one thing at a time. I may start with a better center channel, then fronts, surrounds, so on. I could hold off on the powered sub until I upgrade the receiver. Thanks for the information.

#6 of 6 Stephen Houdek

Stephen Houdek

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Posted August 08 2004 - 01:32 AM

You're probably better off buying a better processor first.

Not sure what your entry level system came with, but that will allow you some more flexibility when you want to upgrade your speakers.