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Questions about RPTV, HDTV, and XBOX


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#1 of 10 LowellG

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Posted May 14 2003 - 09:53 PM

Hello,
I am currently thinking about buying a RP HDTV. I own a 32” Sony Trinitron that’s about 5-years old so I am thinking of upgrading. I don’t even know what formats it supports. The model I am currently looking at upgrading to is the Toshiba 42H82. However, after reading all the forums on RPTVs, it looks like these things are very high maintenance. Not just this Toshiba model, but all RPTVs. Is this true? Will I be happy owning an RPTV after having a tube TV for so long?

I have a couple of other questions. What should I be looking for in a DVD player? I don’t own a progressive scan one and obviously to take advantage of the HDTV I will need one.

Also, for Xbox owners, how do you find out if a game supports 480P, 720P, or 16x9? I know there is a section in the software forum that has a games list, but where would I find out that from the manufacturer? They don’t seem to list that in the games features. What exactly does the Xbox support anyhow?

Thanks for your advice. Lowell G.

#2 of 10 Jeff Gatie

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Posted May 15 2003 - 01:21 AM

After initial calibration and convergence and then a fine tune after 100 hours or so, you should have no more maintenance for a RPTV than a direct view. Sure you may check for convergence drift or shift in calibration, but you would check for calibration differences on your direct view also. You do have to be more concerned with burn-in issues and some recommend not playing any video games on your RPTV, but that is a risk only you can decide. Also, you have to allow for more light control with a RPTV, cause light output is not as good as you average direct view. This however is a plus as far as I'm concerned because ambient light management is what gives that "theater" feel to a HT.

A progressive player is not necessary for a HDTV, but I found the benefits to be substantial on my Tosh 56H80. YMMV.


Can't answer you XBox question, I don't play TV based games.

#3 of 10 Stephen_Ri

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Posted May 15 2003 - 03:54 AM

The Xbox supports 480p on 99% of its games, 720p on several(more every day), and 1080i on one(Dragon's Lair). Go here for a list of HD games http://hdgames.net/

Stephen

#4 of 10 LowellG

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Posted May 15 2003 - 04:24 AM

Thanks for the replies so far. How many years can I expect a RPTV to last? I am beginning to think it's a bad investment. Also is DLP worth the extra money? I was thinking of buying over the forth of July weekend, I am currently out of country. Would waiting an extra 6-months for 2004 make and difference? I know probably price wise, but how about technology and standards. Thanks again. Lowell

#5 of 10 Jeff Gatie

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Posted May 15 2003 - 04:45 AM

Without abuse, an RPTV should last 10 years or more. Why would you think it is a bad investment? I know there are threads discussing the dangers of game playing on RPTV's, but aside from this (and I think this is overblown if you do not abuse them, i.e. leave static images or keep it in torch mode), an RPTV is no more prone to failure than a direct view, IMHO.

#6 of 10 LowellG

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Posted May 15 2003 - 05:19 AM

I guess I was thinking they would only last about 4-5 years. I don't know what abuse is, but I would use it appx 50-60hrs per week of watching TV and mix within that, 5-10hrs of game playing. I also worry about what standards will be defined with the 2006 deadline for HDTV. If I buy the wrong model, that's a new TV in 3 years.

Thanks for alleviating my fears with the 10-year estimate.

#7 of 10 Jack Briggs

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Posted May 15 2003 - 05:34 AM

But a lifespan that long depends on you not abusing the set. Keep the contrast and brightness under strict control. I would even then advise against using an XBox with the thing. Even people who have had their RPTVs professionally calibrated are reporting instances of burn-in. Yet there are others who have experienced no problems whatsoever.

#8 of 10 Jeff Gatie

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Posted May 15 2003 - 06:35 AM

The standards for future HDTV would apply to a direct view as well as a RPTV, so the point is moot, especially considering a widescreen direct view is considerably more expensive per diagonal inch than a RPTV, and considerably smaller in maximum size. Jack is right about abuse, you must keep your contrast and brightness under strict control, but I would recommend that for direct view also, if you want the tube to last. The only caveat is gaming, which is a concern. But even given Jack's warning, I still think any burnin is mostly due to leaving static images on an overdriven screen for long periods of time. I have had my RPTV for 2 years, watch at least 10 hours of DVD's per week, a great number of them 2.35:1 or 4:3 (more than I view 1.85:1) and I have absolutely no hint of burnin due to black bars, which are as static as you can get. I also have my set configured using Avia, closely control ambient light so the urge to 'tweak' up the contrast is nil, and I vary my viewing habits.

That said, if you feel you cannot control the above variables in the manner necessary to eliminate the risk, maybe the benefits of an RPTV outweigh the advantages in your case.

#9 of 10 Frank_Ber

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Posted May 15 2003 - 11:50 AM

Watching 50-60hrs per week is WOW!

I just bought my first RPTV (46WT500) as well and I am a little concerned with burn-in. Just calibrate your set with S&V or AVIA and you should be fine for many years to come.

#10 of 10 LowellG

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Posted May 15 2003 - 03:46 PM

Thanks again for the advice. I think I may take the plunge when I get back in the US. I guess the maintenance thing is a new thing to me. I haven't touched my Trinitron in the past 5 years, and it seems to be fine. Maybe it's all out of whack and I don't even know it. :-)

As for the high usage. It would be on between my whole family 50-60 hrs, and I think that's a high estimate, but just in case. It's probably closer to 40-50 in a high week with 30-40 being the average over a year.