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RG6 or 59?

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by JoseLH, Oct 31, 2006.

  1. JoseLH

    JoseLH Well-Known Member

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    What's actually better for component? I've been hearing different things from different people about these two. Can either be used for subwoofer cable?
     
  2. Jim Mcc

    Jim Mcc Well-Known Member

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    RG6 for both. Comp. cables are cheap enough, so I didn't bother making those. But I used RG6 to make my 30' sub. cable.
     
  3. JoseLH

    JoseLH Well-Known Member

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    So it does work for the subs! Thanks! This is what is on the cables in my walls. i just now got to take a look, they have HD 59 on them with the words "High Definition" on them instead of the usual RG.
     
  4. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Well-Known Member

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    My take, especially for component, is, if you've got one, use it. If you're going to buy, get the RG-6. If you're doing HD-SDI or something like that, use the RG-6. If you're doing SD, then pretty much anything you do is okay with RG-59 - unless, maybe, you're doing really long runs (>200 feet.)

    Leo
     
  5. ScottCHI

    ScottCHI Well-Known Member

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    Either should work fine for sub cabling. RG6 is slightly more shielded.
     
  6. CameronJ

    CameronJ Well-Known Member

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    RG59 has a 20 gauge inner conductor, while RG6 has an 18 gauge connector. This ends up translating into a thicker cable overall (.242 vs. .332 inches outside diameter) and less loss on the cable. I believe RG6 has a signal loss of around 7db over 100 feet while RG59 is around 10db over 100 feet.

    I also don't believe that the amount of shielding is included in cable specification, rather you can buy RG59 or RG6 with different levels of shielding. I think Belden makes both RG59 and RG6 with about 5 or 6 different types of shielding.

    For longer runs - RG6 is generally preferred. However, if you are going short distances and need a flexible cable, a high-quality RG59 may be better (as RG6 is not nearly as flexible).
     
  7. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Well-Known Member

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    ...though if you really need flexibility, I know Beldin also makes versions of RG-59 (and maybe RG-6) that are stranded. They really are flexible, but they also really limit your options for terminating the cable. (Compression connectors are right-out. A number of crimp connectors are out, too.)

    Leo
     
  8. JoseLH

    JoseLH Well-Known Member

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    Well, my RG 59's have been giving me a hard time with finding connectors. I had to go to a local Home Theater store to get RCA connectors that fit right!
     
  9. homthtr

    homthtr Well-Known Member

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    Yes the Center dicore on the 59 is much smaller then the RG6. Much less insulation.

    If you use Compression fittings Thomas & Betts part #SNS59 is the correct f-connector.

    http://www.mjsales.net/items.asp?Fam...=263&Cat2ID=90

    Then you could convert the F-connector to RCA for your sub with an F-RCA

    [​IMG]
     

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