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Replacing speaker terminals on receiver....

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Matt DeVillier, Aug 14, 2001.

  1. Matt DeVillier

    Matt DeVillier Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering how difficult this would be. I have an old pioneer DPL receiver that has the 'snap down' type speaker connectors but they don't hold the wire in very well at all, and it the wires are frequently coming loose or falling out. I'd like to replace them with 5-way binding posts. I'm decent with a soldering iron so I'm guessing this shouldn't be too hard, right? the hardest part should be fitting the new post on the back of the receiver
    any suggestions are appreciated [​IMG]
    thanks
    -Matt
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  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

    Wayne A. Pflughaupt Well-Known Member

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    Wayne
    Matt,
    I did this once for my sister’s budget rack system. It is a Pioneer with the same snap-down speaker terminals. The problem is, if you try to use “real” (read heavy gauge) wire, they will break like toothpicks. This is probably why you are having problems with the wires falling out.
    This will be a challenge unless your receiver has wires going from the circuit board to the speaker terminals on the rear panel. Unfortunately, this is usually not the case. Probably what you will find is that the speaker terminals are soldered directly to a vertically-mounted circuit board directly behind them.
    You will not be able to simply remove the old terminals and install the new ones in their place, because the (+) and (-) spacing for the new binding posts will not be the same as the stock terminals. So, the first challenge to overcome (and it is the biggest one) will be finding enough vacant real-estate on the receiver’s rear panel to add five new binding posts. Even worse, there has to be adequate clearance inside the receiver at this location to allow drilling and cutting the necessary holes. Since most receivers are pretty cram-packed inside, this is probably what will brick-wall the project.
    If not, you’re the luck one. Cut or drill the necessary holes in the rear panel to mount the new binding posts, being careful not to hit any internal circuit boards. I recommend a battery-powered drill set to slow speed. Use a high-powered electric drill at your own peril. You will also need to find a way to minimize the accumulation of shavings, like putting a damp rag in an appropriate place.
    Of course, if you’re the lucky one with wires running between the speaker terminals, it will be easy at this point to make the connections to the new binding posts.
    If your receiver has the aforementioned vertical circuit board, you can use an ohmmeter to find where each speaker terminal shows up on the circuit board. Each (+) terminal should have a specific, isolated spot on the circuit board that will show continuity. The (-) connections will all show common continuity. When you have located each connection, solder a 20 or 22 ga. wire to the appropriate terminal on your binding posts. Don’t try to do an upgrade to “manly” heavy-gauge wire! It will require a lot of heat and could do permanent damage to the circuit board.
    Of course, you will have to find a way to label you new binding posts so you can identify the proper channels.
    Good Luck,
    Wayne
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  3. Matt DeVillier

    Matt DeVillier Well-Known Member

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    it looks like replacing the terminals won't be possible because they are soldered to a vertical PCB. is there anything I can do to fix the broken spring clips? they are fine unless the receiver is moved, which normally wouldn't be a problem but it is on a sliding tray above the cd player (which gets moved) so the wires don't stay in place very long
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