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The Outer Limits (Original Series) - comments?


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#21 of 121 Ockeghem

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Posted May 02 2010 - 11:45 AM

Nelson,

I love Behold, Eck! for many reasons.  First, the representation of a two-dimensional being is very ambitious, and I thought very well done.  (Note, for example, what happens to Eck when it turns sideways.)  Secondly, the compassion eventually displayed by the alien (Eck) is IMO one of the very best qualities that sci-fi has to offer.  Thirdly, the ending of that episode is somewhat surprising, and the limits that the earthlings go to to help Eck is quite commendable.

#22 of 121 Nelson Au

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Posted May 02 2010 - 03:06 PM

Yes Scott, Dr. Stone and Elizabeth were exceptionally open minded and idealistic. I was surprised to read in the Outer Limits Companion book how the producers felt the episode was a failure. It was meant to be light comedy with a monster that had a good heart.

#23 of 121 jim_falconer

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Posted May 02 2010 - 10:30 PM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Nelson Au 

The Inheritors part 1 was really interesting. I think I see where it's going. I'll watch part 2 tomorrow. 
 
The Inheritors part 1 & 2 is by far my favorite episode of this great show.  It has a terrific story, and fantastic performances by all the actors involved...absolutely love it!


#24 of 121 Hollywoodaholic

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Posted May 03 2010 - 01:40 AM

I was a big fan of all Steve Ihnat's appearances on just about every television show throughout the '60s. He just brought a force, a presence, often a malevolence ... from "Whom Gods Destroy" on Star Trek, to this great two-parter on The Outer Limits. I don't think he ever was a regular on any show, or had his own show, but checking imdb, he certainly worked enough appearing on just about every major series during that decade.

I always wondered why we didn't see much of him later on, and was sad to read he died of a heart attack at only 38 while in Cannes, France. He's buried in the Westwood cemetary where Marilyn Monroe is entombed. Even sadder, he had only one son, who died of diabetes at 32 and is buried with him. I also never knew he was from Czechoslovakia, where his family fled when he was five.

Great actor. His performances during our favorite '60s shows are preserved forever. I was always excited to see him turn up, whether on The Mod Squad or The Virginian. I knew we were in for some fireworks.

#25 of 121 Ockeghem

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Posted May 03 2010 - 07:54 AM

Hollywood,

That's very interesting news on Inhat.  I have never read any of his biographical information nor looked it up before.  As you wrote, he passed at such a young age.  He was roughly the same age as a few composers that I greatly admire (Chopin, Mendelssohn, Mozart, and Schubert, among others).

I didn't know that he guest starred in any westerns (e.g., The Virginian).  I'd like to see him in that genre.

#26 of 121 Nelson Au

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Posted May 03 2010 - 09:57 AM

I just watched part 2 of The Inheritors. I seem to vaguely recall the last scene when Ballard goes inside the ship and sees the children. With the exception for the limited budget they had to build that capsule, that was a really well done episode and cool concept. It's interesting that in those days, for TV shows, they end them the way they do. With all the characters sort of frozen in that last shot as the camera pans away. It's sort of like a play. It really isn't necessary to see them leave on the ship.

I wasn't sure why Minns was crying as he was pcking up the kids. Perhaps he had doubts too about this mission he was forced to carry out. Or he was sad to see these children end up as they are, or he was happy for them as they would go onto a better quality of life. I agree, Ihnat's performance was very good in this episode. 

It was also cool to see Jan Shutan (Lt. Mira Romaine) in this episode as the mother of one of the kids. And Ivan Dixon and the German actor, Leon Askin who was in Hogans Heros and also the actor who played one of the scientists in part 1 was one of the Ekosian underground, Willam Wintersole who was Abrom.

I'll see about picking up Mission: Impossible for Ihnat's episode. I had read about Ihnat on the wikipedia last week. It is a shame he passed so young.


#27 of 121 ToddR2

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Posted May 03 2010 - 10:07 AM

Nelson, if you're picking up a season of Mission:Impossible, make sure to choose season three. The Mind of Stefan Miklos is the best Mission ever made (IMO), and features a terrific performance by Ihnat. Ihnat was a great performer. Such a pity he died so young.

#28 of 121 Nelson Au

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Posted May 03 2010 - 10:38 AM

Todd, I had picked up Mission's Season 1 set a few years ago when it first came out. I had been meaning to get S2 and S3 and likely S4 for Nimoy's shows, but remastered blu-ray Star Trek and Hawaii Five-0 distracted me!.

Thanks for specifying the Mission: Impossible set that has Ihnat's episodes. It's on my list now! And I recall some really good episodes with Landau and Bain.


#29 of 121 michael_ks

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Posted May 04 2010 - 02:19 AM

I enjoyed reading the accolades accorded to Steve Ihnat, one of my all time favorite character actors that was gone virtually unnoticed (though many would recognize him as Garth of Izar of course).  I'm glad to see others appreciative of his acting mettle.  Mr. Ihnat was a most underrated actor who, perhaps better than anyone had the ability of taking the most simplistic dialogue and through his special gift for oratory, was able to maintain your rapt attention.

Steve Ihnat was a stand out in the VTTBOTS episode "The Price of Doom" eventhough he doesn't even make it through the teaser and is given just a couple lines (one of which is repeated over and over: "Ice Station T for 'Tic-Toc' to Seaview--come in Seaview").  Poor soul, succumbing to the dreaded plankton.

#30 of 121 SimonTemplar

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Posted May 05 2010 - 10:21 PM

Check Steve Ihnat out in the Marlon Brando movie The Chase. He's got a small part in it but radiates danger whenever he is on. It's an underappreciated movie with several of my favourite actors, not the least Ihnat, Robert Duvall, Janice Rule and the seriously underappreciated Richard Bradford.


#31 of 121 HenryDuBrow

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Posted May 06 2010 - 03:20 AM

"Check Steve Ihnat out in the Marlon Brando movie The Chase. He's got a small part in it but radiates danger whenever he is on. It's an underappreciated movie with several of my favourite actors, not the least Ihnat, Robert Duvall, Janice Rule and the seriously underappreciated Richard Bradford."

And Henry Hull.  


#32 of 121 Nelson Au

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Posted May 06 2010 - 09:27 AM

Revisiting this thread and after seeing The Inheritors, I have watched a few more. Wolf 359 and It Crawled Out of the WoodWork. Amusing to see more pre-Star Trek guest stars in WoodWork. Barbara Luna must have been a kid there!

I rarely watch these episodes, they are pert of shows that didn't connect for me. I liked the idea of Wolf 359 and how the title was used as a reference in Star Trek The Next Generation. The idea of the creature wasn't clearly explained. i can see one reason was the creature was there so he couldn't see into the future.

For Woodwork, I guess you just can't break the law of conservation of energy. It wasn't entirely clear why the guy who ran Norco was killing everyone and bringing them back with the pace makers. Unless it was keep the secret of the lab. The OL Companion book sort of explains it as Stefano's way of writing ideas that don't really resolve. More of a horror story idea.

I also saw The Premonition, a favorite of mine as a kid too. That was straightforward sci-fi.


#33 of 121 Craig Beam

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Posted May 06 2010 - 01:50 PM

Much of the first season --- particularly the episodes written by Joe Stefano --- don't always make linear sense.  It's more about mood and just plain weirdness.  Part of the horror stems from the fact that things don't always add up --- like a fever dream, or surrealist art.  I absolutely ADORE the first season for exactly those reasons.  /img/vbsmilies/htf/biggrin.gif  The abbreviated second season is a giant step down in quality (aside from a few exceptions:  "Demon With a Glass Hand," "The Duplicate Man," "The Inheritors"), but it's still immensely entertaining.  The Outer Limits is my second favorite TV series of all time (behind The Twilight Zone).  I'd love to see it get restored and remastered in high definition, but I'm not holding my breath.


#34 of 121 Nelson Au

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Posted May 06 2010 - 02:47 PM

Good points Craig.

(By the way, didn't mean to run on about the blu ray remastering for The Twilight Zone on that thread.)

I should review who wrote my favorite episodes from the first year and see if Stefano wrote them! 
1. The Galaxy Being
2. The Man with the Power
3. The Sixth Finger
4. The Man Who Was Never Born (Amongst the top 5 for me)
5. The Borderland
6. The Zanti Misfits
7. Controlled Experiment (Top 5)
8. The Bellero Shield (Top 5)
9. Fun and Games 
10. The Special One
11. A Feasibility Study (Top 5)
12. The Chameleon

There are a few that Stefano wrote in that list. And I haven't seen Second Chance in a long time. I should see that one again as well as the others to re-evaluate them.

I agree with your list of second season shows, Demon is number 1 on my list. I would add Soldier, Warm Heart, Cold Hands, I, Robot, Behold, Eck!, The Premonition, and The Probe. The Invisible Enemy was kinda cool too. Expanding Human was kinda offbeat. Neat to see Doohan in another role and the other actors, Homeier and Andes before they guested on Trek too.




#35 of 121 Ockeghem

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Posted May 06 2010 - 03:37 PM

There are some interesting and informative comments here.  Very nice!

For my own part, and although I love the music from both seasons, the second season has a few more themes that I admire and appreciate more than the first.  Nelson's comments regarding Wolf 359 reminded me that that episode has the gorgeous descending augmented (III+) triad in G minor that I've spoken of once or twice before.  The same progression is heard just prior to Ikar stamping out the ants in Keeper Of the Purple Twilight.  This music is eerily similar to the second season closing theme (progression-wise), and as Tanaleaf once remarked, it was perhaps a reworking of what occurred in the chilling theme used for One Step Beyond.

Another favorite of mine (besides those that have already been mentioned) is The Children of Spider County.  Particularly engaging is the opening aural segue which you hear from the beginning of the fadeout and which blends right into the very dissonant first season music opening chord.  The editing couldn't have been done any better IMO.  And visually, we see the horrific transformation of the man into the alien as we are hearing this seamless cue -- astonishing, and perhaps unprecedented in sci-fi television pre-1964.

Two other favorites of mine are The Architects of Fear and The Invisibles.  Both episodes are to me examples of pure sci-fi (above and beyond what we might consider mainstream sci-fi).  More later. :)



#36 of 121 Nelson Au

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Posted May 06 2010 - 04:27 PM

Scott, I'll check out Children of Spider County. I can't remember this one, but that will probably change when I see it. I agree, there's a lot of very cool music and it's an integral part of this series. They literally don't make 'em like they used to! The Architects of Fear should have been on my list too.

#37 of 121 Ethan Riley

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Posted May 06 2010 - 07:42 PM

You know which episode freaked me out as a child--it was the one where that criminal hid inside a house--and the house wouldn't let him go. And the house had some sort of disembodied voice that was talking to him. And there were those creepy old people in the house. And there was that long, dark hallway with 100s of doors on each side, and the criminal was opening each one, trying to get out of the house. I loved that episode, but I think it gave me nightmares when I was 7 lol. That was one moody, spooky episode if you ask me...

 

 


#38 of 121 Hollywoodaholic

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Posted May 07 2010 - 01:35 AM

"The Guests" from Season 1. And if you saw it today, it still holds up as creepy and surreal experience with some very bizarre lighting and innovative cinematography by Kenneth Peach. Not to mention some great performances by Gloria Grahame, and Nellie Burt as the old lady who repeats everything in silly song. The image of the house shimmering into a brain haunted me for many nights in my youth, and stimulated my imagination into new directions.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethan Riley 

You know which episode freaked me out as a child--it was the one where that criminal hid inside a house--and the house wouldn't let him go. And the house had some sort of disembodied voice that was talking to him. And there were those creepy old people in the house. And there was that long, dark hallway with 100s of doors on each side, and the criminal was opening each one, trying to get out of the house. I loved that episode, but I think it gave me nightmares when I was 7 lol. That was one moody, spooky episode if you ask me...
 



#39 of 121 michael_ks

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Posted May 10 2010 - 03:41 AM


Much of the first season --- particularly the episodes written by Joe Stefano --- don't always make linear sense.  It's more about mood and just plain weirdness.  Part of the horror stems from the fact that things don't always add up --- like a fever dream, or surrealist art.  I absolutely ADORE the first season for exactly those reasons. 


Agreed, Craig.  That's precisely why I especially enjoy episodes like "It Crawled Out of the Woodwork", "Don't Open Till Doomsday" and "The Forms of Things Unknown".  The very straight forward and linear episodes like "Moonstone", "The Mutant" and "Tourist Attraction", though watchable, just don't work as well for me because they are so firmly grounded in speculative fiction that mirrors ordinary mainstream drama.

In addition to the first three episodes I mentioned above, I also find myself drawn to those episodes that feature fragile, wistful dialogue that comments on the human condition in erudite fashion, seemingly almost Shakespearian at times.  For this reason I'm very fond of "The Bellero Shield", "The Man Who Was Never Born", "The Sixth Finger", "The Human Factor", and again, that most perfect of episodes--"Forms of Things Unknown".  Alot of credit should go to both Sally Kellerman and David McCallum, who masterfully deliver some beautifully written lines in not one, but two episodes each.



#40 of 121 Hollywoodaholic

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Posted June 23 2010 - 01:49 AM

I was watching "A Feasibility Study" from season one last night with my 13 year-old son and the PQ was just a miserable, scratched, muddy piece of crap. I can't believe Season 5 of the newer version of the series (speaking of crap) is coming out, but we can't get a decent re-release of perhaps the most influential gothic horror/science fiction show ever.


Does MGM still own this and could any remastered re-release be affected by their financial woes? It just doesn't make sense that The Twilight Zone is on it's third incarnation on DVD (this time in Blu), and this classic is still stalled in shitsville.


Since James Cameron copped Terminator from an episode of this series ("Soldier"), perhaps he can step up and kick start the process. He could have the whole thing 3D-ed. The ray from the blob in "Don't Open til Doomsday" could zap out at you; crawling "Zanti Misfits" creeping all over your living room; "Galaxy Being" beamed onto your sofa.


Since The Watchmen copped the plotline from "The Architects of Fear" maybe Alan Moore can tithe some earnings toward a re-mastering.


And since Toy Story 3 copped the hand-holding-to-meet-their-fate moment from "A Feasibility Study," maybe John Lassiter can buy the whole damn series out and re-release it in time to have under our Christmas trees this year.


A fan can hope.