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Protective Screens? Advantages? Disadvantages?


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#1 of 13 OFFLINE   David Von Pein

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Posted January 30 2003 - 10:27 AM

Ron Epstein made a remark in a post once upon a time (in a galaxy far, far away) that he liked the "glossy" look of the protective screen on his RPTV, but he ended up taking it off nonetheless. I, like Ron, kinda like the glossy look as well. But what are the overall advantages/disadvantages to these "glare" screens on RPTVs? I've read that these shields are supposed to CUT the glare. But most HTF'ers seem to say they ADD MORE glare. Are they mainly to simply protect the actual TV screen? I'm dubious about taking mine off the TV. I really like the look of the TV when it's on there. Thanks.

#2 of 13 OFFLINE   Carlos Picart

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Posted January 30 2003 - 10:34 AM

Mine is extremely reflective.. that said, where the TV is placed in my home... reflections aren't really a huge problem for me. I could see how it could be in a different environment. So I keep mine on (altho I dont' really have an option with my Sony). Luckily my viewing angles and lighting environment don't produce a ton of glare. Plus I do get a tiny sense of satisfaction knowing it's a little bit safer with it on.

#3 of 13 OFFLINE   David Von Pein

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Posted January 30 2003 - 10:52 AM

Thanks, Carlos.

I'm positive I'll be keeping mine on...I just want to hear some additional advantages to doing so.

I found these June 2000 comments kind of intriguing.

Obviously, it wasn't until at least late 2000 that the TV makers put "built-in" glare shields on their sets.

Note how there are multiple comments on how the screens add to the actual picture quality! Anybody here find this to be the case? Or is the screen there strictly for protection?

#4 of 13 OFFLINE   Guy Usher

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Posted January 30 2003 - 12:44 PM

There is only one to buy, "Acrylite Non-Reflective Sheet" by "Cyro" I put one on my 48311 and threw away the glossy "color tuned" shield that came with the TV. I too thought I liked the glossy look but after about 3 months of the good life, and not seeing my wifes underwear in the TV screen I will never go back. I tried Acrylite P99 anti-Glare for awhile but was not satisfactory, so I cut it up and use it as intended to remove glare from photos. IMO there is no comparison with the new shield, I could spend over 300 bucks for the anti-glare diamond shield, cut it down and still not work as good as this Acrylite stuff. I paid about 40 bucks cut to size. Even used non-reflective glass for awhile, that works too but too easy to break and very heavy.
Even Monkeys fall from trees.

#5 of 13 OFFLINE   David Von Pein

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Posted January 30 2003 - 02:04 PM

Is this one any good at cutting back on glare? .......

High Contrast TheaterShield™ A/R.......
This built-in protective screen provides scratch resistance, improves contrast and reduces unwanted reflections by over 50% by adding an anti-reflective layer to both the front and the back of the shield.



#6 of 13 OFFLINE   Michael TLV

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Posted January 30 2003 - 03:26 PM

Greetings Protective screens were put in for both protection as well as for marketing purposes (which have nothing to do with protection.) The glare is there because it is supposed to be there. direct view tube sets have glare .... people are used to glare. Add a plexiglass to the RPTV and suddenly the RPTV has glare ... and it seems a lot closer to being a direct view. the average person looking for something bigger than 32" suddenly does not find RPTV's as alienatingly different. Regards
Michael @ The Laser Video Experience
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#7 of 13 OFFLINE   David Von Pein

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Posted January 30 2003 - 03:38 PM

I found the following info at another website. Any thoughts about this from HTF'ers? ...... >> "Gentlemen, I know many of you see glarescreen restacking as a benifit, but I must tell you it is to your disadvantage by placing the screen on the inside. To understand this, we have to go back to the basics of light physics. The purpose of removing the protective screen is to improve resolution, increase light output, and to get rid of the nasty reflections created when light hits the surface of the screen. When the reflective protector is placed on the inside of the set, what do you think is the first thing that hits it? LIGHT!!! By restacking your screen, you are creating gross internal reflections in the projection house that are completely unnecessary and unuseful in reproducing an optimal image. It's the 'law of reflection' of light that says no matter what angle light comes from, it will be reflected back at the same angle. Therefore the angle of incidence = the angle of reflection. Where is this light being reflected back to? The MIRROR of course! (That will help you understand why the mirror and the CRT's are angled the way they are to project an image on an upright flat screen). These unnecessary reflections are also being reflected back down to the lenses, which is the source of the image in the projection booth. While this is an inevitable situation in rear projection sets, it is further exaggerated by this glarescreen restacking procedure. Black level will suffer as well as shadow detail, and virtually all other aspects of the image, thus keeping it from its integrity. Another problem with restacking is the nature of the 'screen system' on a rear projection set. A fresnel-lenticular screen works together to display an image. As light from the mirror is transmitted to the fresnel, it passes through it by refraction to the lenticular so we can see the image properly. It's beyond the scope of this article to explain how this is done, but basically refraction is light bent to a different angle while passing through a surface. What you should know is that the 'screen system' is disrupted when placing the glare screen on the inside. Since the glare screen is a relatively transparent object, it too is subjected to the refraction (whether inside or outside the set). On the inside of the projection set, this will change the path of the travelling light from the mirror to the fresnel (thus tampering with the engineering designs of each piece and allowing them to perform inferiorly). The result is not in your favour because you've changed the intended path of light from the mirror to the fresnel, from the fresnel to the lenicualated screen, and from the screen to your eyes. The image will be slightly blurred whether the protector is on the front or the back. Lenticulated screens are also a problem in itself, but I won't discuss this at this time. I do hope that you get a basic understanding of why screen protectors take away from the integrity of the final image displayed, and why restacking is not the ideal option to getting rid of reflecting light. One can agree that it only amplifies the problem as well as creating a host of new problems."

#8 of 13 OFFLINE   Michael TLV

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Posted January 30 2003 - 03:44 PM

Greetings The advantage of restacking versus not removing it at all are clear. It far outweighs not doing it. One can use weather stripping as well and not restack, but that may create stability problems with the remaining two pieces of the screen. Anyone looked at a Fresnel Lens lately ... looks pretty reflective by itself ... Also possible to stack the plexiglass in the middle of the stack. Regards
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#9 of 13 OFFLINE   Guy Usher

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Posted January 30 2003 - 09:28 PM

I cannot speak to restacking the screens but I can say that replacing the "Glossy" screen protector or removing it all together does make for a much better picture
Seeing Is Believing - A Protective Sheet That Enhances Optics!


Continuously Manufactured Acrylic Sheet

New ACRYLITE® Anti-Reflective acrylic sheet, an ideal protective filter, improves the clarity and brilliance of optical displays with increased (97%) light transmission. It reduces unwanted glare and reflection that often interferes with the information display to # 2.0% total reflectance. Along with exceptional impact resistance, the sheet is also abrasion and chemical resistant for added durability of LCD screens, PTVs, flat panel displays, and dashboard readouts.

ACRYLITE Anti-Reflective sheet fabricates easily, making it particularly well suited for non-standard sized displays and glazing such
Anti-reflective sheet
Acrylite anti-reflective sheeting reduces unwanted glare and reflection from LCD screens, projection televisions, flat panel displays and instrumentation readouts. The material provides 97% light transmission and reduces glare and reflection to less than 2%, maximizing light transmission over the visible spectrum, even under difficult lighting conditions. Custom-cut sheets are available. CYRO Industries, Rockaway, NJ. www.rsleads.com/210df-142
A little information, I had the name wrong it is not "Non-Reflective Sheet" but it is "Anti-Reflective Sheet", it has been awhile since I did this, but it does work great.
Even Monkeys fall from trees.

#10 of 13 OFFLINE   David Von Pein

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Posted January 31 2003 - 11:56 AM

[quote] A Protective Sheet That Enhances Optics! [quote]
But isn't that EXACTLY what we should be getting from the screens that are already supplied with the RPTVs?

Toshiba seems to think so........

High Contrast TheaterShield™ A/R.......
This built-in protective screen provides scratch resistance, improves contrast and reduces unwanted reflections by over 50% by adding an anti-reflective layer to both the front and the back of the shield.


WHY should I risk damage by removing the standard screen, just to put on another that does the same thing? Posted Image

#11 of 13 OFFLINE   Matt Wallace

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Posted January 31 2003 - 01:56 PM

My newly walking child is keen on beeting my protective screen when he's not being closely watched, so -for me - it's already paid for itself. Until he's like 4, I won't be removing it and will just work a little harder to reduce glare (not TOO bad of a problem for this apartment). If I was having it ISF'd at a home, though, I'd get it removed. Matt
"And I say I'm dead, and I move"....

#12 of 13 OFFLINE   Guy Usher

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Posted February 01 2003 - 10:10 AM

Yes but the Acrylite reduces glare not by 50% but by 98% that is a big difference. On a Mits the diamond has a anti-glare for 340 bucks. . . I am talking 40 bucks for one that does better. When I bought mine I had no choice because I had windows on 3 sides, only at night could I watch TV now I have moved but the new screen is now not an option but a requirement, for me at least. Now that I have lived with about 6 different types I finally found the one that does what they say it will do. The piece of crap that came with the TV was there, I think, to make it look more like a real tube. . . When the TV is off it does look like a big dark hole there, small price to pay.Again it is what I like, you might not and thats fine too. BTW I wash it with windex, have been for 3 months now, doesnt touch it. . .
Even Monkeys fall from trees.

#13 of 13 OFFLINE   Ray Kerr

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Posted April 11 2003 - 11:13 AM

Well, I'm new to the HDTV thing and this thread is SOOO pertinent! I managed to snap a corner off of the "protective" screen on my Mitsu 48311... I too have a problem with glare. I'm in the process of doing what I can to cut down on the ambient light in the family room, but it will never be a full fledged theater. There's a plastic company here in town that has the Cyro anti relective plastic... They'll cut me a piece for about 20 bucks. THis is just as addictive as my motorcycles!!! This thread alone just svaed me over $300... Thanks guys (and Guy)!
Ray K




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