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Questions about building a seating platform


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25 replies to this topic

#1 of 26 Andres Munoz

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Posted August 19 2003 - 08:20 AM

I should mention the layout of my basement first. Please bear with me. It's 36'x13'. I built a front wall 4 feet from the the wall that faces the front of the house. The TV, equipment rack and DVD rack are built into this front wall. The 4 feet in between gives me access to the back of the equipment.

The HT extends 18' from the newly built front wall. The remaining 14' will be some sort of lobby/family room.

There is no back wall in the HT. A curtain will separate the HT and the lobby. The reason for that is that I'd like to use most of the lenght of the basement for when I have family gatherings or parties with friends, and I wouldn't be able to do that if I had a wall there. With the curtain, I just slide it to the side and the whole thing is opened up.

Onto my questions now:

I bought 4 used theater chairs and want to start planning the building of a platform for them. But here's the thing: Since my HT will also serve as a party room, I'd like all seating (a sofa and the theater chairs) to be able to be moved to the side walls (parallel to them).

I'd like to be able to push the platform to one of the side walls and for that reason, I can't permanently screw the platform to the floor.
Has anyone done anything like that?

My second question has to do with installing bass shakers to the platform. Any ideas on how to install them so they're not that visible but I can still have easy access to them? (While keeping in mind that I might need to move the platform to a side wall).

Pretty challenging huh? Any suggestions?
Andres


#2 of 26 Trace Ahlers

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Posted August 19 2003 - 08:45 AM

I suggest putting low profile rollers on the bottom of the platform. Is the floor carpeted?
As for the bass shakers, I mounted mine underneath the platform and then wired them to a Radio Shack multi speaker connector plate and then mounted the plate into a cutout on the platform. The speaker wires coming from the amp are plugged into that via banana plugs.
Trace

#3 of 26 Andres Munoz

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Posted August 19 2003 - 09:32 AM

Yeah Trace, the floor is carpeted. Rollers huh? Interesting. I'll keep that in mind. But wouldn't the platform move (roll around) when people step in it to sit down?

As far as the shakers, yeah I was thinking about a connector plate as well. But if something is not working and you need to check the connection AT the bass shaker, do you have to remove the seats and the top of the platform in order to get to the shakers?
Andres


#4 of 26 Jay Mitchosky

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Posted August 19 2003 - 02:28 PM

Quote:
I'd like to use most of the lenght of the basement for when I have family gatherings or parties with friends, and I wouldn't be able to do that if I had a wall there. With the curtain, I just slide it to the side and the whole thing is opened up.
A recent HT magazine showed a theater with the same concept executed to brilliant effect. I'll try and find that mag so I can reference it for you. The theater was in Toronto and has a really cool layout. Curtains close around the back and side of the theater to separate from the rest of the room, which houses a bar and lobby. A lot of acoustic challenges but really nice.
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#5 of 26 Andres Munoz

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Posted August 20 2003 - 01:12 AM

Thanks Jay.
Andres


#6 of 26 MikeWh

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Posted August 20 2003 - 01:23 AM

Quote:
But wouldn't the platform move (roll around) when people step in it to sit down?
What about locking casters? The only problem with these is that you won't be able to hide them under the platform as easily, because you need to be able to access the locking mechanism.
http://www.rockler.c....catid=28&DID=6

It's common to install just 2 of the 4 casters as a locking type. The other two can typically roll freely. This would make it easier to lock and unlock the platform. Also, the side with the non-locking casters could be constructed to better hide those wheels.

For this or any other wheel, you just have to make sure you don't exceed their load ratings. For four of these casters, you can support approx. 1000lbs (assuming they are properly installed and equally support the platform).

#7 of 26 Andres Munoz

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Posted August 20 2003 - 01:45 AM

Thanks for the link Mike.
Andres


#8 of 26 BenSC

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Posted August 20 2003 - 01:46 AM

How heavy is this thing going to be? If it's carpet, get some of those $5 furniture movers shaped like upside down frisbies. Slide 4 of them under the corners and push away. Then there are no problems with it moving on it's own, either.
- Ben

#9 of 26 Andres Munoz

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Posted August 20 2003 - 02:13 AM

Well, that's what I wanted to know. Since I might need to move it, how should I build this thing? Is it OK if it's not that heavy? What type of insulation or what happens if I don't put insulation?
Andres


#10 of 26 Mark McGill

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Posted August 20 2003 - 03:06 AM

I've just finished building my riser. It's approximately 12'x6'. By the time you use 2"x10" joice and base, plus two sheets of 3/4" flooring, plus a little carpet, then put chairs etc on it, that sucka weighs alot. Mines on carpet and I estimate it weighs around 500-600lbs including a couch. Keep in mind it is alot harder to move anything on carpet. Good luck.

#11 of 26 Andres Munoz

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Posted August 20 2003 - 05:07 AM

500 lbs? Heck no! Posted Image
I can't make mine that heavy.
Andres


#12 of 26 MikeWh

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Posted August 20 2003 - 05:22 AM

I think BenSC wins for most economical/easiest idea to implement. Posted Image Much better than rollers/casters, as long as the sliders don't tear up your carpet. The weight of the riser should keep the sliders from moving around too much, when people are stepping up and down on the thing. The sliders also distribute the weight better than the bottoms of wheels. I'd try to find a relatively large one... say 4" or more in diameter and make feet for the riser that are big enough to use as much of the slider's surface area as possible. Depending on how wide the riser is, you might want to use 6 feet (3 along the front and 3 along the back).

Here's a link to what we're talking about:
http://www.alltvstuff.com/mm1.html

I seem to recall Home Depot and Lowes carried things that are similar to theses, but not sure if they have them this big.

Apparently, they're also available at Office Depot:
http://www.officedep...el=SK&id=283822

#13 of 26 Andres Munoz

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Posted August 20 2003 - 05:34 AM

Yeah, sliders are a good idea too. Thanks.
Andres


#14 of 26 Trace Ahlers

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Posted August 20 2003 - 09:40 AM

Mike has the right idea.
As for your connections, I had the same concern.
I just triple-checked all the wiring and the connectors before closing it all up. If your platform is movable, you could always tip it over if you had to.
Trace

#15 of 26 Jay Mitchosky

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Posted August 20 2003 - 11:59 PM

Quote:
What type of insulation or what happens if I don't put insulation?

No insulation = big boom box. It can actually act like a bass trap. You want that puppy to be acoustically inert so it will need to be stuffed solid with insulation. Basic soundproofing type I think is the recommendation (ie. not exterior pink). Others can comment on the actual type.
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#16 of 26 MikeWh

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Posted August 21 2003 - 12:28 AM

Quote:
No insulation = big boom box. It can actually act like a bass trap.

I'm wondering how the special design considerations of a moveable riser might impact the "traditional" problems encountered with one affixed to the floor.

If it's not physically connected to the floor (has no bottom), then the acoustic properties should be more like a bongo (drum with no bottom), than a kettle drum (a solid drum with a reverberating head)... like a huge speaker enclosure with a humongous port (one side missing!!).

I'm wondering how that would change the properties that we are used to seeing with permanent risers.... anyone want to tackle that????

#17 of 26 Andres Munoz

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Posted August 21 2003 - 12:46 AM

Yeah Mike, great question.

What accoustic properties would a platform with no bottom have?

I have some other questions:

Would it rattle too much with no bottom?
If a movable platform has no bottom, how can I stuff it with insulation?
Can the pink insulation be used? Is that not good enough?
Andres


#18 of 26 MikeWh

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Posted August 21 2003 - 02:26 AM

Quote:
Would it rattle too much with no bottom?
Do you mean rattling between the members of the superstructure?? As long as it was well constructed, I don't think that'll be a problem-- glue & screw, glue & screw, glue and screw.... can't emphasize that enough.

Quote:
If a movable platform has no bottom, how can I stuff it with insulation?
That's why I'm interested in the sound properties. You could design it to have a solid bottom, but it would add to the weight and I feel would increase the problems of it being a resonance box, now that it has two flexing surfaces (a top and bottom... like a snare or bass drum). If you don't add a solid bottom, you have to hold insulation in there in some other fashion--- like using cloth on the bottom (somewhat like a couch) or perhaps strapping.... but I'm not sure that would make the platform any better acoustically... I just don't know.

Quote:
Can the pink insulation be used? Is that not good enough?
Others here have used it in their acoustic panels. I'd like to see what the acousticians here have to say about all this first....

#19 of 26 Andres Munoz

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Posted August 21 2003 - 02:55 AM

So Mike...should I use glue in addition to screws? Posted Image

I will also be waiting for the experts to chime in.
Andres


#20 of 26 MikeWh

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Posted August 21 2003 - 09:17 AM

Yes, glue/screw/glue/screw/glue/screw. Posted Image

(Sounds like a Mel Brooks routine).
King Louis: Hump or Death? Hump or Death?? Hump/death/hump/death?
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