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Can component cables be used as coaxil cables?


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5 replies to this topic

#1 of 6 Tommy_N

Tommy_N

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Posted November 23 2003 - 01:45 AM

Hello all,

I'm playing around with my set-up and I need some RCA cables. I don't have any lying around, but I do have component cables.

Can I use them to transmit regular RCA (coaxial or whatever you call it) audio signals? I know regular RCA cables won't transmit component signals (at least not to the max potential) but can they be used the other way around?

Thanks

Tom

#2 of 6 Chu Gai

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Posted November 23 2003 - 02:14 AM

Yes, you can use your component cables as interconnects say between an amp and a preamp. As far as the other way around perhaps you can elaborate a bit.

#3 of 6 Tommy_N

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Posted November 23 2003 - 01:11 PM

Chu Gai,

Thanks for the response.

By "other way around" I mean that it is my understanding that I could not use composite cables to connect the component output on my DVD player to my TV.

Is that correct? Or will any wire with RCA jacks transmit the Luminance (Y) and color (Pb and Pr) signals?

Thanks

Tom

BTW - My main goal is just be able to connect my cable box to my Receiver. Presently it goes to my VCR and then the VCR goes to the Receiver.

#4 of 6 ChrisWiggles

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Posted November 23 2003 - 02:57 PM

Basically, almost all these wires, that are labeled different things are coaxial cables(some are twisted pair, some are just weird). The only caveat is that video cables, and digital audio interconnects (digital coax) should be 75ohms. So ANY 75ohm video cable, or digital coaxial cable, or whatever it's labeled as, as long as it's 75ohm, can be used for anything. The converse, however, MAY not be true. Audio interconnects, while they are often just the same cable, 75ohm (it's probably easier to produce just a whole bunch of the same stuff, and sell it under different labels), MIGHT not be 75ohm, so can cause ghosting and such for video, because of resistance mis-match.

So you can use what are labeled composite video cables (which should be 75ohm), times 3, and they work fine as component. The ONLY thing you have to worry about is using audio cables (that are not expressly labeled 75ohm) for video or digital coax. It will still work, but it may cause problems, especially with video. Hope that helps. Posted Image

#5 of 6 Chu Gai

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Posted November 23 2003 - 04:21 PM

Audio interconnects can be made in a variety of ways as perhaps you've seen when browsing around looking at some of the cable mongers. For example, an audio interconnect can be made using coax (it doesn't have to be 75 ohms) or one can use twisted pair (look at some of the interconnects that you might find at car stereo places). There's nothing special going on here and for home use one could use either one with success. The way it generally goes with the components that are being hooked up, is that you've got a source that has a low impedance being connected to a destination that has a high input impedance. In these usual situations, the gauge of the wire doesn't matter and if your lengths are only several meters, nothing else matters. Nothing.

With digital coax, the cable is usually 75 ohms. However, it doesn't have to be. One could, and it's been done, use a coathanger for the digital coax. Fascinating isn't it?

Quote:
By "other way around" I mean that it is my understanding that I could not use composite cables to connect the component output on my DVD player to my TV.

Is that correct? Or will any wire with RCA jacks transmit the Luminance (Y) and color (Pb and Pr) signals?
I wouldn't. One can get 75 ohm cables with more bandwidth than your DVD player can output for 10 bucks or so. Seems inexpensive enough for me.

#6 of 6 Tommy_N

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Posted November 23 2003 - 04:28 PM

As always the responses are much appreciated.

Tom