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life span of an rptv


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12 replies to this topic

#1 of 13 OFFLINE   JohnPhi

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Posted May 25 2003 - 05:12 AM

I just bought a Hitachi 51f500 and am wondering what the lifespan in on one of these sets? I am asking in general terms. The sales guy said they last as long as a tube television, but I wanted to know for sure

#2 of 13 OFFLINE   Jack Briggs

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Posted May 25 2003 - 07:52 AM

Rule of thumb: A salesperson will tell you what he or she thinks you want to hear. Generally, RPTVs are not as rugged as their direct-view counterparts. But if you calibrate it correctly and run the unit for reasonable stretches at a time, it should last a long enough time.

#3 of 13 OFFLINE   EarleD

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Posted May 25 2003 - 08:38 AM

John, i just bought the same set. How do you like it. Im thrilled with the picture quality. DVD's have never looked so good. Have you calibrated it yet. I ran VE and found that even with just a quick calibration, the picture quality is awesome. I hope to have it ISF'd in about 3-4 months. Earle

#4 of 13 OFFLINE   JohnPhi

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Posted May 25 2003 - 03:23 PM

Just out of curiousity, after you calibrated it, what did your contrast and brightness come out being? I am planning on calibrating it soon, but I haven't gotten the disk yet, so I am interested at what you have those set at. I do love the picture!!!!! DVD's look great After looking at color temp, I almost prefer it hot, not sure though

#5 of 13 OFFLINE   Kevin. W

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Posted May 25 2003 - 03:32 PM

[quote] Just out of curiousity, after you calibrated it, what did your contrast and brightness come out being? I am planning on calibrating it soon, but I haven't gotten the disk yet, so I am interested at what you have those set at.
[quote]

Until you calibrate turn down the contrast till at least have of max. Then use the brightness to increase if to dark. COntrast/Picture is the setting that can lead to burn-in issues.

Kevin

#6 of 13 OFFLINE   EarleD

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Posted May 25 2003 - 11:43 PM

John I use the standard color setting, and use movie mode for both Directv and DVD. I have SVM shut off. My contrast-33 brightness-53 color-31 sharpness-31 The picture seems slightly red sometimes so I have been lowering the color slightly. VE told me that the color setting should be 34, but 31 looks better to me. After I get Gregg Lowen to calibrate my set, im sure the picture will be even better. Good luck with your 51F500, keep us posted. Earle

#7 of 13 OFFLINE   Fredster

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Posted May 26 2003 - 12:24 AM

We've had a Pioneer (SD-P453P??) 45" going on 14 years now. One major repair (power supply). The picture still looks great. Longing for HD, but will probably wait until this one croaks.

#8 of 13 OFFLINE   Patrick Sun

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Posted May 26 2003 - 02:39 AM

EarleD, that brightness level seems high, as in Torch Mode high.
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#9 of 13 OFFLINE   EarleD

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Posted May 26 2003 - 04:30 AM

Patrick, I was concerned about that, but that is the number that VE worked out to be. I just knocked it down to 40. Ill run another VE calibraion later today. Earle

#10 of 13 OFFLINE   JohnPhi

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Posted May 26 2003 - 07:22 AM

well, 53 may sound high, but on the hitachi, that is out of 100,not 60 as in some sets. I finally set my color temp to medium, standard just looks ugly

#11 of 13 OFFLINE   JohnPhi

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Posted May 26 2003 - 08:32 AM

I also read that as long as those two settings, contrast and brightness were under fifty percent of total then it was ok.

#12 of 13 OFFLINE   Kevin P

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Posted May 26 2003 - 09:46 AM

Brightness set high isn't a problem; on a lot of sets the optimum brightness setting is around 50-60%. It's Contrast that needs to be kept down in the 30-40% range. Brightness actually sets black level; contrast sets white level. Set brightness too low and you'll lose shadow detail; set it too high and your blacks will be gray.

#13 of 13 OFFLINE   JohnPhi

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Posted May 26 2003 - 10:19 AM

I too have heard brightness is not the big culprit to burn in or short life span. The other night when watching star wars episode II or x men, I can't remember, I ran the thx optimizer and it said my brightness should be almost sixty percent. Until t hat high, I could not read the thx logo in the brightness test




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