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Resilient channel on ceiling only?


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12 replies to this topic

#1 of 13 OFFLINE   Aaron Gould

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Posted April 01 2003 - 07:16 AM

I am building my home theater in the basement of my newly built home. Three sides are concrete, and the fourth side separates the room from the stairwell and the furnace area.

The walls are not even framed yet, so anything is possible.

I am considering resilient channel for the ceiling.

Would having resilient channel ONLY on the ceiling, and not on the walls defeat its purpose? Or will the sound simply travel up the wall frames, and around the ceiling to the first floor?

I can't really spend much money, and I do not need to prevent all sound from escaping. The floor immediately above (kitchen and dining room) is not a living space, so sound level is not a big issue there. Our "great room" and bedrooms on the second floor are the ones I would like silence in (or as much as possible).

Perhaps the "empty" first floor is enough of a buffer?

Or maybe adding insulation between the above floor joists would help? Maybe JUST having insulation would suffice?

#2 of 13 OFFLINE   Erik Farstad

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Posted April 01 2003 - 08:01 AM

Aaron, I used RC on the ceiling only, as well as using 3' wide rolls of aspalt/roofing material and it does a very good job of sound control. Much like you I wasn't too worried about sound, but I did want to provide some control. As long as you seal any gaps where air can escape into the wall cavities, you should be good to go. Where air travels so does sound. You can see pics by follow my link below...have fun and good luck!Posted Image

E

#3 of 13 OFFLINE   Aaron Gould

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Posted April 01 2003 - 01:23 PM

Thanks for the input!

I think I will stick with the plan of putting resilient channel on the ceiling only. I will grab some tubes of "Accoustic Sealant" too to fill in the gaps when the drywall is secured.

I'm not sure I'll go so far as to put roofing material though. Do you think sound dampening insulation (Fiberglass Pink QuietZone, or Roxul Safe N'Sound) would do a similar job if I were to pack it between the floor joists before attaching the resilient channel/drywall?

Also -- I visited both a Building Box and Home Depot today to check out resilient channel. They both had 12' pieces at exactly the same price. However, the Building Box's version was more rigid than Home Depot's (it was labeled RC-2). Should I go with the more rigid channel? To be honest the Home Depot stuff felt like I could bend it a few times and it would snap in half. I'm not sure what the RC level was on Home Depot's channel...

#4 of 13 OFFLINE   Tom Moran

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Posted April 01 2003 - 02:39 PM

I used RC-1 which is probably what you saw at Home Depot and I would guess that the RC-2 is just a newer, improved version. I can't imaging the improvement has much to do with sound control as stiffer would not mean better.

What I can guess is that the stiffer stuff would be easier to install. The only down side of the RC-1 was that it often got pushed back by the sheetrock screw rather than allowing the screw to go into the material and this made it kind of a pain to install. You have to screw into it near a joist so there is something to support it and then go back and get screws in the other places where you can get them to take.

I just put it on the ceiling and some insulation in the joists and used 5/8" sheetrock for both the ceiling and the walls. Moderate sound insulation without much hassle.

Tom

#5 of 13 OFFLINE   Chris Tsutsui

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Posted April 01 2003 - 10:08 PM

I dunno, Maybe you should consider wall resilient channels...

The bass might go through or under the drywall, and then bypass the resilient ceiling up through the framing. Even the smallest crack can end up transmitting the sound so you have to make sure it's air tight.

If you have concrete walls with a resilient ceiling, you'll probably have some really strong horizontal standing waves. If you frame the concrete walls and use some acoustic materials there as well, you'll probably end up helping the bass sound quailty.

However, if you don't care that much about having a linear bass response then I wouldn't bother with the acoustic treatments.


#6 of 13 OFFLINE   Aaron Gould

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Posted April 02 2003 - 02:27 AM

Well there's going to be some cracks anyway (like under the doors), but I'm going to try to seal it as much as possible. I'm not concerned about containing 100% of the sound.

What I'm really wanting to know is whether resilient channel on the ceiling, in tandem with sound-dampening insulation everywhere else, is better than just plain drywall attached to the framing, and no insulation. (Acoustic Sealant will be used to seal all gaps too, including spaces left all around the drywall).

The channel plus insulation will cost somwhere around $200-250 CDN. I'm really just wondering if what the proposed solution will be worth the roughly $250.

#7 of 13 OFFLINE   Erik Farstad

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Posted April 02 2003 - 02:39 AM

Aaron, Insulation between joists will also help dampen the sounds, but it is really the use of RC on the ceiling that will do the job...IMHO. Insulation does not hurt but only help...so if it's in your budget it doesn't hurt...especially that quiet zone stuff! Posted Image

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#8 of 13 OFFLINE   Aaron Gould

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Posted April 02 2003 - 04:25 AM

I will definitely be insulating the ceiling, and perhaps the wall separating the stairwell as they have nothing at all except wood framing. I may also add resilient channel to that stairwell wall too, but I'll sleep on that idea.

The three concrete wall sides already have a thin layer of insulation starting at approximately three feet up. They are outside walls so that insulation would be for temperature protection. I'll probably add some QuietZone around the top of those three walls in an effort to reduce sound from crawling up the sides...

#9 of 13 OFFLINE   NathanH

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Posted April 02 2003 - 05:24 AM

Question here:

I'm in a similar situation. I've got steel-studed walls that are attached to the floor joists above. I have a room seperated by a soffit down the middle of the ceiling, which will be used to divide the space into two areas.

One half of the ceiling where the HT will reside, I will finish in drywall and perhaps use RC.

The other half where a pool table will reside will have ceiling tile for practical purposes.

All ceilings will be insulated.

Is it worth doing the drywall half in RC?
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#10 of 13 OFFLINE   Tom Moran

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Posted April 02 2003 - 03:42 PM

Yes, the RC will make a difference in keeping bass vibrations from travelling up into the room above.

Tom

#11 of 13 OFFLINE   Bill Lucas

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Posted April 03 2003 - 12:49 AM

Not really. Bass (sound) doesn't know boundaries. Give it an adjacent area to escape through and it will travel through that area. Regards.

#12 of 13 OFFLINE   Quiet Zone

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Posted August 05 2007 - 10:34 AM

Quiet Zone Acoustic Insulation is awesome. I also used Quiet Zone to insulate my home theater. I used it in addition to Quiet Glue between two staggered thicknesses of 5/8" gypsum. Of course, none of this can go into place until every little crack is filled with foam and/or silicone! I have a ton of Quiet Zone Batts left over (enough for 3 home theatres- misordered and can't return). If you're in the market, let me know!Posted Image

#13 of 13 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted July 05 2012 - 12:44 AM

ARISE O SLUMBERING THREAD!


:)


I'll re-asking from my pre-wire thread, hoping for a quick response.

http://www.hometheat...30#post_3944719



Is it worth doing Sound channel in basement finished ceiling space for $655? The walls will be normal. This drops ceiling about 2", and gives some acoustic separation between basement and first floor. I've never experienced it, but I've heard about it. It seems like a good idea between the two main TV / movie / video game rooms. But if it's ineffectual with ceiling only, I don't want to waste money.