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Need for HDTV antenna and HDTV tuner?


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4 replies to this topic

#1 of 5 Tien_N

Tien_N

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Posted November 25 2003 - 04:45 AM

I currently have a Hitachi Plasma (32HDT20) TV with the included Tuner box. It currently has Virtual HD built into the box which upconverts signals to 1080i?

My question is, if I were to purchase the Terk TV55 HD antenna, would I still need to buy an HD box tuner, like the Samsung box for example?

Could someone explain to me what would be the difference between an HDTV tuner box and Hitachi's own Virtual HD?

Thanks!

#2 of 5 Iver

Iver

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Posted November 25 2003 - 07:35 AM

Your television is an HDTV monitor, meaning it is capable of displaying signals at HDTV resolutions but requires an outboard HD signal source such as an OTA tuner, HD DSS tuner, an HD cable box, or an HD VCR.

The tuner included with the TV is NTSC only (standard broadcast).

The so-called VirtualHD feature appears to mean that the TV will bump lower resolution signals (standard broadcast, VCR, DVD, etc.) up to 1080i or one of the other HD levels.

By the way, you do not need an "HD antenna" to receive the OTA HD broadcasts.

You need the same type of antenna you would use to get good NTSC reception and that could mean anything from $3 rabbit ears to a tower-mounted beam with an RF signal amplifier.

Terk is just adding "HD" to their product in the hopes of enticing owners of HD OTA tuners.

The Terk antenna is probably much closer to rabbit ears in effectiveness than a good quality rooftop beam, but it may work fine for you.

It depends on the signal strength at your location.

#3 of 5 Tien_N

Tien_N

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Posted November 25 2003 - 08:04 AM

Thanks Iver for the info!

I guess I will have to put the HD tuner on my xmas list , hehe. Well a friend of mine has the Samsung T151 hd tuner hooked up to his plasma tv but he says the picture quality sucks with a basic $50 antenna. Plus he lives in a wooded area too, so would the Terk's amplified signal make it better?

Plus I live in an apt. complex , I don't have cable service, and I tried several antennas but the reception sucks on them compared to just plugging it into the wall (no cable service) but it seems to put out very clear over the air picture? The wall line is connected to the apt. complex front gate for us to view and the over-air channels are very clear (an antenna at office perhaps?) So do you think, I can just use the wall line to act as an antenna? Thanks again.

#4 of 5 Iver

Iver

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Posted November 25 2003 - 10:00 AM

No problem. Glad to be of help.

Most likely the in-wall antenna connection would work with an HD tuner, as long as it gives you solid reception.

If it connects to a single antenna that's distributed throughout the building, that should be fine. Whatever kind of feed it is, as long as it works on both VHF and UHF bands you will be covered for any kind of OTA HD frequency (channel).

My understanding of HD reception is that there's no in-between, you either have enough signal strength for your tuner to lock onto the digital broadcast or you get a blue screen. Other people here probably have experience with OTA HD tuners so they could probably tell you if it tends to usually require more or less signal strength than you would have with a situation where there is good reception of regular broadcast.

#5 of 5 Lew Crippen

Lew Crippen

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Posted November 26 2003 - 02:49 AM

Quote:
but he says the picture quality sucks with a basic $50 antenna. Plus he lives in a wooded area too, so would the Terk's amplified signal make it better?

The amplification will only amplify what is present already. It will be helpful if your friend’s problem is caused by signal loss due to a long cable run. But if the problem is that he is not picking up a good (consistently stong for digital) signal to begin with, the amplification will not help—basically you can only amplify what you are given at the start—you will only have a stronger, bad signal, if that makes sense.

Your friend might need something like a Channel Master on a roof mount.

I have no direct experience with Trek, but many people have found suitable antennas at a better price point.
¡Time is not my master!