1. Guest,
    If you need help getting to know Xenforo, please see our guide here. If you have feedback or questions, please post those here.
    Dismiss Notice

What resolution are Progressive Scan DVD Players?

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Jemi, Dec 12, 2005.

  1. Jemi

    Jemi Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2004
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    These marketing schemes keep deceiving me; I don't know whether DVD players are true HD or not! I do not believe they are.... are they only in 720p if you get a progressive scan one and hook it up with HDMI/DVI/Component cables? I think DVDs max out at 720p, and we'd need HD-DVD's or Blu-Rays to have full HD (at least at the highest HD we have for now, 1080p).

    Am I correct? I'm thinking of getting component video cables for my progressive scan DVD player and a coaxial cable, but will they be outdated very soon?

    Specifically, will coaxial and optical audio cables ALWAYS be the best medium for the highest end sound systems, or should I wait out on that too?

    Thank you very, very much.
     
  2. Dick Knisely

    Dick Knisely Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    0
    Current DVD's are, when output from a progressive scan player, 480P. US HD implementations are 720i, 720p, 1080i and 1080p. Many DVD players can upconvert the DVD content to 720 or 1080--in which case they need component video or DVI/HDMI to carry the signal. Someday we may actually see HD DVDs but I'm not holding my breath or standing in line for one just yet. IMHO that format has a lot of maturing to do before I spend money on it so I don't believe your current player with or without the component cables is going to outdated soon.


    More than one issue here. First is why would you replace what you have with something else--probably expecting a major improvement in how things sound. You might and you might not -- so many variables determine how a system sounds that its not possible to say replacing cables will always improve the sound quality. Second "always" is a very long time[​IMG] Theoretically, HDMI could/should replace all the current audio/video connection types -- but in practice will it? Maybe, but not soon would be my impression. So is it worth running out and getting a digital coax/optical cable and use it -- maybe. Yeah, not the simple answer you'd like but truthful. Personally, I always opt for a digital connection if available but in all honesty that's as much for the convience of one cable as anything. It won't hurt anything and the cables aren't horribly expensive, "try it, you might like it".
     
  3. John S

    John S Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2003
    Messages:
    5,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    DVD's are 480i on the discs themselves..
     
  4. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    6,531
    Likes Received:
    15
    As above, if you want to upconvert your DVD's to HD, you need an upconverting player and a HDMI/DVI cable (whichever one your display accepts). If you only want 480p, component cables are sufficient. For "digital" coax, use one of the yellow cables that came with your DVD player, that's all it needs. Don't pay a fortune for a "digital" cable, that's the marketing scam... er, ah ... "scheme" I wrote about above.
     
  5. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Well-Known Member
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    11,281
    Likes Received:
    502
    Location:
    Since 2006
    Real Name:
    Cameron Yee
    But does scaling to 720p or 1080i make it truly HD or merely conform to a spec? Is it only the spec that defines it as HD?
     
  6. Dick Knisely

    Dick Knisely Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nope, the upconvert does just that, make it ready to display on an HD device whose native resolution is one of the HD standards. No more information at all -- that's the purpose behind the real HD DVD but that's mess right now with the conficting formats. Some of those should start appearing on the market "real soon now".
     
  7. John S

    John S Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2003
    Messages:
    5,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    On the scale to note...


    We get into where we want to draw the line on what is really HD....


    I mean does it have to be shot with HD cameras? How close does film get? Older film?



    I have no real opinion on this. But for the pure, HD probably means a lot of things from start to screen output.
     
  8. Dick Knisely

    Dick Knisely Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    0
    John, while I agree that purists might debate the issue, I think its pretty clear that no matter what you do to a 480i source its not going to be high definition.

    From the www.dtv.gov glossary:
    "Upconverting: Process by which a standard definition picture is changed to a simulated high-definition picture."
    The operative word is simulated.

    When the TV is an HD compatible device it will display in its native resolution and in that sense everything it displays is HD but I don't think the result is going to match the common idea of what an HD picture should look like.
     
  9. John S

    John S Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2003
    Messages:
    5,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree not HD, I am just thinking of the upconverted HD movies the big three networks like to show more than anything.


    They assert them to be HD, and they really aren't either, they just got some extreme quality scalers. [​IMG]

    I'm pretty happy with what I get with scaling today's DVD's to 1080i. I am leary of the price point of real HD media when it becomes available. I'd probably favor what I get with a scaled to 1080i $14.99 480i NTSC title over $30 and up for the same title in real HD though in all honesty.
     
  10. John_F

    John_F Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 1999
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0

    720i isn't really a US standard, is it?

    Thanks,
    John Flegert
     
  11. Dick Knisely

    Dick Knisely Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    0
    If I remember the info on the www.dtv.gov site correctly, there are something like 18(??) individual combinations of specs that are "standard" for US broadcast digital TV but for pragmatic reasons only a few are implemented and in use. I think 720i is one of the US standard but not implemented by the broadcast media.
     
  12. John_F

    John_F Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 1999
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    I see 18 ATSC formats listed (from another site), and not one of them is 720i.
     
  13. Rocky F

    Rocky F Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2002
    Messages:
    371
    Likes Received:
    0
    "I mean does it have to be shot with HD cameras? How close does film get? Older film?"

    There are other threads which answer this question, and I don't know all the technical issues, but the short answer is, 35mm film has a much higher resolution than 1080, actually closer to about 4000 lines, so converting films, even older ones, to high definition is not only possible, but it is actually downconverting.
     
  14. John S

    John S Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2003
    Messages:
    5,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks, I had always been curious about that....

    Older films, it often comes down to the condition and amount of restoration that has been done as well.
     
  15. Dick Knisely

    Dick Knisely Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    0

    Give the man a prize--he passed the test :!:

    Don't believe that one? Yeah, me either... well not the first or likely to be the last time my memory was faulty. But then I do qualify for a genuine "senior moment" [​IMG] now and again. And, hey, I got the 18 right.
     

Share This Page