-

Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Movies that are worth remaking?


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
62 replies to this topic

#1 of 63 OFFLINE   Eric Peterson

Eric Peterson

    Screenwriter

  • 2,959 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 02 2001

Posted July 11 2003 - 12:50 AM

First off, I want to start by saying that I am a classic movie lover and hate nothing more than seeing the legacy of a great movie destroyed by a shoddy remake.

That said, I do believe that there are valid reasons for remaking a film.
  • Great Idea, Poorly Executed (i.e. Not a good movie the first time)
  • Limitations due to Censorship
  • Limitations due to technology
  • Drastic differences from the source material (i.e. Book or Play)
This topic arises quite often in various threads and sometimes gets quite ugly. Like it or not, the studios are going to continue to do this, because they believe there is a built-in audience and money. Also, there is a history of movies that have had very good remakes.
  • The Maltese Falcon (This was the 3rd time that this story was filmed)
  • Lolita (Personally, I like the remake because it removed the limitations from Kubrick's)
  • Psycho (Just Kidding)
  • The Man Who Knew Too Much (Hitchcock made this twice)
  • Countless others that have slipped my mind.
Anyway, back to the original point of my thread. Are there any movies that you've seen that you wish somebody would remake.

The one that struck me was Capra's "Lost Horizon". This movie was so butchered over the years and had many technical limitations. I could imagine this movie being amazing today.

I'm sure I'll think of others that I've seen, but I thought this would be an interesting topic.

#2 of 63 OFFLINE   KyleK

KyleK

    Second Unit

  • 439 posts
  • Join Date: Jan 11 2001

Posted July 11 2003 - 08:52 AM

Battlefield Earth
Planet of the Apes

#3 of 63 OFFLINE   Magnus T

Magnus T

    Supporting Actor

  • 683 posts
  • Join Date: Jan 26 2003

Posted July 11 2003 - 09:27 AM

Lawrence of Arabia. Posted Image
There is no spoon...
but there is a fork with a cork!

#4 of 63 OFFLINE   John Watson

John Watson

    Screenwriter

  • 1,937 posts
  • Join Date: Jul 14 2002

Posted July 11 2003 - 09:58 AM

Sometimes I want to see a movie that is out of circulation remade, so that I can finally see it Posted Image

Some other times I think a remake that is poorly regarded should be redone, well, such as The Crucible, without the excruciating politically correct updating a la Demi Moore.

I understand Great Expectations with Gwyneth Paltrow was almost as bad.

Good thread!

#5 of 63 OFFLINE   Dennis Nicholls

Dennis Nicholls

    Lead Actor

  • 7,790 posts
  • Join Date: Oct 05 1998
  • Real Name:Dennis
  • LocationBoise, ID

Posted July 11 2003 - 12:36 PM

Oh dear I really love Alexander Nevsky but the sound is terrible - Stalin insisted they use USSR-built sound equipment exclusively......Posted Image There have been some "half-remakes" with new orchestral recordings patched in but leaving the original spoken dialog. This is only partly successful...
Feline videophiles Condoleezza and Dukie.


#6 of 63 OFFLINE   Jason Seaver

Jason Seaver

    Lead Actor

  • 9,306 posts
  • Join Date: Dec 31 1969

Posted July 11 2003 - 01:58 PM

Every once in a while, I'll flip past TCM and wonder what I'd do if tasked with remaking a movie. The most fun I've ever had with the idea was while watching Goodbye Charlie (Switch was an uncredited remake, but it's just painful to watch).
Jay's Movie Blog - A movie-viewing diary.
Transplanted Life: Sci-fi soap opera about a man placed in a new body, updated two or three times a week.
Trading Post Inn - Another gender-bending soap, with different collaborators writing different points of view.

"What? Since when was this an energy...

#7 of 63 OFFLINE   Dan Hitchman

Dan Hitchman

    Screenwriter

  • 2,714 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 11 1999

Posted July 11 2003 - 05:13 PM

If they were worth remaking in the first place... why remake them? Let the classics stand on their own.

Posted Image

Dan

#8 of 63 OFFLINE   John Thomas

John Thomas

    Screenwriter

  • 2,636 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 23 2000

Posted July 11 2003 - 05:51 PM

I recently heard that there was a remake of Guess Who's Coming To Dinner? in the works. The original was great and ground-breaking for its day. A remake seems to be in bad taste, maybe as another Wesley Snipes movie.

Posted Image

#9 of 63 OFFLINE   Scott_lb

Scott_lb

    Supporting Actor

  • 592 posts
  • Join Date: Oct 07 2002

Posted July 11 2003 - 06:26 PM

The Phantom Menace
"My name is El Nino which in spanish means.... The Nino!" - Chris Farley

#10 of 63 OFFLINE   John Thomas

John Thomas

    Screenwriter

  • 2,636 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 23 2000

Posted July 11 2003 - 07:04 PM

Posted Image

#11 of 63 OFFLINE   Eric Peterson

Eric Peterson

    Screenwriter

  • 2,959 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 02 2001

Posted July 12 2003 - 04:22 AM

Good thread!


Thanks, I thought it would be interesting.

If they were worth remaking in the first place... why remake them? Let the classics stand on their own.


I agree completely. I stated that in the first line of my post. But there are movies with great ideas that didn't cut it.
------
Waterworld was another movie with a great idea, but just an absolutely awful movie.

#12 of 63 OFFLINE   Mike Broadman

Mike Broadman

    Producer

  • 4,956 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 24 2001

Posted July 12 2003 - 08:11 AM

I always wondered what Logan's Run would look like in the hands of a modern, restrained, competent film maker.

I remember hearing rumours that Affleck and Lopez were goint to remake Casablanca. Please tell me this is just a rumour? Heck, I'd probably rent it just for laughs.

#13 of 63 OFFLINE   Brad Porter

Brad Porter

    Screenwriter

  • 1,757 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 08 1999

Posted July 12 2003 - 08:36 AM

Quote:
Some other times I think a remake that is poorly regarded should be redone, well, such as The Crucible, without the excruciating politically correct updating a la Demi Moore.

I think you're confused. Demi Moore was in The Scarlet Letter. The Crucible featured Daniel Day-Lewis, Winona Ryder, Paul Scofield, and Joan Allen and was rather highly regarded for its performances, although the audiences stayed away. There was no politically correct updating done, since Arthur Miller personally adapted his own play into the filmed screenplay.

I haven't seen Moore's version of The Scarlet Letter. I wasn't particularly pleased with being forced to read it in high school, so the film would be rather low on my need-to-see list.

As for remakes that I'd like to see:

Key Largo: There's nothing at all wrong with the original film, but it provides an opportunity for a good filmmaker to really update the material. The basic formula is good guys and bad guys sitting in a hotel during a hurricane. Back when Quentin Tarantino was very buzzworthy, I thought that a remake of this film would be great for him because of his natural ability to write compelling dialogue between criminals who are just sitting around. I still think it could work. This is in the category of "using the basic plot and characters of a previous film and writing a whole new screenplay". Sort of like the relationship between Tombstone and Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

Death Race 2000: I know it would be next to impossible to keep the source material from being butchered to avoid hand wringing and moralizing over whether the film encourages killing pedestrians, but the right director could do some interesting things with this plot. This would be in the category of "taking the cheese out of a cool idea and injecting some updated effects and filmmaking techniques". This is kind of what was attempted with the remake of Gone in 60 Seconds, but I personally don't consider Dominic Sena or Michael Bay or Simon West to be the right director for this material. Give me George Miller or Sam Raimi instead. This could also work for The Gumball Rally or Cannonball (not The Cannonball Run).

I'm also hoping that The Alamo remake turns out well, because I'm hungry for a good Western drama. The last one I can recall that wasn't made for TV was Wyatt Earp, and that was 1994.

Brad
We apologise for the unnecessary truncation and lack of formatting control in the signature. Those responsible should be sacked.

Mynd you, møøse bites Kan be pretty nasti...

#14 of 63 ONLINE   Lou Sytsma

Lou Sytsma

    Producer

  • 5,265 posts
  • Join Date: Nov 01 1998

Posted July 12 2003 - 01:34 PM

Phantom Menace
Attack of the Clones
The Hulk
Daredevil
Every man is my superior, in that I may learn from him.

#15 of 63 OFFLINE   Dan Shogren

Dan Shogren

    Stunt Coordinator

  • 185 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 16 2003

Posted July 12 2003 - 03:46 PM

The omega man, or the last man on earth, because I AM LEGEND deserves a good film adaptation.

#16 of 63 OFFLINE   Patrick McCart

Patrick McCart

    Lead Actor

  • 7,471 posts
  • Join Date: May 16 2001
  • Real Name:Patrick McCart
  • LocationAlpharetta, GA, USA

Posted July 12 2003 - 07:31 PM

Sh! The Octopus

Posted ImagePosted Image

Hugh Herbert in the original, Chris Kattan in the remake. Posted Image

#17 of 63 OFFLINE   John Watson

John Watson

    Screenwriter

  • 1,937 posts
  • Join Date: Jul 14 2002

Posted July 12 2003 - 10:45 PM

Yes Brad, I had that bass-akwards, SCARLET LETTER, but Demi is the culprit.

Of her other work, having seen only GI Jane and Striptease, the question should any Demi film be remade, thats a whole other thread. Posted Image

#18 of 63 OFFLINE   Hendrik

Hendrik

    Supporting Actor

  • 596 posts
  • Join Date: Oct 23 1998

Posted July 12 2003 - 11:28 PM

...Spider Man... (or is it Spiderman ?)

. . . Posted Image . . .

#19 of 63 OFFLINE   MatthewA

MatthewA

    Producer

  • 6,225 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 19 2000
  • Real Name:Matthew
  • LocationSalinas, CA

Posted July 13 2003 - 07:20 AM

Eric, "Lost Horizon" has been remade as a musical so bad it destroyed several careers.

Enough is enough, Disney. No more evasions or excuses. We DEMAND the release Song of the South on Blu-ray along with the uncut version of Bedknobs and Broomsticks on Blu-ray. I will not support anything your company produces until then.


#20 of 63 OFFLINE   Rex Bachmann

Rex Bachmann

    Screenwriter

  • 1,975 posts
  • Join Date: Nov 10 2001
  • Real Name:Rex Bachmann

Posted July 13 2003 - 07:43 AM

Eric Peterson wrote (post #1):

Quote:
Like it or not, the studios are going to continue to do this, because they believe there is a built-in audience and money.

Sad, but so true.

Quote:
Are there any movies that you've seen that you wish somebody would remake[?]

My candidate for a remake is Roger Corman's X, The Man with the X-Ray Eyes (AIP, 1963).

This film presents a great idea that could be expanded upon and made truly alive on screen with today's advances in astronomic, physical, and biological knowledge, and, of course, through the extensive technical advances in film special effects.

The basic premise is that of a man gaining visual access to parts of the universe that are normally "out of sight" of human vision and, therefore, that fall outside of the range of human ken. Since we'll never know everything, the original film has a timelessly and universally valid theme, and is readily "remakable", in my opinion. It wouldn't matter whether the premise of the story were retained to keep the protagonist's new view within the invisible infrared, or altered to send it in the direction of the invisible ultraviolet, end of the spectrum. The idea that such a power would get out of one's control and drive one into cognitive areas that no human mind could even begin to be prepared to go is, for me at least, a thrilling and exciting prospect. If tied in with today's space-probing and -imaging satellite technology (Hubble, Chandra, COBE), all the better.


Quote:
. . . I do believe that there are valid reasons for remaking a film.

* Great Idea, Poorly Executed (i.e. Not a good movie the first time)
* Limitations due to Censorship
* Limitations due to technology
* Drastic differences from the source material (i.e. Book or Play)

This would come mostly under the third entry on your list. But also, with regard to the first point: The original movie can't fairly be said to have been "poorly executed", given its budgetary and other circumstances. It saw clearly the implications of its premise, but, in a popular-movie market, couldn't (partially due to technology limitations) and wouldn't take its premises to anything like an ultimate conclusion (due to the restrictions on "religious-philosophical-existential" explorations). Some of those hurdles still exist, but, I think, are more superable in today's fractured movie-making market.

The perfect director to render a remorseless, no-nonsense, "take-no-prisoners" delivery of such a vision: David Cronenberg.
"Delenda est . . . . "

 



Back to Movies (Theatrical)



Forum Nav Content I Follow