Jump to content



Sign up for a free account to remove the pop-up ads

Signing up for an account is fast and free. As a member you can join in the conversation, enter contests and remove the pop-up ads that guests get. Click here to create your free account.

Photo
- - - - -

Calif lawsuit claims Sony widescreen TVs defective


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
79 replies to this topic

#1 of 80 OFFLINE   Frederick

Frederick

    Second Unit



  • 400 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 09 1999

Posted June 22 2004 - 09:49 AM

Taken from Reuters:

LOS ANGELES, June 22 (Reuters) - A California man has sued Sony Corp. of America in a proposed class action, claiming the electronics maker failed to warn consumers that the center of the screens of its widescreen televisions darken if watched frequently in "normal" mode.

Sinclair Cohen of San Jose spent "thousands of dollars" repairing his widescreen TV after Sony refused to fix it under warranty when the center of the screen darkened, the lawsuit, filed on Friday in Los Angeles Superior Court, said.

A Sony spokeswoman could not be reached for comment.

Broadcast, satellite and cable images are displayed in a 4-to-3 aspect ratio -- the proportion of TV screen width to height -- while a widescreen television boasts a 16-to-9 ratio to display movies on DVD and high definition television.

In the "normal" mode, the widescreen television displays the 4-to-3 screen image by drawing vertical gray bars on either side of the image to narrow the screen.

"If you watch a lot of normal TV, you'd watch it in this (normal) mode with these bars," Cohen's lawyer, Daniel Warshaw of Tarzana, California, said. "When you put it back to the widescreen image you see lines down the sides."

Warshaw said Cohen's TV set was "fairly new."

The suit said Sony should have warned Cohen and other customers that using the "normal" mode would ruin the picture.
His lawsuit accuses the New York-based subsidiary of Sony Corp. of false advertising, deceptive acts and unfair business practices, and asks a judge to certify a class of people who bought Sony widescreen TVs since 2000.

The lawsuit against Sony was filed the same day that a Florida man accused the U.S. electronics arm of Pioneer Corp. <6773.T> of selling defective high-definition televisions.
In that proposed class action, also filed in Los Angeles, the plaintiff said HD televisions built by Pioneer Electronics had an "over voltage condition" that caused permanent streaking lines across the screen.


Freddy C.
" ... Perfect does not mean perfect actions in a perfect world, but appropriate
actions in an imperfect one ..."

R.H. Blyth

#2 of 80 OFFLINE   StephenHa

StephenHa

    Second Unit



  • 364 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 28 2003

Posted June 22 2004 - 10:44 AM

my tv repair man said the same thing they should have something in the paperwork to keep people from doing that (you'd think they'd learn after millions of dollars in law suits)

#3 of 80 OFFLINE   Gary Seven

Gary Seven

    Screenwriter



  • 1,461 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 15 2003
  • Real Name:Gaston
  • LocationLake Worth, Florida

Posted June 22 2004 - 10:56 AM

I love the XBR when it works but Sony shipped so many xbr400 with bad digital boards that caused the TV to malfunction after two years. This happened to me. As a result, Sound Advice (Tweeter co) had to replace it with a XBR800 since I had the extended coverage.

Interesting to note that after so many reported problems with these sets, Sony still refused to acknowledge the problem.

This guy has a valid gripe against them. I wish him well.

#4 of 80 OFFLINE   Johnny_M

Johnny_M

    Second Unit



  • 281 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 06 2004

Posted June 22 2004 - 11:07 AM

ill have to bookmark this one for the next "does sony suck?" thread. Posted Image

Johnny

#5 of 80 OFFLINE   Steve Schaffer

Steve Schaffer

    Producer



  • 3,759 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 15 1999

Posted June 22 2004 - 12:27 PM

The owner's manual that came with mine warned about burn-in and clearly stated it was not covered under warranty.

My KP57-HW40 will be 3 years old in September and has seen a lot of use in Normal as well as a good mix of all other modes. I have contrast turned down to just under 50%. The set is on for an average of 40 hours a week and has no sign of burn-in whatsoever.
Steve S.
I prefer not to push the subwoofers until they're properly run in.

#6 of 80 OFFLINE   Rob Gardiner

Rob Gardiner

    Screenwriter



  • 2,950 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 15 2002

Posted June 22 2004 - 03:56 PM

I thought the grey bars on the sides were there specifically to prevent this very problem?

#7 of 80 OFFLINE   CalvinCarr

CalvinCarr

    Supporting Actor



  • 512 posts
  • Join Date: Dec 04 2003

Posted June 22 2004 - 10:45 PM

That's what I thought also. So when I get the XBR950 LCD how much 4:3 watching is too much?

#8 of 80 OFFLINE   Scott L

Scott L

    Producer



  • 4,466 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 29 2000

Posted June 22 2004 - 11:22 PM

The grey bars won't fully stop burn-in, it just helps to round things out, supposedly burning in the sides along with the middle at the same intensity. This lawsuit is proof that it's not 100% effective.

Guy shoulda came on HTF first and done some research on the DLP sets to avoid this whole mess :wink:

#9 of 80 OFFLINE   Rob Kramer

Rob Kramer

    Second Unit



  • 435 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 30 2004

Posted June 23 2004 - 12:06 AM

Quote:
Guy shoulda came on HTF first and done some research on the DLP sets to avoid this whole mess


Why? So he could sue Samsung for making him dizzy? I think he will get a bigger settlement from Sony.

Posted Image

#10 of 80 OFFLINE   CalvinCarr

CalvinCarr

    Supporting Actor



  • 512 posts
  • Join Date: Dec 04 2003

Posted June 23 2004 - 12:09 AM

What is considered too much 4:3 viewing? Should you watch in that mode less than 50% of the time?

#11 of 80 OFFLINE   Jason Charlton

Jason Charlton

    Screenwriter



  • 2,983 posts
  • Join Date: May 16 2002
  • Real Name:Jason Charlton
  • LocationBaltimore, MD

Posted June 23 2004 - 01:16 AM

Aaaarrrgggghhhh!!! This is just the kind of crap that drives me insane!


This is yet another example of some idiot consumer who obviously didn't read his manual (I have a Sony and it clearly explains the issues of burn-in and describes why there are stretch modes and how they prevent that type of permanent damage), doesn't understand a lick of the technology he has sitting in his living room, and is desparate to find SOMEONE ELSE to take the blame for his stupidity.

If he's experiencing problems this quickly, he most definitely has his picture set to the factory settings (which, admittedly are set dangerously high) and has likely NEVER even experimented with stretch modes.

Now I certainly don't expect everyone who buys a TV to have a copy of AVIA or DVE laying around, however I don't think it's too unreasonable to expect anyone who is going to spend thousands of dollars on a piece of electronics to at least have the common sense to learn SOMETHING about it, try to understand it and how it functions.

As a matter of fact, if this guy watches so much 4:3 material, what in the hell was he doing buying a widescreen set to begin with? Didn't he think it was odd that he has this widescreen set, and the "wide" part is nothing but gray all the time!?!?!?!?!

The more I think about it, with all the insane and often overblown panic floating around regarding burn-in, I find it amazing that this guy bought a widescreen RPTV and had no idea this was a possibility.

And as far as adding this to the reason Sony's suck, if anyone were to treat their Panny, Tosh, Mits, or what have you with the same idiocy as this guy, you'd experience the same problems.

This is in no way a Sony problem, and if you understand the technology and take a few simple steps, it's not even a problem at all. It's known as preventative care. Would you drive your brand new car for 5 years without changing the oil and then sue Toyota when your engine blows up? "But no one TOLD me I had to change the oil..." Of course not!

It's uninformed and uneducated consumers who do STUPID things and then find someone else to blame that drive me nuts. As far as I'm concerned, this guy has only himself to blame for wasting his thousands of dollars. If this lawsuit actually happens, it won't quite rank up there with McDonald's being sued for actually serving "hot" hot coffee, but it'll be close.



Thank you - now I have to find some way to get my blood pressure back to within a normal human range.

-Jason

Are you new to the Home Theater Forum? Stop by the New Member Introductions area and introduce yourself! See you there!


#12 of 80 OFFLINE   Frederick

Frederick

    Second Unit



  • 400 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 09 1999

Posted June 22 2004 - 09:49 AM

Taken from Reuters:

LOS ANGELES, June 22 (Reuters) - A California man has sued Sony Corp. of America in a proposed class action, claiming the electronics maker failed to warn consumers that the center of the screens of its widescreen televisions darken if watched frequently in "normal" mode.

Sinclair Cohen of San Jose spent "thousands of dollars" repairing his widescreen TV after Sony refused to fix it under warranty when the center of the screen darkened, the lawsuit, filed on Friday in Los Angeles Superior Court, said.

A Sony spokeswoman could not be reached for comment.

Broadcast, satellite and cable images are displayed in a 4-to-3 aspect ratio -- the proportion of TV screen width to height -- while a widescreen television boasts a 16-to-9 ratio to display movies on DVD and high definition television.

In the "normal" mode, the widescreen television displays the 4-to-3 screen image by drawing vertical gray bars on either side of the image to narrow the screen.

"If you watch a lot of normal TV, you'd watch it in this (normal) mode with these bars," Cohen's lawyer, Daniel Warshaw of Tarzana, California, said. "When you put it back to the widescreen image you see lines down the sides."

Warshaw said Cohen's TV set was "fairly new."

The suit said Sony should have warned Cohen and other customers that using the "normal" mode would ruin the picture.
His lawsuit accuses the New York-based subsidiary of Sony Corp. of false advertising, deceptive acts and unfair business practices, and asks a judge to certify a class of people who bought Sony widescreen TVs since 2000.

The lawsuit against Sony was filed the same day that a Florida man accused the U.S. electronics arm of Pioneer Corp. <6773.T> of selling defective high-definition televisions.
In that proposed class action, also filed in Los Angeles, the plaintiff said HD televisions built by Pioneer Electronics had an "over voltage condition" that caused permanent streaking lines across the screen.


Freddy C.
" ... Perfect does not mean perfect actions in a perfect world, but appropriate
actions in an imperfect one ..."

R.H. Blyth

#13 of 80 OFFLINE   StephenHa

StephenHa

    Second Unit



  • 364 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 28 2003

Posted June 22 2004 - 10:44 AM

my tv repair man said the same thing they should have something in the paperwork to keep people from doing that (you'd think they'd learn after millions of dollars in law suits)

#14 of 80 OFFLINE   Gary Seven

Gary Seven

    Screenwriter



  • 1,461 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 15 2003
  • Real Name:Gaston
  • LocationLake Worth, Florida

Posted June 22 2004 - 10:56 AM

I love the XBR when it works but Sony shipped so many xbr400 with bad digital boards that caused the TV to malfunction after two years. This happened to me. As a result, Sound Advice (Tweeter co) had to replace it with a XBR800 since I had the extended coverage.

Interesting to note that after so many reported problems with these sets, Sony still refused to acknowledge the problem.

This guy has a valid gripe against them. I wish him well.

#15 of 80 OFFLINE   Johnny_M

Johnny_M

    Second Unit



  • 281 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 06 2004

Posted June 22 2004 - 11:07 AM

ill have to bookmark this one for the next "does sony suck?" thread. Posted Image

Johnny

#16 of 80 OFFLINE   Steve Schaffer

Steve Schaffer

    Producer



  • 3,759 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 15 1999

Posted June 22 2004 - 12:27 PM

The owner's manual that came with mine warned about burn-in and clearly stated it was not covered under warranty.

My KP57-HW40 will be 3 years old in September and has seen a lot of use in Normal as well as a good mix of all other modes. I have contrast turned down to just under 50%. The set is on for an average of 40 hours a week and has no sign of burn-in whatsoever.
Steve S.
I prefer not to push the subwoofers until they're properly run in.

#17 of 80 OFFLINE   Rob Gardiner

Rob Gardiner

    Screenwriter



  • 2,950 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 15 2002

Posted June 22 2004 - 03:56 PM

I thought the grey bars on the sides were there specifically to prevent this very problem?

#18 of 80 OFFLINE   CalvinCarr

CalvinCarr

    Supporting Actor



  • 512 posts
  • Join Date: Dec 04 2003

Posted June 22 2004 - 10:45 PM

That's what I thought also. So when I get the XBR950 LCD how much 4:3 watching is too much?

#19 of 80 OFFLINE   Scott L

Scott L

    Producer



  • 4,466 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 29 2000

Posted June 22 2004 - 11:22 PM

The grey bars won't fully stop burn-in, it just helps to round things out, supposedly burning in the sides along with the middle at the same intensity. This lawsuit is proof that it's not 100% effective.

Guy shoulda came on HTF first and done some research on the DLP sets to avoid this whole mess :wink:

#20 of 80 OFFLINE   Rob Kramer

Rob Kramer

    Second Unit



  • 435 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 30 2004

Posted June 23 2004 - 12:06 AM

Quote:
Guy shoulda came on HTF first and done some research on the DLP sets to avoid this whole mess


Why? So he could sue Samsung for making him dizzy? I think he will get a bigger settlement from Sony.

Posted Image





Forum Nav Content I Follow