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Does everyone know what WD-40 stands for?


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20 replies to this topic

#1 of 21 OFFLINE   John*C

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Posted May 21 2004 - 11:06 PM

In 1955 NASA was having condensation problems with their Atlas rockets, a nameless company started batch after batch but stopped after the 40th batch. Water Drier 40th batch is what WD-40 stands for, great on your cars ignition wires and electronics, Roller Skate precision bearings, and pieces to stop the squeaking. They thought why try when the 40th batch did the trick, they are now a named company aptly named WD-40 Inc.


Did you know that if not you 'do' now!Posted Image

#2 of 21 OFFLINE   Philip_G

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Posted May 22 2004 - 12:11 AM

I always thought it was displacement.

#3 of 21 OFFLINE   Nick Sievers

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Posted May 22 2004 - 12:15 AM

I thought it stood for Water Displacement. At least that is what i've always been told.
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#4 of 21 OFFLINE   Bruce N

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Posted May 22 2004 - 12:29 AM

http://www.wd40.com/.../wd40_faqs.html
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#5 of 21 OFFLINE   ChrisMatson

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Posted May 22 2004 - 05:27 AM

I was going to post the same re: Displacement.
Here is the WD-40 history link with fascinating trivia;
http://www.wd40.com/...ur_history.html

#6 of 21 OFFLINE   Sebastian

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Posted May 22 2004 - 06:38 AM

Man, WD-40 sounds awesome!

#7 of 21 OFFLINE   Steve Schaffer

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Posted May 22 2004 - 02:17 PM

WD-40 is indispensable once you've tried it.

I'm in the auto repair business and can't imagine doing my job without the stuff. It's a great lubricant/cleaner--frees up balky door lock cylinders, easily id's squeaky drive belts, spray some on a rag and it will clean smudges off plastic surfaces and dry without leaving a shiny coating like the so-called protectants. All kinds of sticky body mechanisms like window regulators, HVAC control linkages and cables, cupholders gummed up with soda, shifters jammed likewise with dried soda, all work like new after a few shots of WD.

If you have to deal with a lot of car interior issues the 2 basic necessities are WD-40 and superglue.
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#8 of 21 OFFLINE   Chris Derby

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Posted May 22 2004 - 03:09 PM

two words:

chain lube

=)
-derby

#9 of 21 OFFLINE   Cary_H

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Posted May 22 2004 - 04:25 PM

It's good if you want just one product to meet your all-purpose needs. It does a lot of things, but not many of 'em all that well.
It's difficult to apply without leaving a mess. Graphite powder is superior on locks. There are better things out there for use as penetrating fluids, paint removers, and lubes. It's a pretty fair hand-cleaner, but I wouldn't think it's all that good for you. It is unsafe for O-ring chains, isn't heavy enough for the task, and is easily washed/flung off.
It is called water displacement for a reason. It is great on auto electric connections. Repels water intrusion and inhibits corrosion.
When you have access to the right tools for the job, WD-40 rarely sees the light of day.

#10 of 21 OFFLINE   John*C

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Posted May 23 2004 - 03:02 AM

Whatever you want to call it Displacement or Drier, it's a 'boon' to use and feel you've accomplished something using the right product for the right job.Posted Image

#11 of 21 OFFLINE   JustinCleveland

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Posted May 24 2004 - 12:29 AM

Anyone here use WD-40 on their knees? I interviewed a former Packer, present Eagle, Nate Wayne who swears by it. I've found 2 other people since who put WD-40 on their knees and say it's a godsend.

Anyone?

#12 of 21 OFFLINE   David Williams

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Posted May 24 2004 - 04:28 AM

Quote:
Anyone here use WD-40 on their knees? I interviewed a former Packer, present Eagle, Nate Wayne who swears by it. I've found 2 other people since who put WD-40 on their knees and say it's a godsend.

Anyone?

Is this in any way related to soaking your elbow in Windex? Posted Image
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#13 of 21 OFFLINE   MikeSerrano

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Posted May 24 2004 - 05:50 AM

Quote:
Anyone here use WD-40 on their knees?

Yes.

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#14 of 21 OFFLINE   CalvinCarr

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Posted May 24 2004 - 05:50 AM

No but I once had lock jaw and it freed it right up.

#15 of 21 OFFLINE   John*C

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Posted May 24 2004 - 09:17 AM

Too bad I can't use on my non unions(plural) and joints in my crushed ankle that's crippling me, I really would like to go back to work. Meet that special someone with 10 good fingers and toes that I don't have much of at this time.
I do use it on all things moving except plastic.

#16 of 21 OFFLINE   Steve Schaffer

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Posted May 24 2004 - 04:25 PM

I think there's a sorta urban legend that WD-40 can soak thru skin and help ease joint pain. I know that at 54 I have no joint pain whatever in my hands but plenty elsewhere from time to time and get my hands covered with WD on a frequent basis so there may be some truth to the legend.

I've also found superglue to be very effective for sealing up the kinds of cuts one gets from razor sharp metal dashboard re-inforcements. Spray carburetor cleaner on the cut first to disinfect then run a bead of superglue down the cut. Stings like hell but very quick and effective.
Steve S.
I prefer not to push the subwoofers until they're properly run in.

#17 of 21 OFFLINE   CalvinCarr

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Posted May 24 2004 - 10:59 PM

Super glue is also very effective at sealing kids mouthes....Posted Image

#18 of 21 OFFLINE   Philip_G

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Posted May 24 2004 - 11:06 PM

another wives tale is that it works well on fishing lures.
dunno if it helped, sure didn't hurt Posted Image

#19 of 21 OFFLINE   PhillJones

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Posted May 25 2004 - 01:49 AM

Quote:
I've also found superglue to be very effective for sealing up the kinds of cuts one gets from razor sharp metal dashboard re-inforcements. Spray carburetor cleaner on the cut first to disinfect then run a bead of superglue down the cut. Stings like hell but very quick and effective.


Believe it or not, that's what superglue was invented for: glueing skin back together.

#20 of 21 OFFLINE   ChrisMatson

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Posted May 25 2004 - 05:57 AM

Don't believe that piece about "super glue." Cyanoacrylate was developed as a clear plastic for the military after WWII.

Ibraheem T. Badejo; Closure Medical Corporation, Raleigh, NC 27616

Cyanoacrylates in Medicine

The adhesive properties of cyanoacrylates were discovered by accident at a Tennessee Eastman Labs by a group of scientists led by Coover. Cyanoacrylates have the ability to rapidly polymerized and bond to many surfaces. The unique ability of cyanoacrylates to polymerize without a catalyst is attributed to the strongly electron withdrawing groups of the cyano (-CN) and the carboxyl (-COOR) moieties (structure below).

In 1965, Watson and Maguda made the first attempt to use industrial grade methyl cyanoacrylate in the clinically environment for tympanic membrane repair. This material was showed unacceptable tissue toxicity. Since then, further clinical studies have employed the use of higher homologues such as n-butylcyanoacylate which have shown very little to no tissue toxicity. On going research is being conducted on modifying the carboxyl moiety of the cyanoacrylate to improve its biodegradability and tissue toxicity.

Closure Medical Corporation is actively engaged in developing its proprietary cyanoacrylate technology into useful medical products to improve the treatment of various wound treatments and closures in medicine. In 1998, Closure Medical received the first FDA approval for the use of a formulated 2-octylcyanoacrylate (DERMABOND® * Topical Skin Adhesive) for the closure of lacerations. In 1999, Closure Medical received FDA approval for a proprietary cyanoacrylate formulation for the relief and treatment of oral ulcers. Also in 2000, Closure Medical completed human clinical trials for the use of its proprietary cyanoacrylate formulation for the treatment of minor cuts and abrasion.

*DERMABOND® is a trademark of Ethicon, Inc.
http://mstconf.com/Adhesives-abs.htm





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