1. Guest,
    If you need help getting to know Xenforo, please see our guide here. If you have feedback or questions, please post those here.
    Dismiss Notice

What is better? DTS or Dolby Digital?

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by kurt_fire, Feb 19, 2003.

  1. kurt_fire

    kurt_fire Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    0
    my receiver can decode them both, which spr dvd should i buy, DTS or dolby digital? which one sounds better?
     
  2. Lee Carbray

    Lee Carbray Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2002
    Messages:
    308
    Likes Received:
    0
    It is probably a matter of preference, but DTS is less compressed so it should sound better. Also the DD and DTS tracks are not always mixed the same so that throws every thing for a loop.
     
  3. JeremyFr

    JeremyFr Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Messages:
    794
    Likes Received:
    0
    DTS is definately better if you ask me, less compression better frequency range than D.D. also less noticable compression artifacts with DTS. its just IMHO an all around better sound quality. DTS has 2 compression rates, 1.509Mbps and 754kbps where as DD is set at 640kbps on DVD Format so even the lower quality DTS is higher than the only DD format.
     
  4. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,769
    Likes Received:
    2
    Sigh.

    This "more compressed, less compressed" nonsense is getting old. (And Jeremy, at least one of your figures is wrong; 640kbps isn't officially part of the DVD spec.)

    The real answer is that, after thousands of messages back and forth on this and numerous other forums over a period of many years, there is no agreement on which sounds "better". Both should be capable of reproducing the original master with little or no loss of fidelity. Many of the differences that people claim to hear are attributable to either different mixes or a lack of comparable volume levels when doing the comparison.

    Bottom line: If you have a choice, choose whichever sounds best to you.

    M.
     
  5. JeremyFr

    JeremyFr Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Messages:
    794
    Likes Received:
    0
    excuse me Dolby runs typically 448kbps and 384kbps, the demo stuff I have is recorded at 640k DD
     
  6. Adam Barratt

    Adam Barratt Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 1998
    Messages:
    2,346
    Likes Received:
    1
    Real Name:
    Adam
     
  7. JeremyFr

    JeremyFr Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Messages:
    794
    Likes Received:
    0
    I hate to tell you your wrong on that last one

    http://www.dtsonline.com/dtsposition.pdf

    Read Points 2a and 2b and you will see that DTS is actually better.

    DD combines frequencys above 15khz at 448kbps and above 10khz at 384kbps, dts does not combine frequency at any range or data rate, and offers up to 19khz response at 48khz sampling and 784kbps and up to 24khz once again 48khz sampling at the 1.509Mbps rate.
     
  8. Jeff Pounds

    Jeff Pounds Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2000
    Messages:
    386
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  9. Adam Barratt

    Adam Barratt Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 1998
    Messages:
    2,346
    Likes Received:
    1
    Real Name:
    Adam
     
  10. BobAZ

    BobAZ Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2002
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
  11. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 1997
    Messages:
    19,149
    Likes Received:
    242
    Real Name:
    Cees Alons
    A big disadvantage of DTS is of course that it's less compressed and thus takes much more space on a recording medium.

    And about the "automatic pilot" argument that more compression is always bad soundwise, let me add a different angle:

    The video colour signal is one of the most badly compressed and altered signals we ever had. Mind you: of all the infinite frequencies of the visible spectrum, we compress it to... only three (and even tamper with that). It's like representing a whole octave of sound by well-chosen mixtures of the notes C, F, and A. That's terrible!

    Or is it? In fact we use a peculiar property of our vision, namely the fact that it is only sensible to three distinct colours (the "cones" in our retina), to reproduce almost all perceived colours with great "accuracy and crispness" (etc.).
    Someone who would be able to see the real colour-frequencies (with an eye like our ears) would not, or hardly, recognize the colour images we project or display or print. But most of us even know no better than that "all colours are made up of three basic colours". Yeah, you bet. That's only how we see them.

    Conclusion: the amount of compression of a signal provides us with no absolute indication for its perceived fidelity.

    Fact is, you can compress
    (1) lossless
    and/or
    (2) lossy, but with great regard to the physiological properties of our senses
    with no perceived loss.
    So, please, DTS advocates (and everyone who wants to has a perfect right to be that), stop using that silly argument.

    Cees
     
  12. JeremyFr

    JeremyFr Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Messages:
    794
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  13. Blake R

    Blake R Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2002
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dolby actually has a DD/DTS listening comparison report on their web site if anyone's interested.

    As far as data rates are concerned there is a little known codicil of information transmission theory which stipulates that any analog signal can be accurately reproduced in the digital domain if that signal is sampled at a rate two times the highest frequency present in that signal. Once you've oversampled twice you're really overdoing it. After that, your bandwidth is being consumed by things you simply cannot hear.
     
  14. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,505
    Likes Received:
    0


    Which of course has zero to do with this particular argument. This idea, which is commonplace digital theory, simply relates to sampling rates (how many samples per second are made when creating and digital representation of an analog waveform to achieve a certain freq response).

    The issue of data compression and codec use comes after this sampling stage. It's a matter of taking these already digital audio info and reducing it to a more manageable size by discarding dynamics and masking things based on psychoacoustics.

    -vince
     
  15. JeremyFr

    JeremyFr Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Messages:
    794
    Likes Received:
    0
    yeah we know about the dolby site and I posted the links to DTS's responses to Dolbys "test" of sorts.
     
  16. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2000
    Messages:
    1,998
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Real Name:
    Greg
    Get the DTS version of SPR (The DTS version used a better mix of the soundtrack). For other films there is not a huge difference between DTS and DD (when the same masters are used).
     
  17. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 1997
    Messages:
    19,149
    Likes Received:
    242
    Real Name:
    Cees Alons
     
  18. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2001
    Messages:
    8,399
    Likes Received:
    0
    hey, what's that in the corner?

    looks just like a dead horse....

    [​IMG]
     
  19. David Giesbrecht

    David Giesbrecht Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 28, 2001
    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't know why people have to argue about this, the difference is clear

    DTS: 96 khz, 24 bit, 108db dynamic range

    DD: 48 khz, 16 bit, 100 db dynamic range

    DTS has the POTENTIAL to sound better than Dolby Digital period.
     
  20. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,769
    Likes Received:
    2
     

Share This Page