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#1 of 8 OFFLINE   Greg Kerber

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Posted October 12 2003 - 09:08 AM

First off, read some contradictory info on whether I can/should hook up my DVD/CD player to my rcver with both digital coax and analog at same time? please clarify

Second, just bought a an HK AVR320 and a set of Dalquist QX6's and the QX50 center to go along with my present front speakers. Stupid question, do I use my surrounds for listening to CD's, and if so on what setting on my rcver. Although I bought the rcver to get HT I actually listen to music more than movies. Will this fact also effect the location of my surrounds, would I still want them so far above listeners ears?.
As well what setting do I use to watch basic TV coming from a satellite dish?

#2 of 8 OFFLINE   ChrisLazarko

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Posted October 12 2003 - 09:27 AM

Well for CD's you can use a variety of things. I own a Harman/Kardon AVR-225 with some bookshelves (Klipsch) and I prefer to keep everything on Logic7 (a different approach to Dolby ProLogic II developed by Lexicon, Harman/Kardons sister company.)

I would experiment around with which settings you like the best. Also remember that with any Analog (red and white) connection you can turn that into a full 5.1 surround sound piece, although it won't be as good as a TRUE 5.1 signal like DTS or Dolby Digital 5.1.

Most people would prefer just either 2ch. stereo for there CD's, some say it sounds better, more crisp or what not.

For TV type programs go ahead and try out either Dolby ProLogic II or Logic7 Cinema, I think you will like those both, usually for movies you will hear alot of surround effects. One thing I did notice for both of those is that you should raise your rear's volume level unless you are sitting VERY VERY close to them as it won't produce alot of extra sound... just somehting you should check into.

As for your question regarding both analog and digital cables together I see absolutely no need unless your DTV box won't output everything through the digital cable. (Cablevision's digital cable will only put DD5.1 signals through digital and everything else will remain analog). If you see a need to do this then you can, but if you do not have a problem using just digital then keep with digital only.

#3 of 8 OFFLINE   Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Posted October 12 2003 - 04:06 PM

Greg,

First, welcome to the Forum!

Quote:
First off, read some contradictory info on whether I can/should hook up my DVD/CD player to my rcver with both digital coax and analog at same time? please clarify
Unfortunately you didn’t tell us what the conflicting information was, so it’s impossible to know what you want clarified.

That said, how you connect your CD/DVD player depends on a number of things, including your receiver’s capabilities, and how you intend to use it.

Fundamentally, the DVD player only needs a digital connection, not analog. However, many receivers allow pre-set surround sound modes to be assigned for each input – that is, a particular surround mode is automatically called up whenever you select a particular input.

If your receiver is like that, you may want to use both analog and digital connections. Then you could assign the digital connection to the DVD input, pre-set for 5.1 Dolby Digital surround. Simultaneously, you could send the analog signal to the CD input, pre-set for no surround sound (which most people prefer for music playback) or a “Hall” mode (or similar).

If your receiver does not allow modes to be pre-set for the selected input – that is, you have to manually select the mode each time you select an input – then go ahead and use the digital input only.

Regarding your other questions, surround sound modes are more important for movies than for music, so optimize your surround speakers locations for movies. For regular TV programming, use Dolby Pro-Logic mode.

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Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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#4 of 8 OFFLINE   ChrisWiggles

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Posted October 12 2003 - 05:57 PM

Keep in mind too that if you use an analog connection (for CDs here, you NEED to use the digital connection for DVDs), then you are using the DAC's in the player. Whereas if you use digital for CD playback, decoding is happening with the receiver's DACs. One may sound better than the other, you may want to experiment with each and see.

#5 of 8 OFFLINE   Greg Kerber

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Posted October 13 2003 - 08:27 AM

Thanks for the info and the welcome, sorry for the unclear question. As to the digital/analog hookups, what i was referring to was some posts I read said that I need to hook up the analog outputs on my CD player (using my DVD as CD player) to my rcver even if I have the digital coax hooked up. This never even occurrred to me but when I reviewed my rcver instruction manual it also made a reference to having the analog hooked up as a back up but it is not very clear as to why.

As to my surround speakers, being new to HT it seems such a waste to have such nice sounding speakers and not use them for anything but the limited sounds produced during movies. I have seen reviews of HT systems and they often refer to the systems abilities with music tracks, so are they only referring to the front speakers? They also are quite large to position them so high up the wall but I will just have to expereiment with locations. Thanks again for info.

#6 of 8 OFFLINE   ChrisWiggles

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Posted October 13 2003 - 10:16 AM

it seems such a waste to have such nice sounding speakers and not use them for anything but the limited sounds produced during movies.


This is a normal tendency, however, i think it is the wrong attitude to take. You can say the same thing for subwoofers, or equalization, etc. For instance: "gee, i spent so much on this REALLY nice subwoofer, so i want to turn it up REALLY loud, so as not to "waste" it." (this was my initial reaction when i got my SVS, but i quickly realized, that this was NOT how music sounds, and promptly calibrated it well. It is now hardly noticiable, but it is NOT going to waste. Using all of it all the time makes the sound WORSE, even though you may "have" more.)

Unfortunately, this attitude is usually not the best path to take. You want to reproduce, hopefully, an accurate representation of the music. This involves setting your sub accurately, not loudly, or boomy, etc. I digress.

Anyway, my point is that most people will tell you to keep it in 2-channel for music. I would tend to agree with them. This is not to say that you *shouldn't* or *never should* use processing to create a surround soundfield for music. You should try it and see what you prefer. I find staying true to the mix most often leads to the best results (for ME). By all means play around, experiment, and just use what you want, when you want. Just keep in mind that you don't want to approach things from the perspective of "gee i have all this stuff, i better use it all to 'get my money's worth.'" This can lead to the most unrealistic, and worst sounding system or playback. Just my two cents, and have fun!

Oh, and also keep in mind some processing is different than others. Some of the better music unfolded into surround came from meridian processing. On pink floyd it worked very well. On other music I probably would have found it distracting.

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#7 of 8 OFFLINE   Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Posted October 13 2003 - 12:24 PM

Quote:
Just keep in mind that you don't want to approach things from the perspective of "gee i have all this stuff, i better use it all to 'get my money's worth.'"
I agree with Chris 100 percent. I’ve seen people get a 1/3-octave equalizer for their sub, then complain, “I’m only using six or seven bands. All those others are going to waste.” Never mind that the equalizer did exactly what it was supposed to – make the sub sound better.

Funny, receivers these days are laden with features, and no one seems to feel bad about not using all of them!

That said, the rear speakers technically don’t have to be a good as the fronts. But I would “downsize” no further than say, getting a smaller version from the same series as the fronts. You sure don’t want go with something as “cheezy” as say, intercom speakers with the rears. As I once heard a HT salesman say, "When that jet flies over, you don't want it so sound like a Piper Cub when it gets to the rear!"

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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#8 of 8 OFFLINE   JawhnM

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Posted October 14 2003 - 03:07 AM

I agree with Chris and Wayne, more is not necessarily better. Using different settings for music and TV all depends on your tastes. Experiment, if YOU like it use it, only YOU can decide.

One comment regarding the surrounds, once they are calibrated for EQUAL sound all around (which the should be), DON'T play with the volume levels. That's why you calibrate them in the first place. On most programing there's not much coming from the surrounds (on purpose). The surrounds are used mostly for ambient sounds, special effects and to create a more open space. Most of the time if your regularly noticing the surrounds, there to loud.
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