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Has anyone framed with Stainless Steal stud?


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11 replies to this topic

#1 of 12 marc_manny

marc_manny

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Posted January 20 2004 - 07:49 AM

My basement is not suited for a home theater. It is a little to damp at times. I was hoping to build a small corner for a workshop where I could then build speakers and such. I was looking at the stainless steal studs because they would not rot. I was curious if any of you guys have had experience with them. How easy to work with and such.

Thanks,
Marc

#2 of 12 MarcianoD

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Posted January 20 2004 - 07:57 AM

I have done a lot with stainless steel. Yes they are very easy to work with just be carefull not to screw your drywall in to far.

Much easier than wood. They also do great with dampening sound from above. Its almost like a sound barrier.

#3 of 12 Stephen Weller

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Posted January 20 2004 - 07:57 AM

Are you sure they're stainless? I know of steel framing, but stainless would be costly. From watching This Old House, they're VERY easy to work with because they're all perfectly true (no annoying warps, bends, twists, knots, or bows), though the construction techniques are different.

Pressure treated won't rot either. But you probably try to solve (or at least minimze) that dampness problem.

#4 of 12 marc_manny

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Posted January 20 2004 - 03:04 PM

My basement is not really that damp, but the people that I bought the place from had room set up in the basement and they put somestrapping down with plywood over it. The strapping and plywood were both rotten and had mold growing on them.

I basically do not want to not have wood on the floor.

Thanks,
Marc

#5 of 12 Juan Castillo

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Posted January 21 2004 - 03:13 AM

Before you frame the place up, can't you put a moisture barrier on the walls and floor?

#6 of 12 tom derby

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Posted January 21 2004 - 03:18 AM

i used steel studs for my basement framing. much easier to use. no messsy sawdust either. like the others said, they are straight, light and easy to work with. Just remember that you can't nail any thing into them. The only problem i ran into was when i went to put the floor moldings in. couldn't nail them in, had to glue them, that was a pain. i would use the metal in a heartbeat though if i had it to do over again.

#7 of 12 sloan

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Posted January 21 2004 - 04:22 AM

Hi guys

My .02$ worth, I am a licensed wall & ceiling contractor, have been using "metal" studs for 20 plus years, some things to consider would be:

Any moisture problems must be addressed from the exterior of the foundation, I have not seen any damp proofing methods that work when applied on the interior surface of foundation wall, check for proper drainage around perimeter of house, re-locate or extend any eavestroughing down spouts away from foundation, check for obvious cracks and holes and fill these with a quality epoxy concrete patching compound or equivalent. Apply a layer of roofing felt on inside of foundation wall, space new metal framing at least 1 inch from foundation, a foam spacer can be placed under the bottom metal track to separate it from the concrete. A metal stud will rust in high moisture conditions but usually only under severe conditions. Use a quality insulation, kept 6" from the floor, super 6 polyethylene vapor barrier, seams taped and sealed with accoustical type sealant (caulking). Finish with 1/2" drywall kept 1/2" off the concrete floor to prevent wicking of any moisture.

To clarify fastening mouldings and trim there are drywall "trim head screws" available for this they have a small robertson head, like a finishing nail these will screw into the metal studs and tracks, available in different lengths, always good to glue and screw.
As far as mounting things to the finished wall a metal stud can hold basic things like picture frames etc.. by using a screw, just don't strip it. If something must be hung that is heavy install wood "backing" between the studs before drywall goes up in the appropriate locations, strips of 3/4" plywood 8" wide cut to fit between the stud flanges works well.


Hope this helps

#8 of 12 tom derby

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Posted January 21 2004 - 04:27 AM

thanks for the info about the trim head screws, shoulda asked if there was anything out there a while ago.

#9 of 12 Luke D

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Posted January 21 2004 - 06:15 AM

Was at home depot last night and they now sell panels that you put on the floor. The panel is 2X2 with OSB on the top, and the bottom is a raised plastic so water under it won’t effect the wood. See this link http://www.subflor.c...oating-sys.html

#10 of 12 marc_manny

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Posted January 22 2004 - 01:43 AM

I know this is not HT specific, but I think this conversation is great for anyone thinking of putting a HT in the basement. Thanks for all the info.

I saw those also Luke. I would definately try them.

I am not looking to make a finished room in the basement, but just to wall off a section so when I do any wood working the saw dust does not get all over my furnace, boiler, washer/dryer, etc... Plus to keep my daughters little fingers away from any potential hospital visits.

Sloan:
How about if I painted the bottom rail first. Would that help keep it from rusting. I do not get water in my basement, but like I said I did notice when I pulled up the old basement flooring it was damaged from moisture.

How about the concrete sealer? I think it is like paint, but it is suppose to penitrate and fill in the concrete?

Thanks,
Marc

#11 of 12 sloan

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Posted January 22 2004 - 01:51 AM

Hey

I wouldn't bother painting the metal bottom track, however when you buy your metal studs and track you will notice that some studs and tracks have plain metal look others will be galvanized, (shiny). Try and get the galvanized metal studs and tracks. These are more resistant to rust than the non coated ones, (zinc I think), If you are still concerned about the moisture lay down a strip of builders foam used for sealing between a wood plate and the floor in new home construction, available in the insulation department of any home builders supply centre, fasten through the track and foam to the concrete floor, 6 mil vapour barrier or roofing paper would also work, As long as you use the zinc coated or galvaized studs and tracks you shouldn't have a problem.

Cheers.

#12 of 12 Cary_H

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Posted January 23 2004 - 01:14 PM

The dampness dilemma might be just be a result of less air circulation and lower temperature resulting in condensation. Unfinished basements don't often get the attention the rest of your home does HVAC-wise. Afterall, the majority of folks don't have much interest making rooms they don't frequent with any regularity comfortable.
The rotted floor might only be from one or two rare events where it never did dry completely afterwards.

Sloan said pretty much all that needs to be said around galvanized studs and tracks. The skills it requires are far easier to "get the hang of" for the Average Joe, and the measurements and cuts don't need to be anywhere near as accurate to suffice.
I framed for a couple of years where we used metal exclusively. Once you are cognizant of the number of different ways you do things differently than you do using wood, you'll never look back. Things like assembling corners, setting doorframes and doors, and hanging stuff on walls securely are done a tad differently, but a snap once you're up to speed.