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Sight and Sound (2002) Greatest Films Club


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#41 of 3783 OFFLINE   Adam_S

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Posted January 29 2003 - 05:19 PM

ahh I see that Red Shoes is on the list, but I was absolutely stunned to see it the lowest ranked Powell/Pressburger on the list, I've only seen Black Narcissus, but I found Red Shoes to be superior to it (though I enjoyed it a great deal).

counting Red Shoes and The Seventh Seal brings my total for the list to: 64.

Lew, I saw Bicycle thieves for the second time about two and half weeks ago, I also hadn't seen it in a while, and I also didn't like it nearly so much as I did the first time. Perhaps it is a film that has a very strong and powerful initial impact, but it is an response that does not hold true for all viewings? That would also explain its gradual slide down the list from number one. Italian NeoRealism is an interesting bit of film history, with some utterly incredible films, but it also seems to be a pretty limited form/code to work under (like Dogma 95, which is just ridiculous in my opinion).
 

#42 of 3783 OFFLINE   Tim RH

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Posted January 29 2003 - 06:32 PM

Just saw Sansho dayu (SANSHO THE BAILIFF) for the first time. Unfortunately, I don't have time to post my thoughts on the film right now except to say it more than lives up to it's reputation. Absolutely outstanding! I've got to see more Mizoguchi movies... (The only other one I've seen being Ugetsu monogatari, which is also a masterpiece, IMHO.)

#43 of 3783 OFFLINE   Kirk Tsai

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Posted January 29 2003 - 08:25 PM

Tim, I didn't see An Autumn Afternoon because of you, but I certainly was glad to see others holding it so high. I've just been trying to watch as many Ozu films as possible, but local video stores don't carry many. Posted Image

I actually got a chance to see Bicycle Thieves again last year, and the impact it had on me was significantly stronger than my first viewing of it. The tragedy of the film haunts me throughout; everything comes together at the end on the first viewing, but I didn't get into the process so much. Now I see the tenderness of father and son along with the brutal circumstances more clearly than before.

#44 of 3783 OFFLINE   SteveK

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Posted January 30 2003 - 12:37 AM

This sounds like an excellent idea. Is there any way to make this topic a "sticky" so that it doesn't get lost? Although there may be enough activity in this thread to keep it near the top anyway.

I don't have time right now to go through the list in detail, so I'll send a private message later with my count of films I've seen.

Excellent idea!

Steve K.

#45 of 3783 OFFLINE   Pascal A

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Posted January 30 2003 - 02:18 AM

Quote:
Absolutely outstanding! I've got to see more Mizoguchi movies... (The only other one I've seen being Ugetsu monogatari, which is also a masterpiece, IMHO.)

Yup! Kenji Mizoguchi's 1950s films are especially steller. Around 1954, he already knew that his health was failing, and he tried to complete as many films as he could. To a minor artist, that would have resulted in a complete mess, but in Mizoguchi's case, it became an increasingly formidable list of masterpieces: Crucified Lovers, Empress Yang Kwei Fei, Street of Shame. Definitely try to catch Life of Oharu if you get the chance; it's my favorite film. Here is my Melbourne Cinematheque annotation for the film.

Umm, did I mention that Kenji Mizoguchi is my favorite filmmaker (along with Yasujiro Ozu, Carl Theodor Dreyer and Robert Bresson)? Posted Image
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#46 of 3783 OFFLINE   Lew Crippen

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Posted January 30 2003 - 04:09 AM

Quote:
ahh I see that Red Shoes is on the list, but I was absolutely stunned to see it the lowest ranked Powell/Pressburger on the list,

Adam, IIRC, Mike Powell wrote in his autobiography that his favorite was Black Narcissus.

I prefer ‘Red Shoes’, but I find the subject matter so appealing (and it is done so well and with such love), that my judgment might not be solely about the merits of either movie. At least I don’t have to choose and can watch either whenever I feel the need.

I’m been thinking about my slight shift in view on The Bicycle Thief, and after reading your comments and Kirk’s think (at least today) that my initial reaction to this film was so high, because I saw it for the first time, when I was also becoming familiar with the French ‘New Wave’, seeing such films as The 400 Blows, Shoot the Piano Player and Breathless for the very first time. So I was introduced to Italian Neorealism at the same time as the New Wave (very early 60s for me) hit.

And hit hard, after watching the Hollywood fare of the 40s and 50s.

I am still moved, as Kirk writes, by the interaction between father and son and the husband and wife and … . But you are probably correct in that the movement was limited. For example, Two Women seem to have dropped from sight altogether, even though it stars Sophia Loren in an award winning performance.
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#47 of 3783 OFFLINE   Brook K

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Posted January 30 2003 - 04:56 AM

Bicycle Thieves has increased in it's power and effect on me as I've seen it more, as a father I always think about my own children and what I would do in the same situation, but as far as De Sica goes, I prefer The Children Are Watching Us and Umberto D. I've also found, based on what I've seen so far, that I prefer the films of Rosselini and Visconti.

I don't find that the power of neorealism has diminished at all, just as the new wave films remain energetic and vibrant. But then I also think Dogme is one of the most interesting things going on in film today.

I desperately wish more Ozu and Mizoguchi were available. The video stores around me had nothing but Ugetsu, which has become one of my favorites. I'm finally going to rent The 47 Ronin from Netflix, but other than that, I'll have to wait for the new Ozu releases, hopefully this Fall.

I added a bunch of these films to my Netflix list, but haven't adjusted the order, so it will still be a few weeks before I make an entry. I'm concentrating on watching 2002 films and Criterions right now. I think Wages of Fear will be my first.
2002 Sight & Sound Challenge: 321  Last Watched: L'enfance Nue
Last 8 Films Watched: In the Loop - A- / It Might Get Loud - B+ / What Just Happened? - B / Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs - C- / Drums Along the Mohawk - A- / Punisher War Zone - B+ / Moon - C+ / A Man For All Seasons - B+

#48 of 3783 OFFLINE   Tim RH

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Posted January 30 2003 - 07:45 AM

Pascal: no video store in my city (that I know of) has a copy of LIFE OF OHARU or THE CRUCIFIED LOVERS, much to my dismay. But I do have access to Mizoguchi's SISTERS OF THE GION, THE STORY OF THE LATE CHRYSTANTHEMUMS, EMPRESS (or is it Princess?) YANG KWEI FEI, THE 47 RONIN and STREET OF SHAME (maybe one or two others I'm forgetting also), so I will be sure to see all of those when I get a chance.

The saddest thing is that there are no Mizoguchi films on DVD in Region 1 yet except for 47 Ronin, correct? Is the quality of that disc any good? Where's Criterion when you need them?! Posted Image


#49 of 3783 OFFLINE   Lew Crippen

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Posted January 30 2003 - 08:24 AM

Quote:
as a father I always think about my own children and what I would do in the same situation,
As we all do, Brook. The whole thing with the father so desperately desiring his son’s approval (especially after his wife makes it plain that she thinks he does not stand up for himself enough) is just so painful. To then end with the attempted theft and shared understanding is both heart-wrenching and thought provoking.
¡Time is not my master!

#50 of 3783 OFFLINE   Nick C.

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Posted January 30 2003 - 09:40 AM

With the help of my terrific local library system, I'd like to participate...Disregarding Godfather/Three Colours repitition, I'm at 46

...but I've got 3 Truffaut films on the way from said library Posted Image

Quote:
Yi Yi...But I also found the business relationship in the film to be aggravatingly cliche and naive
assuming you're talking about the Japanese business contract, and perhaps the Buddhist 'charity' situation...these sitatuations are there just for that purpose, to show the inhumanity of things that take place in life, side by side with the profound and extraodinary--even if it's just a boy who swims with all his clothes on. along with the personal choices and poetic moments in life, there comes the seemingly predestined, the bland, the "cliched"
later Pooh...

#51 of 3783 OFFLINE   Kirk Tsai

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Posted February 01 2003 - 11:42 PM

122

All About Eve was an awesome movie. This is the kind of movie that would work superbly as a soundtrack, and only better paired with the visuals. Considering that there are six major characters--as opposed to, say, two in His Girl Friday or The Lady Eve--it's incrediable to watch them all deliver lines with bite and move the story foward. The central figures of Margo and Eve start and end up completely different from where they started. Mankiewicz's opening scene is brilliant, setting up the story sophisticatedly with a voiceover that pairs up with the expressions of the actors. The finale is somewhat predictable, but it shows us what we have seen before in Eve without knowing it. I was especially impressed with Davis and George Sanders, who just opens his mouth and chews up Eve in a thrilling confrontation scene.

#52 of 3783 OFFLINE   Joshua_Y

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Posted February 02 2003 - 02:22 AM

Huh? Bunch of artsy fartsy movies that Ive never seen, besides Seventh Seal, Seven Samuri, etc. Ehh....whatever. Any list that doesn have Star Wars on it aint good in my book.

#53 of 3783 OFFLINE   george kaplan

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Posted February 02 2003 - 02:42 AM

Uh, Star Wars is on the list at 157.
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#54 of 3783 OFFLINE   Joshua_Y

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Posted February 02 2003 - 08:44 AM

Oh...my bad....well...it should be way higher, like top 10 high.

#55 of 3783 OFFLINE   Darren H

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Posted February 03 2003 - 03:37 AM

Friday was a beautiful day here, so I spent my lunch break walking down to the city library, where I rented a few of the S&S films that aren't yet available on DVD. Unfortunately, two were P&S, but I don't really have any other options.

- Bunuel's Un Chien Andalou
- Rivette's Celine and Julie Go Boating
- Mikhalkov's Burnt by the Sun

My response to Un Chien Andalou can be found on my film diary, and I plan to add the others later today.

http://www.longpause..._diary_2003.htm
[ long pauses ]

#56 of 3783 OFFLINE   Lew Crippen

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Posted February 03 2003 - 04:53 AM

You must promise me never to use those bad words again.

I promise—unless I get mad at somebody



The Magnificent Ambersons was just on TCM and, as always when watching this movie, one is left with the question in evaluating the movie, ‘Can the ending be ignored?’

I choose to ignore the final reel and choose to focus on the remainder of the film, where Wells draws an even shaper portrait of a complete man, than he does in Citizen Kane. Plus the presentation of what was even then, a bygone era is so clear and so believable, that we almost believe that we are there.

One can only wonder what Wells might have produced, had he been given a freer hand in post-production.
¡Time is not my master!

#57 of 3783 OFFLINE   Tim Raffey

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Posted February 03 2003 - 05:40 PM

I saw a 35mm print of Zemilya (Earth) on the weekend, which I found extraordinary. Not only did the picture have the good ol' Soviet silent pace, but it had an absurd sense of humour and a great mise en scene--in contrast to Eisenstein's stoicism and unnerving composition . Though I'm wondering if it is fair to compare the two, especially since Zemilya was one of my favourite cinema experiences in a long time with an awesome--improvised--live accompaniment (I've only seen Eisenstein's pictures on video). Either way, I think--having also seen Zvenigora & Arsenal (w/ live music as well), Dovzhenko is certainly up there with my favourite of silent filmmakers.
"Kids today are scum. They haven't invented cigarettes, or bluejeans--nothing." - JLG

#58 of 3783 OFFLINE   Lew Crippen

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Posted February 04 2003 - 03:27 AM

I’ve seen Battleship Potemkin on a big screen with a full symphony orchestra. One of my favoriate cinema-going experiences.

I have not seen anything by Dovzhenko; however and really look forward to this.

Is this print making the ‘art house’ circuit or did you just luck out? I ask, as if it’s making the rounds, I’ll postpone renting or buying the DVD until it shows up in Dallas.
¡Time is not my master!

#59 of 3783 OFFLINE   Brook K

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Posted February 04 2003 - 06:27 AM

I'm getting jealous at all the movies you all are seeing that I have no access to. Posted Image Wages of Fear and the Sirk movies should be my first entries. One or two should show up by this weekend since I just mailed two Netflix back today.
2002 Sight & Sound Challenge: 321  Last Watched: L'enfance Nue
Last 8 Films Watched: In the Loop - A- / It Might Get Loud - B+ / What Just Happened? - B / Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs - C- / Drums Along the Mohawk - A- / Punisher War Zone - B+ / Moon - C+ / A Man For All Seasons - B+

#60 of 3783 OFFLINE   Lew Crippen

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Posted February 04 2003 - 07:36 AM

My advice, Brook: ‘don’t bother to clip your fingernails now'. By the time Wages of Fear is over, you’ll have them down to the quick. Posted Image
¡Time is not my master!


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