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Is there an affordable way to catch up on X-Files seaons 1-7? (w/REPRICING INFO)


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#21 of 87 Tommy Ceez

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Posted May 22 2003 - 01:01 AM

$20 a month to Netflix and I'm watching the entire run of X-Files, Sopranos, Traffik, I Claudius, plus tons of movies I would never buy.

Plus theres nothing better than getting the red envelope in the mail!
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#22 of 87 Greg S

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Posted May 22 2003 - 02:04 AM

Keep a check on the Software FS/FT forum here as there is almost ALWAYS someone selling X-files sets there. They are typically around $60 or so.

Greg

#23 of 87 Nick Graham

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Posted May 22 2003 - 03:29 AM

I had never even thought of Netflix...that's a good idea!

#24 of 87 Mark Zimmer

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Posted May 22 2003 - 03:32 AM

Another source is following half.com for sellers that state that it's a Region 1 US issue--I picked up seasons 5 and 6 for about $53 apiece for new sealed sets and wasn't ripped off. Check the feedbacks, though. These came from pawnshops, so there are some bargains floating around. You might not get them in order, but you can acquire the set for less than 50% of the retail without too much difficulty.

Next Generation is a little tougher to crack; I think Paramount's rapid release schedule made it difficult for people to buy up big stocks of them, but I've gotten a couple seasons very cheap on half.com too, and all non-bootlegs by being careful.

#25 of 87 Rick P

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Posted May 22 2003 - 04:21 AM

Don't forget your neighborhood pawn shops...

got X-Files 3-6 there at (gasp) $25/set... boxes a little scuffed, discs perfect..

#26 of 87 James Reader

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Posted May 22 2003 - 04:28 AM

I understand why Bootlegs are a forbidden topic on this forum, but isn't recommending second hand purchases just as bad?

After all, either way, the studio and creators will get no revenue from the sale.
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#27 of 87 Haden

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Posted May 22 2003 - 05:01 AM

Uh... the studio already got revenue from the initial sale of the product. Are you saying it should get a percentage each time that product is resold (like on Ebay, pawn shops, etc.)? That's dumb.

#28 of 87 Nick Graham

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Posted May 22 2003 - 05:09 AM

James, you've never bought anything used?

#29 of 87 James Reader

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Posted May 22 2003 - 05:12 AM

Quote:
Uh... the studio already got revenue from the initial sale of the product. Are you saying it should get a percentage each time that product is resold (like on Ebay, pawn shops, etc.)? That's dumb.

Well, it's not dumb - looking at the back of a Buena Vista DVD one of the conditions of sales is it cannot be "distributed". Isn't re-selling a form of "distribution". Technically the original terms of sale are being broken.

Second hand sales of console games are slowly killing the software industry - each year more and more games are released which fail to make any profit, while second hand sales boom. Who profits from second hand sales? Shops like EB, not the publishers who see nothing but reduced revenue. Mark my words, soon the repercussions of these actions will be felt by the games playing public. And I'm worried that given the durability of DVDs, the same could happen to the DVD market (but to a lesser extent).

It's no different to a person selling a personal bootleg -again, the studio got the revenue from the original sale. As I understand it, even personal back-up copies made for one's own use are not allowed to be discussed here. (I'm in no way equating a second-hand sales to a professional pirating operation, but the principle still stands).

Let's take the MTM sets as an example - the studio already got revenue and sales satistics from 1 sale. How does that help them or anyone else if the same disc is resold 3-5 times in it's lifetime. Result future sets are unlikely to be released.
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#30 of 87 Chris Lockwood

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Posted May 22 2003 - 05:33 AM

> looking at the back of a Buena Vista DVD one of the conditions of sales is it cannot be "distributed". Isn't re-selling a form of "distribution".

I don't see how a studio could legally prevent you from selling a legally acquired DVD. Are you saying that if I have a DVD I decide I no longer want, I should just throw it away?

If you don't see the difference between that & bootlegging, I don't know what to say. I guess we should only buy new cars as well.

There are used bookstores everywhere- that's really killed the publishing industry, hasn't it?

#31 of 87 Haden

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Posted May 22 2003 - 05:43 AM

Under that line of thinking, what do I do with my old car when I plan to buy a new one? Just destroy it rather than selling or trading it in? Does the car manufacturer deserve a percentage of that $1000 I got from selling it some some other guy?

I second the question posed to James above.... have you never bought any USED products? Never shopped at a garage sale or flea market? Never bought anything on Ebay?

I'm surprised someone is actually questioning whether or not we should purchase previously owned DVDs. The studio got their money when it was first sold, and that's all they deserve. They shouldn't have any claim to infinite resell value.

#32 of 87 Malcolm R

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Posted May 22 2003 - 05:55 AM

I see your point, James, but assume there's a distinction somewhere since second-hand sales thrive in any number of chain stores and private shops.

I think it must have something to do with it being a legal copy that's being "recycled" vs. introducing additional bootlegged copies into the marketplace.

In the first case, the quantity of legit copies (for which the studio has been paid) remains the same, they just change owners. In the second, additional copies are being made available for sale for which the studio hasn't been paid at all.
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#33 of 87 James Reader

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:04 AM

Quote:
don't see how a studio could legally prevent you from selling a legally acquired DVD. Are you saying that if I have a DVD I decide I no longer want, I should just throw it away?


Well, in the UK, you don't actually buy the "film" as such, just a personal licence to view the film (along with some shiny plastic and paper). Technically the licence is non-transferrable (to paraphrase what's in most small print on cases "any unauthorised exchanging or reselling is forbidden"). In fact this license is pivotal in the famous Warner Bros/Blockbuster case (and being picked up by Fox as well. Notice all those discs in the UK now specifically stamped "Not for Rental").

If once you own the DVD, the film yours to do with as you wish, why does the law stop you from projecting it onto a big screen and charging for entry? All DVDs, including American ones, state it is licenced for "home use only" and "public performance" is unauthorised.

Quote:
If you don't see the difference between that & bootlegging, I don't know what to say. I guess we should only buy new cars as well.


I obviously see the difference between mass produced bootlegs.

When it comes to giving or selling a giving a quick VCD copy to a friend, or selling a copy to a friend what's the major difference? Either way the studio has it's single copy revenue and either way you could argue it's not loosing a sale as the friend would never have bought the DVD for full price in the first place, and either way you are profiting. Either way the studio does not benefit from their intellectual property being "distributed". The only difference I can see is that if you sell the original copy on, you are physically unable to view or copy the DVD in the future. So why frown so much on one, but support the other wholeheartedly?

I'm in no way for any form of bootlegging (I've even gone to the expense of ordering a copy of Disney's Jungle Book from Japan because I know it would be an original copy, where as 10-1 odds are any copy I got from EBAY would be a bootleg, no matter how professional it looked).

Quote:
If you don't see the difference between that & bootlegging, I don't know what to say. I guess we should only buy new cars as well.

Being pedantic here, but that's not a good example - the car manufacturer's still benefit from second-hand sales due to maintenance costs and spare part sales. Posted Image However, there is no additional revenue stream once a studio sells a film to a customer.

Quote:
There are used bookstores everywhere- that's really killed the publishing industry, hasn't it?

I'm also not against second-hands sales as such and it would be impossible to "ban" them. However, second hand sales do have an effect of content producers. Didn't some book publishers association try to ban Amazon.com from selling second hand books for this very reason at one point though? (They failed to do so, of course)

Going back to console games and EB second hand sales, I'll be surprised if come 2007 there are more than 25% of current software publishers still surviving. This is down to a number of reasons, but reduced revenue due to ever increasing second hands sales is one of them. When a shop like EB makes so much profit from reselling used goods, is it really too much to ask that a percentage of the profit goes back to the original publishers and intellectual property holders?

While you may not agree with what I have typed, I hope it gives you something to think about - especially next time you curse about a studio releasing an unnecessary upgrade, or Disney wanting to release degradable DVDs or Universal wanting to push Video On Demand. There's a reason the studios want to move over to this sort of business model, and it's not all because of greed for the sake of greed.
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#34 of 87 Haden

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:07 AM

Here's how I see it:

The initial purchase of the product from the manufacturer/retailer is paying for the ownership of its contents. Any additional reselling of that product in the used market is simply a transfer of ownership. The studio should not be paid more than once for the same product. It's a one-time sale, and their revenue relies on a large volume of one-time sales. If they suddenly had a legal claim to inifinite resell value of the SAME product, that would screw over the entire consumer market and only increase piracy/bootlegging to avoid paying the retailer again for something you've already bought.

#35 of 87 James Reader

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:11 AM

Quote:
I'm surprised someone is actually questioning whether or not we should purchase previously owned DVDs


I'm not questioning that. I'm questioning if the practice should be promoted on this forum.
"Would you recommend this movie to a friend?"
"Only if I was friendly with Hitler."

#36 of 87 Christopher_S

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:13 AM

Nick-

Have you checked your public library? I don't know how ours compares to others around the country, but I can borrow almost any title I want, including series sets like the X-Files, as long as I'm willing to wait my turn... the lists tend to be on the long side, as one might imagine.

For me, the library has completely replaced rental places, and drastically cut down on the money I spend buying titles sight unseen.
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#37 of 87 Haden

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:19 AM

Quote:
I'm not questioning that. I'm questioning if the practice should be promoted on this forum.


I see nothing wrong with recommending that someone buy a used product if they can't afford and/or don't desire a brand new mint condition version. It's not cheating the company out of any money, for the reasons below:

Person A - pays $100 for DVD set. Company gets a percentage of $100.

Person B - pays $100 for a DVD set. Company gets a percentage of $100. Person later sells set to friend.

Notice that the company profited the same under both circumstances. So who cares if the DVD is resold to a different person later on? I'm sure the studio doesn't. They got their money for that DVD set just the same as if that person bought it and kept it FOREVER. Their only concern now is thinking of a new way to repackage the same content (with new extras, better transfer, etc) and sell it again for another one-time sale.

After the initial purchase, the only thing anyone is really paying for during a resell is a transfer of ownership rights. The CONTENT was already paid for the first time and should never be paid for again unless officially re-released in a new form.

#38 of 87 Kevin M

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:21 AM

Indeed, Netflix is how I am catching up on whole seasons of shows that I originally had little interest or time to invest in, shows like Star Trek: The Next Generation - Deep Space Nine - Friends - Ab Fab or shows that I used to love but..
#1 do not have the cash for and..
#2 haven't seen in YEARS such as Space 1999 - Outer Limits - M.A.S.H. etc. etc.

I say try Netflix.
-Kevin M.

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#39 of 87 James Reader

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:24 AM

Quote:
Notice that the company profited the same under both circumstances. So who cares if the DVD is resold to a different person later on? I'm sure the studio doesn't.


The studio does. BY that reasoning the studio can get 1 income while the same disc can exchange hands with hundreds of people over it's lifetime and the studio won't see another cent. Why do you think Disney want to release degradable DVDs? It's not so much as they want to charge us for every viewing - they want to stop people buying a title, watching it and then selling it on.
"Would you recommend this movie to a friend?"
"Only if I was friendly with Hitler."

#40 of 87 Michael Reuben

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Posted May 22 2003 - 06:28 AM

Quote:
I'm questioning if the practice should be promoted on this forum.

There is no prohibition on such discussion. The sale of discs in the used market does not implicate the same concerns as copying the content.

M.
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