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center channel stability


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5 replies to this topic

#1 of 6 BradD

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Posted November 25 2003 - 12:39 PM

I'm new to home audio but familiar with car audio. Most car audio amps are built for optimal performance (i.e. cleanest signal, no clipping, and no overheating) while running at a 4ohm load. When a 2ohm load is placed upon them, many begin clipping and/or overheating.

It's my understanding that most home audio amps are built for optimal performance while running at a 8ohm load. Generally speaking, do amps in A/V receivers, or separate amps for that matter, have any problems with stability with regards to pushing a center channel speaker rated a 4ohm?

I am considering the Denon 3803 and the Rocket RSC200.

Thanks
Brad

#2 of 6 ChrisWiggles

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Posted November 25 2003 - 01:17 PM

Depends on the capability of the receiver, and what you're trying to do (signal and volume). I wouldn't think it would be much of a problem on a denon 3803 unless you were trying to drive it full range at reference level like volumes. Most likely you'll have things set to small, so it probably won't be that huge a deal, but it will be putting more strain on your receiver. I would just take care to watch the volume dial especially on bassy music, or let the sub do the heavy lifting.

#3 of 6 BradD

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Posted November 25 2003 - 01:22 PM

Oh, I will mostly be using the center channel for HT use. I usually listen to music in two channel mode.

#4 of 6 BradD

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Posted November 25 2003 - 11:42 PM

ttt

#5 of 6 John S

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Posted November 26 2003 - 03:09 AM

With a sub, and the sub content out of the center channel, I'd go for it.

I run 10 speakers on my current 4802 setup with out issue at reference levels all the time. It has great air flow where I have it installed now though, but it didn't when I first installed it, and still no issues with it at all.

#6 of 6 Bob McElfresh

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Posted November 26 2003 - 03:59 AM

Quote:
It's my understanding that most home audio amps are built for optimal performance while running at a 8ohm load.

Well, they typically publish power specs with a 8 ohm load, but everyone knows speakers jump between about 2-20 ohms depending upon the frequency being played. The 8 ohms is the "nominal" impedence.

Keep in mind that a HT receiver from a major company is designed to produce XX watts from all 5 channels continous.

But with a movie, you dont often have all 5 speakers blaring at full volume for long periods of time. This usually leaves lots of overhead in the amp to handle things.

Just keep an eye on the temp and make sure to follow the manual guidelines about vent-space for the receiver. Low impedence -> higher current -> HEAT.

Another thing:

For HT it is important to try and make your front 3 speakers as identical as possible. More and more movies are sending dialog to the L/R speakers if the actors are shot at the extreme edges of the frame. If your center is a Rocket, and the L/R some other brand - it can blow the illusion of the sound source moving around.