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Leaving Electronics(Receivers, Amps) On All Day


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22 replies to this topic

#1 of 23 James Edward

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Posted March 20 2003 - 02:49 PM

I have noticed that my receiver (NAD T752) sounds much better after being on for at least an hour. Currently, throughout the day I turn it on and off as I use it.

Is there any harm in just leaving it on all day? I believe I read somewhere that the 'shock' of turning electronics on and off is worse for them than just leaving them on throughout the day.

Anyone have a definitive answer to this? Thanks
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#2 of 23 Mat_M

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Posted March 20 2003 - 04:23 PM

I'd like to see this question answered too. I have a feeling that the answer will be device (and even brand) specific.

#3 of 23 DaveHo

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Posted March 21 2003 - 12:46 AM

My CD player, Pre-amp, Amp and Sub have been powered up for years. The only time they get powered off is when there is an electrical storm close by, and that's only if I'm home at the time. All of my gear is plugged into Panamax & Brickwall surge suppression, so I'm not too concerned about any power line nasties.

The system definately sounds better after it's been on for an hour or so. I'm a firm believer that thermal cycling and powering up/down are more harmful to electronics than anything else.

-Dave

#4 of 23 James Edward

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Posted March 21 2003 - 01:37 AM

Dave- Any issues with burn-in on the display? The NAD has a 'vacuum fluorescent' front panel, whatever that means...
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#5 of 23 Ron Duca

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Posted March 21 2003 - 03:12 AM

Related to this same subject...

I have an Anthem MCA 50 amp, which has an "Auto-On" mode. In this mode, the amp is basically in "standby" mode until it receives a line signal from my pre/pro and then switches off 20 minutes after the signal stops.

How "on" or warmed-up is my amp while in idle stage of this mode?
Ron

#6 of 23 Jack Briggs

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Posted March 21 2003 - 04:49 AM

If a piece of electronic gear requires more than a half hour or so of "warm-up" time to "sound" its best then it hasn't been designed properly.

It's kind of either/or. If you feel safe leaving the units powered up continuously, fine. But powering up once a day shouldn't shave that much, if any, life off a well-designed unit. (I would, however, advise turning the units off and on several times during a single day.)

#7 of 23 Mat_M

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Posted March 21 2003 - 05:03 AM

Quote:
(I would, however, advise turning the units off and on several times during a single day.)


Did you mean wouldn't?

#8 of 23 JimmyK

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Posted March 21 2003 - 05:11 AM

I have several components that I've had over 20years, including a preamp, power amps, EQ, and a sound processor that I've turned on and off as needed. I've never had a problem with any of these components and they still perform like new. However, I do try not to turn them on and off too many times throughout a single day.

I agree with Jack that turning them on once or so a day would have a minimal impact if any.

Something else to consider is potential heat buildup from leaving components on all the time. If they are well ventilated, then it shouldn't be a problem. If they are in an enclosed cabinet and/or on top of power amps, then I would think the buildup of heat would be more destuctive than turning them on and off.

My components have always been place in an open rack that allows plenty of air to flow around each component. Perhaps this has contributed to their longevity and reliability.

#9 of 23 Doug_H

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Posted March 21 2003 - 05:59 AM

The biggest reason for leaving them on in my opinion is the same as leaving on a computer. There are different lines of thinking but this makes sense to me.

When an electronic component is cold and then turned on the solder on the boards has to warm up with the current. This can cause the connections to become brittle over time and eventually lead to trouble. by leaving the component on you avoid this altogether.

I leave my gear on 24/7 for this reason alone.
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#10 of 23 James Edward

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Posted March 21 2003 - 06:22 AM

If a piece of electronic gear requires more than a half hour or so of "warm-up" time to "sound" its best then it hasn't been designed properly.


I don't know about that statement. I have a very heavy Adcom 2 channel power amp that seems to take at least an hour or two to sound its best. I've always attributed this to the sheer mass of the transformer and other parts just to heat up. The NAD receiver is also quite heavy, so perhaps there is a correlation.

The Adcom also has very large heat sinks that might be bleeding off some BTU potential.

If your statement is correct, there are an awful lot of poorly designed pieces of equipment out there.

I am going strictly from personal experience. To be honest, I don't know exactly what within electronics needs to be warm to sound better, just that it does.
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#11 of 23 Kevin Deacon

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Posted March 21 2003 - 07:31 AM

According to Jack all my equipment is poorly designed. I'm going back over to the Audio Asylum, geez...

#12 of 23 Ted Lee

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Posted March 21 2003 - 08:22 AM

i will usually turn my gear on once during the day, then leave it on until i go to bed.

i think any electronic component suffers if you turn it on and off too many times.
Quote:
When an electronic component is cold and then turned on the solder on the boards has to warm up with the current. This can cause the connections to become brittle over time...
i've heard this too.

i suspect older gear like jimmy's was more robustly built, therefore they can withstand that type of punishment. i am quite doubtful that any piece of gear built today can withstand the same torture test.
 

#13 of 23 DaveHo

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Posted March 24 2003 - 02:14 AM

Quote:
Dave- Any issues with burn-in on the display? The NAD has a 'vacuum fluorescent' front panel, whatever that means...

Neither my CD player or the Preamp have any sort of fancy display. So far the LCD's and LED's for the different buttons are just fine. Same goes for the power indicator on the amp.

-Dave

#14 of 23 Jonathan M

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Posted March 24 2003 - 08:26 AM

I don't leave my gear on all day for the sole reason that it's a waste of electricity. I am purchasing a NAD T752 today, and will leave it in standby when not in use, as it is more convenient, and uses little power while in this mode (And the VFL is off I believe).

If your amp takes a few hours for the "sound" to warm up then I agree with Jack - it's not designed well.

A typical class A/B amp should not take more than 10 seconds or so for it's bias current to stabilize, and if it's well designed, will be temperature compensated to prevent thermal runaway, so shouldn't matter how long it's been running. Tubes are ofcourse a little different as they are far more temperature dependent.

Perhaps it is YOU that is becoming warmed up to the sound? I know I appreciate the sound more after I have been listening for a while, as I "get into" the music. It's more a state of mind than an actual change in sound though IMO.

But hey, if it makes you feel better, leave it on - you pay the electrical bill.
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#15 of 23 Marty Neudel

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Posted March 25 2003 - 02:05 AM

>If your amp takes a few hours for the "sound" to warm up then I agree with Jack - it's not designed well.<

Somebody better tell Madrigal that their Mark Levinson equipment is not designed well.

#16 of 23 Tom Grooms

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Posted March 25 2003 - 02:24 AM

Ya, My Plinius 8200 MKII must be junk too. Anyone want to trade for a HK Receiver?

#17 of 23 Yousaf

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Posted March 25 2003 - 07:25 AM

Tom:

Yes. Posted Image

#18 of 23 Shane Martin

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Posted March 25 2003 - 08:22 AM

Keep in mind Jack is a known skeptic so take his statement with a huge grain of salt. Correct me if I'm wrong Jack Posted Image

That would explain ALOT about his statement alone. Much like having an equipment break in discussion and someone telling you that equipment break in is a joke and is not properly designed if it requires it Posted Image

#19 of 23 PaulDF

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Posted March 26 2003 - 04:33 PM

Is switching a unit into standby essentially like turning it off? Or does it still keep some circuits going?

Generally speaking, of course. With mid quality components.

#20 of 23 RobCar

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Posted March 26 2003 - 05:23 PM

I turn mine off for a few reasons:

1. When they're on all the time, they attract much more dust (I live in a dry climate). Just look at your tv after it's on for a few hours.

2. Save electricity.

3. I just don't buy the hour-to-warm-up thing.

I obsess about the dust. If I can see a certain amount on top of my receiver, can I assume that equal amounts are also falling through the cooling vents and getting into the internals? And if so, what do I do about that internal dust?





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