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"Raymond" salary wars


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37 replies to this topic

#1 of 38 EricW

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Posted August 26 2003 - 06:34 AM

what do you think of the salary wars going on at Everybody Loves Raymond? for those of you who don't know, Brad Garret is holding out and refusing to report to work because he feels his salary is too low (he's making ~$150,00 per episode). his contract has reportedly been reworked twice in the last 4 years. all the other main players (aside from Romano) are unhappy with their contracts too.

now while i believe people should get as much as they can get - i have no problem at all with Keanu getting $150mill+ (or whatever it was) for Matrix movies or Alex Rodriguez getting $25m per year, but i believe you have to honour your contract. if Garrett is unhappy with his contract, he should be mad at the producers, he should be mad at his agents.
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#2 of 38 MickeS

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Posted August 26 2003 - 07:24 AM

I agree, if the contract says he'll make $150,000, then that's what he should make until the contract expires, unless both parties want to renegotiate.

In these cases it's hard for me to feel sympathetic to eithe rpart. You have a guy who makes more in one season than I'll probably make in my entire lifetime on one side, and a moneyhungry studio who knows they'll earn even more if they keep his contract the way it is on the other.

/Mike
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#3 of 38 Daniel Kikin

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Posted August 26 2003 - 08:15 AM

It's the same thing in sports, people sign contracts and then hold out for more money before the contract expires. It's one thing if the studio offers to renegotiate (in some cases i.e. Alias, that's the smart and right move), but if not, a contract should be honored to the end. Once it expires, that's a different story.

#4 of 38 Lew Crippen

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Posted August 26 2003 - 08:29 AM

These guys do this because they can. In this case Garret runs the risk that he will be considered to be more of a pain than he is worth and he either gets dropped from the show or sued for breach of contract or both. Naturally he (and his agent) think that he won’t be viewed as too difficult to satisfy and that more salary concessions will be made.

A big difference for fringe TV actors and most of the rest of the working world is that a hit TV series will likely never occur again, so some of them try to maximize their earnings while they can. Also most of these guys are never going to be more than marginally employed in the future, so to be considered a pain is not that big a deal. And if someone really wants you, all is forgiven in any case. Even then there is a risk—look at the thread in movies concerning Deborah Winger who has had her carrear somewhat marginalized just because of rumors of being difficult.
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#5 of 38 Malcolm R

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Posted August 26 2003 - 08:41 AM

I yearn for the days when a contract was a contract and people had enough backbone to fulfill the terms of their agreement without bitching and moaning. If you don't like the salary, don't sign the contract. Period. Once it's executed in writing, shut the hell up and do your job. Posted Image
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#6 of 38 Mikel_Cooperman

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Posted August 26 2003 - 12:38 PM

Why, oh why do these Hollywood types, who are making more than I ever will always think that suddenly that they dont have to show up for work anymore because they arent making enough?
The list of celebrities that did this is a mile long. From Farrah To Caruso to Suzanne Sommers...

It all comes down to inflated egos and most learn a Big Huge lesson in the end.

#7 of 38 Morgan Jolley

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Posted August 26 2003 - 12:51 PM

Keanu actually got $30 million for The Matrix sequels, then gave that to the SFX team so they could finish the films under budget, but got 10% of the overall grosses in return (which means he got a LOT more than $30 million, just not as quickly).

I think more actors should be making contracts that have terms regarding how much they get based on the success of a show. So if a show bombs, they don't get much, but if it becomes a huge success (either ratings-wise or through awards) their salaries increase. They should also understand what a contract means (you sign it, you follow it).

#8 of 38 Ricardo C

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Posted August 26 2003 - 01:20 PM

While I can understand Garret's issues (even though the man is FAR FAR FUCKING FAR from making little money), the truth of the matter is that he signed a contract. If he wants to re-negotiate, he's free to try, but that doesn't mean he can go on strike.

One sitcom star who REALLY played it smart was Paul Reiser: In the early days of Mad ABout You, when he was the bigger star in the show, he had it included in his contract that he would be paid whatever Helen Hunt made, an idea which paid off VERY handsomely once she became a superstar.

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#9 of 38 Adam Lenhardt

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Posted August 26 2003 - 02:16 PM

Quote:
While I can understand Garret's issues (even though the man is FAR FAR FUCKING FAR from making little money), the truth of the matter is that he signed a contract. If he wants to re-negotiate, he's free to try, but that doesn't mean he can go on strike.
He just did, and has apparently won out with the desired paycheck. However, just because he won the battle, he may have just sacrificed himself for the war. After antics like these, he'll be lucky to be hired again. Especially considering the limited number of roles that are availiable to a man of his larger-than-average stature.

#10 of 38 Patrick Sun

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Posted August 26 2003 - 03:54 PM

James Gandolfini, anyone?
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#11 of 38 Phil Kim

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Posted August 26 2003 - 04:13 PM

I want to take Brad Garret's side.

In all likelihood, when the contract was signed, he had much less bargaining power. So he pretty much took what he can get. Let's face it, he's as important to the show as other supporting actors. The show will likely fold in about a season or two, so he had to do what he had to do. He took the risk and won.

#12 of 38 MickeS

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Posted August 26 2003 - 04:47 PM

The show will likely fold in about a season or two, so he had to do what he had to do.

Because God knows how he'd survive on only 6 million dollars. To put that in perspective, if you made $100K a year, it would take 60 years to earn that much money. I can surely understand why he'd have to break the contract and go on strike for that paltry sum of money. Posted Image
/Mike

#13 of 38 Dave Miller

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Posted August 27 2003 - 12:59 AM

Quote:
In all likelihood, when the contract was signed, he had much less bargaining power. So he pretty much took what he can get.


And when it is time to renegotiate, he'll have more bargaining power. In the mean time, live with the contract you signed.

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#14 of 38 Malcolm R

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Posted August 27 2003 - 02:15 AM

There was some talk about spinning off Garrett's character when the current show ends. I'm sure that's been filed away in the "When Pigs Fly" drawer now.

As others said, hopefully he manages his money well because it's likely his last big payday ever.

James Gandolfini, anyone?

Unfortunately the network caved in to him as well. Just once, I'd like to see more than empty threats come from these networks. The star doesn't want to work? Fine. Shut the show down and put the whole cast/crew in the unemployment line.

What's the point of even having contracts anymore? No one honors or enforces them anyway. They're just worthless paper.
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#15 of 38 Adam Tyner

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Posted August 27 2003 - 02:58 AM

Quote:
Unfortunately the network caved in to him as well. Just once, I'd like to see more than empty threats come from these networks. The star doesn't want to work? Fine. Shut the show down and put the whole cast/crew in the unemployment line.

Isn't that kind of like having an annoying house guest and, to get rid of them, torching your home? I'm sure the networks intensely dislike scenarios like this, but why throw away countless millions of dollars in ad revenue, destroy relationships with reasonable employees, etc., etc., etc., all because an actor or two is giving you a hard time?

#16 of 38 brentl

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Posted August 27 2003 - 03:09 AM

"And when it is time to renegotiate, he'll have more bargaining power. In the mean time, live with the contract you signed."

Hmm couldn't have said it better!!

Brent

#17 of 38 Jeff Kleist

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Posted August 27 2003 - 03:17 AM

Brad Garrett has one of the most annoying grating voices in television. He has a lifetime of Hollywood squares and toilet paper commercials ahead of him, which he started early anyway.

#18 of 38 GordonL

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Posted August 27 2003 - 04:15 AM

Here's the whole story:

- Garrett is making about half of what Roberts, Boyle, and Heaton are making.
- Apparently, R, B, & H had contracts for nine seasons, G's was for eight.
- None of the co-stars had a piece of the syndication rights which has a potential worth of $500m+.
- The producers and Romano have indicated that it's possible there may not be a ninth season because they want the show to go out on top.
- R, B, & H have agreed to new deals which give them some of the syndication profits.
- G is holding out for salary and syndication profits.

I suspect if you guys were in Garrett's shoes, you would probably do the same. Posted Image

#19 of 38 Jason Seaver

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Posted August 27 2003 - 04:21 AM

Quote:
Unfortunately the network caved in to him as well. Just once, I'd like to see more than empty threats come from these networks.
It has happened; it just goes to show how much leverage the stars have. Remember the last, Detla Burke-less season of Designing Women? Coy and Vance on The Dukes Of Hazard? That godawful last year of Sliders?

For the most part, stars are what the audience identifies with a show. Occasionally, a show can weather losing a star or featured character, but TV audiences are fickle and will often turn away.

Perhaps the only time I recall this working was when the stars of Dick Wolf's New York Undercover (for a while, one of Fox's most popular shows) held out for more money. The next day, Wolf had ads out in Variety (he must have been wondering if these guys had been paying attention to Law & Order's revolving door), and the cast quickly caved.
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#20 of 38 Adam Lenhardt

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Posted August 27 2003 - 04:43 AM

Quote:
I suspect if you guys were in Garrett's shoes, you would probably do the same.Posted Image
No, I wouldn't. I would honor the contract I signed, knowing that it's worth more than many make in a lifetime.

As for why Roberts, Boyle, and Heaton just got a cut of the syndication profits: could it be that its because they showed up to do their jobs?

(BTW, Garrett was already offered a significant pay raise and a cut of the syndication profits. He turned it down for more. Meanwhile, his character will remain on his honeymoon indefinitelyPosted Image)


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