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Is there an affordable way to catch up on X-Files seaons 1-7? (w/REPRICING INFO)


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#41 of 87 Haden

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:35 AM

It's no different than a printing of a book. The book sells once from the retailer, the company profits, and that's the end of it. It's "off the official market" now and can only be resold in used bookstores by private retailers without the company getting another cent from that particular printing. That seems perfectly fair to me and a lot of other people.

If the company wants to cash in on the same content again for another sale to the same person, they'll just have to reprint the book. Studios can just re-release the DVD with an incentive for the customer to buy again. They are never going to have claim to used sales profits, because that's double-dipping. They no longer own that tangible item. The person who bought it owns it and deserves 100% of whatever it resells for, regardless of who owns the copyrighted material inside that media.

#42 of 87 ChrisChap

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:35 AM

James - If you all you are buying when you buy a DVD is a license to view it, then the license is transferable unless it is made exclusive. As far as I know, there is no viable legal theory under which a license can be exclusive and non-transferable without your express written agreement. Therefore, you should be able to legally give, transfer, trade, or sell the disc (i.e. the license) to another person as you wish.

I seem to recall that the music industry attempted to fight this battle when used CD stores became more common and got nowhere.

#43 of 87 Haden

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:47 AM

Imagine this... if studios DID have claim to some of the profits when a DVD is resold, then that would greatly increase the number of times the same movie is re-released with some new extra or other incentive to make people want to buy it again. And then that would encourage the person to resell their previous version of the DVD to someone else. What a nightmare that would be, getting a rehashed version of the same movie on DVD once a year or more frequently!

#44 of 87 Malcolm R

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:47 AM

Person A - pays $100 for DVD set. Company gets a percentage of $100.

Person B - pays $100 for a DVD set. Company gets a percentage of $100. Person later sells set to friend.

Notice that the company profited the same under both circumstances.

But the friend of Person B is potentially a lost sale to the studio. In this scenario, they had three potential sales, but only made two even through three different owners possessed the product.
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#45 of 87 Haden

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:49 AM

Quote:
But the friend of Person B is potentially a lost sale to the studio. In this scenario, they had three potential sales, but only made two even through three different owners possessed the product.


They would have been a lost sale anyway if they weren't willing to pay full price for a new version. So it's the company's fault for not making the DVD desirable enough for EVERYONE to pay full price for from the stores. That's why some people pass on initially buying lackluster DVD releases with poor transfers or few extras and then pick them up later on on Ebay or local shops for a used price.

#46 of 87 Chet_F

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Posted May 22 2003 - 07:05 AM

"got X-Files 3-6 there at (gasp) $25/set... boxes a little scuffed, discs perfect.. "

YOU RULE!! I thought I was specail getting Season 6 for $50 and Season 5 for $60. But like a few other's have stated, I too have flipped the Hundo for a set here and there. I've probably spent about $70-75 on average for the 6 sets. Definately an expensive hobby to say the least but remember......the truth is out there.............
"If you’re lucky, people like something you do early and something you do just before you drop dead. That’s as many pats on the back as you should expect." - Warren Zevon 1993, R.I.P.

#47 of 87 James Reader

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Posted May 22 2003 - 07:16 AM

Quote:
if studios DID have claim to some of the profits when a DVD is resold, then that would greatly increase the number of times the same movie is re-released with some new extra or other incentive to make people want to buy it again.

or maybe they're already releasing "upgrades" to encourage potential second-hand customers to buy a "new" disc for a few dollars more?

This is going to be my final post of the subject, I can see my views aren't popular. (Pauses to hear muffled sounds of applause from the rest of the board).

While it may or not be unchallenged - second-hand sales do harm the revenue stream of a studio.

Recently there has been much anger at Disney's decision to release degradable DVDs - but as far as I know nobody has questioned why Disney would want to do so in the first place - the standard "Di$ney" and "Greed" jibes have come up a number of times, but nobody has really thought about why such a scheme would be tried.

How much are they projected to sell at? $6 or $7 if I remember correctly (and too much too). Now, take out the production costs, inventory control, warehousing, distribution, retailer costs etc and how much of that $6 or $7 are going to be going to Disney? Not much. How many copies of that one film will they have to "re-sell" to the same customer to equal the income they made through a normal DVD sale? 3 perhaps?

So that means that somebody would have to "buy/rent/whatever you want to call it" the same film 4 times in the degradable format for Disney to make more money than selling one of their normal DVDs. People who don't tend to buy DVDs rent or buy second hand anyway, so they're not an issue (according to the logic on this thread).

Now how many people are going to actually seek out and pay for the same film 4 times? How many films are people willing to pay for 4 times? Let's face it at least half of all films are average or worse by definition and I've got hundreds of DVDs, but there's only a few I've actually watched 4 or more times. While I'll admit the fact that Disney have so many animated classics with guaranteed repeat viewings is worrying, even those won't see Disney make an overall profit on the scheme (and for now, the animated classics aren't even included in the scheme). They'd be better off sticking to the current business model, or perhaps pushing rentals more. But at the same time I'm sure Disney is aware that the second-hand market for DVDs is increasing exponentially as DVD becomes more and more mainstream.

So by that logic, Disney are actually going to be loosing money on the scheme. Unless... could it be Disney wants to find a way to stop the ever increasing second hand market. I have friends who quite regularly buy a DVD, watch it then sell it on - it's part of how they justify their purchases. How can that benefit anyone apart from my friend and who he sells the disc too. It certainly doesn't benefit Disney - and this is what the degradable DVD is designed to stop. They certainly don't want to force you to pay every time you want to watch a film as most people have assumed, because on most of their films, they're going to be loosing money from the average customer for an average film.
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#48 of 87 Nick Graham

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Posted May 22 2003 - 07:40 AM

Technically the licence is non-transferrable (to paraphrase what's in most small print on cases "any unauthorised exchanging or reselling is forbidden").



Good grief, that's some significantly scary stuff....

#49 of 87 Randall Dorr

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Posted May 22 2003 - 07:40 AM

Disney's official line on degradable discs is that they are meant to replace rentals, not sell through discs. Clearly they feel degradable discs will be more profitable than the current rental scheme. There is absolutely no way in the world Disney (or any other company) would push degradable discs (or any other new product) if the end result was less profit than they make now.

And I think you're over estimating the success of the second hand market. Sure, there are some people who will buy a cheaper used disc in lieu of a more expensive new one. But I think the majority of second had buyers (like me) are looking to get a disc that they never would have paid full price for.

If I buy the X-Files used, there's no loss to the studio because I'm not willing to pay what they're charging.
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#50 of 87 Chet_F

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Posted May 22 2003 - 08:06 AM

James:

The degradable DVD market will fail miserably. Hey James...ever heard of DIVX supported by Circuit City. Is it still around??? No. Plain and simple. The DVD degradable market for Disney will fail miserably IF, and let me emphasize IF, it ever makes it off the ground. They are testing the waters right now and I can bet to guess they will soon discover that NO ONE wants their content controlled. It hasn't worked for the publishing companies, i.e. Acrobat Reader with "locked" e-books. It hasn't worked with CD's. It hasn't worked with DVD, i.e. Circuit City DIVX. The genie is out of the bottle and cannot and will not be put back in. It is impossible. The RIAA or MPAA would be shooting themselves in the foot if they try to control the content and they know it. In fact...I would bet thousands that if they tried to lock the content(Video on Demand, Degradble discs) and not sell a regular DVD or CD they would soon find out that the bootlegging community would THRIVE!!! I mean who would want a degradable disc when they can buy one that is a regular DVD from ebay. They need to learn that people not only like the ability to time shift, media shift, etc but they REQUIRE IT!! They want to download their CD to their drive or portable HD. They want to watch a movie whenever they want or where ever they want.

And they only reason Disney is looking into degradable discs is for one simple reason...the bottom line $$$.

I buy most of my CDs, DVDs, Books, etc used. It is cheaper and I do not care for the RIAA or the MPAA one bit so why should I give any $$ to their cause.

Do you work for them James?
"If you’re lucky, people like something you do early and something you do just before you drop dead. That’s as many pats on the back as you should expect." - Warren Zevon 1993, R.I.P.

#51 of 87 James Reader

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Posted May 22 2003 - 08:06 AM

I never said it would work. I was just explaining WHY they might want to do such a thing in the first place.
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#52 of 87 PaulP

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Posted May 22 2003 - 08:38 AM

I bought all seven seasons so far as they came out and paid around $80-90 for each. I think they were all worth it, as will be the case with the remaining two. This is one of the best shows ever.

#53 of 87 John C

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Posted May 22 2003 - 10:20 AM

Here's my take on what is really hurting the video game and music industries.......charging too damned much money for a technically inferior product!
I'm not a huge video game player so I balk at the at least $50 price tag charged on new video games. Does a computer or PS2 game cost more to make than a Hollywood film? I think not.....
The recording industry has whined incessantly about MP3 bootlegging destroying the industry. I'll tell you what's ruining the industry, $18 for a CD!!
If I go to Best Buy I can either buy the DVD of a film for around $15 (typically give or take a few bucks) and buy the movie soundtrack on CD for around $13. Which am I going to buy for that price point? The recording industry better start LOWERING prices if they want to increase sales. I know, I know, the execs never want to trade a short term loss for a long term gain....
Is anything I'm saying making any sense or are there still people out there boo-hooing for the video game and music industry?

#54 of 87 Thomas Newton

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Posted May 22 2003 - 10:27 AM

Quote:
I can see my views aren't popular.

We have this funny concept known as personal property here in the States. That might have something to do with it.

Quote:
While it may or not be unchallenged - second-hand sales do harm the revenue stream of a studio.

So what? The existence of a market for used cars may harm the revenue stream of a car maker. In a free market society, there is NO right to profit, only a right to TRY to make a profit in a legal way.

#55 of 87 Jason_H

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Posted May 22 2003 - 10:39 AM

In my opinion, second-hand sales fit straight into Economics 101: Supply and Demand. These used sales fill a niche for customers who would not pay the retail price for the product (and such, do not really represent a lost sale of a brand new unit). The reduced price represents a lot of things: sacrifice of convenience (having to check a bunch of places to find it perhaps instead of walking into Best Buy), condition of the product (and perhaps longevity), risk of defects (no warranty here unless provided by the place that sold it to you), etc.

There will always be those who want the game/DVD right when it comes out, some who will wait until the retail price drops, or some who will only buy it when it is dirt cheap. You could also argue that many of these second-hand business also sell new games/DVDs and act as another important outlet for the studios. People get drawn in by the used selection, and wind up buying a couple of new DVDs or games too (I know it's happened to me!).

#56 of 87 Michael Reuben

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Posted May 22 2003 - 10:48 AM

Quote:
We have this funny concept known as personal property here in the States.
And like so many things in the States, it's an import. Came over from England, as I recall.

M.
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#57 of 87 Dave F

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Posted May 22 2003 - 11:00 AM

Garth Brooks and the RIAA agree that sales of used CD's should be illegal. That alone is enough to convince me that sales of used CD/DVD's should be encouraged.

-Dave
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#58 of 87 Jon_Are

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Posted May 22 2003 - 12:24 PM

Back to the topic at hand, here's my suggestion:

Pick up Season One and Season Two from ebay.

When you're finished viewing Season One, put it up for auction on ebay. Once this transaction is complete, seek out a Season Three set on ebay and purchase it. In the meantime, enjoy Season Two.

Et cetera, et cetera.

This is assuming, of course, that you need not own the discs, just view them.

I'll shut up now and let you all return to the discussion that has nothing at all to do with the thread starter's original question.

Jon

#59 of 87 Nick Graham

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Posted May 22 2003 - 12:55 PM

I already am gonna jump on Netflix, which was a great suggestion my dumb butt had never thought of, so my problem is solved. Debate on!

Garth Brooks and the RIAA think used CDs should be illegal....yet they want $18-20 for 30 minutes of music.
Thanks goodness the studios don't have that kind of power here in the States...not for lack of trying.

#60 of 87 Robert_Z

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Posted May 30 2003 - 05:09 AM

I agree with the earlier pawn shop suggestion. I have bought many DVDs that way. As for X-files, I bought my seasons 1-6 online at eBay. 4 seasons used and 2 brand new. I spent less than $400 total, and they are all the real deal. None of that overseas stuff. Snoop around and find some good deals.


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