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My 85L Vented Shiva Project Questions

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Gerry S, Dec 9, 2003.

  1. Gerry S

    Gerry S Well-Known Member

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    I am making good progress on building my subwoofer, and had a question concerning mounting the plate amp.

    I'd like to mount the amp in the cabinet, but don't want to do this if it will have a negative effect on the performance of the sub. The plans themselves make no mention (good or bad) of mounting the amp, so I thought I would see if anyone could give me the thumbs up or down concerning mounting the amp in the cabinet. If I do mount the amp it looks like it must go in the front panel(front according to the plans).

    Thanks.
     
  2. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Well-Known Member

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    Gerry,

    I've mounted the amp to the back of similar subs many times. I usually just cut out a small "notch" in the brace to allow for clearance for the amp.
     
  3. Gerry S

    Gerry S Well-Known Member

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    What do you think of mounting it to the "front" where there is no brace? Is there really a "front" to a subwoofer in terms of placement of the sub?
     
  4. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Well-Known Member

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    Gerry,

    It really doesn't matter. You can mount it on any of the vertical surfaces. You may even be able to offset to one side so that it doesn't interfere with any of the bracing.
     
  5. Gerry S

    Gerry S Well-Known Member

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    One more questions concerning mounting the driver. Should I use some T-Nuts or just go with the coarse drywall screws?

    thanks,
    Gerry
     
  6. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Well-Known Member

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    I don't like T-nuts since they have a tendancy to break loose from the MDF. So the coarse thread drywall screws would be a better choice, IMHO.
     
  7. Gerry S

    Gerry S Well-Known Member

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    I am starting to think about the veneering part of the project. I'd like to round over the vertical corners of the cabinet. The router bit I have is a Crapsman bead/corner bit, and I cant seem to get it to work without a bead. The larger bearing (the one I think I need to use) doesnt have a slinger washer so I cant get it centered.

    Anyways I am thinking about buying a new roundover bit. Since I am finishing with 10 mil paperback, are there any suggestions for which size roundover bit to use?

    Thanks.
     
  8. Dean-P

    Dean-P Well-Known Member

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    3/4" roundover...
     
  9. Michael Hartwig

    Michael Hartwig Well-Known Member

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    For my Tempest Octagon sub I made a seperate cabinet for the sub amp to sit in and have it positioned with my other audio gear. You only need speaker wire going to the sub cabinet. As for mounting the sub I always use T-nuts. This gives you the most secure mount. The key to sucessful use is to make sure you install them correctly (drill press facilitates in a true perpendicular mounting hole (miss aligned holes is probably the most common cause for failure); the hole has to be large enough to accept the sleeve; hammer the t-nut in (have a solid surface to hammer on), don't try to suck it in with a bolt.) I use T-nuts frequently in my furniture building projects and have had no problems.
     
  10. Larry Alan

    Larry Alan Member

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    Brian,
    I don't understand why the Tee nuts come loose. If they were mounted on the inside with prongs facing toward the outside, they can't come loose. Do you mean they break the mdf because they are so close to the edge? I was planning on using tee nuts, so your input is greatly appreciated.
    Larry Alan
     
  11. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Well-Known Member

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    Larry,

    Yes, the T-nut can tear through the MDF; even if it isn't near the edge. I had this happen to me when installing some of the T-nuts for the black chrome spikes that PE sells. I think threaded inserts are a much better solution.

    Gerry,

    A 1/2"-3/4" roundover will work fine for 10 mil paperbacked veneer.
     
  12. Gerry S

    Gerry S Well-Known Member

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    The plans call for 3.5" long legs. I did that and then rounded over the corners. Problem is I rounded over the top lip on a couple of legs. So if I trim off 1/8" to clean up my blemish I'll end up with legs that are 3 3/8" long. Problem?

    I could always just throw some wood putty on the edge and then round it over again as well. What do you guys think?

    I probably sound real anal! I just want this to turn out as clean as possible. Plus I also want a good solid surface to attach the veneer to.

    In hindsite, I think if I use a fence on my router table I wont have this problem. Live and learn.
     
  13. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Well-Known Member

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    Gerry,

    Not a big deal. You could cut them down to 3" high and still be fine.
     
  14. Gerry S

    Gerry S Well-Known Member

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    I used wood glue, clamps and brads to construct the cabinet today.

    I was curious about using caulk on the inside seams to seal the cabinet. Is this a necessary step for a vented sub, given my construction technique?

    Thanks.
     
  15. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Well-Known Member

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    Gerry,

    If you have nice tight joints with no gaps and have any squeeze out into the cabinet then using anything on the internal seams really isn't necessary. I used to use silicone all the time when building boxes, but as my abilities improved I moved away from doing this.
     
  16. Gerry S

    Gerry S Well-Known Member

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    I do have squeeze out which almost looks as if I did caulk it so I'll probably pass on this step.

    Thanks.
     
  17. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Well-Known Member

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    Gerry,

    No problem. I hope you've taken pics along the way! [​IMG]
     
  18. Gerry S

    Gerry S Well-Known Member

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    Well I am going to start taking some pics today. It's pretty uneventful, except for a tiny screwup on one of the sides.

    I'm off to get some finishing supplies: contact cement, wax paper, 6" foam roller, sandpaper, and maybe a new belt sander! Am I forgetting something?

    Anyway I have been unsure how to proceed on a couple of things. I want the legs and the cabinet to appear seamless. I have rounded over the legs just as I will the cabinet and intend to mount corner of the leg flush with the corner of the cabinet. That's no big deal. But for the veneer to appear seamless as well (consistent grain pattern), it looks like I will have to mount the legs first, then apply the veneer. This sounds challenging for a first timer. Also, veneering the bottom may be a challenge as I will have to work around the mounted legs. I think I'm up to it, but just wanted to see if anyone has any suggestions, considering my goals. If you think this idea is a recipe for destruction, let me know.

    Finally, I am starting to think of which color stains or dye to use. I am using red oak veneer. I had thought about a high gloss black, but now am also considering trying to match our entertainment center, which is a golden oak. Are there only certain stains I should consider for red oak veneer, or will anything work?

    Thanks,
    Gerry
     
  19. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you've got everything you need except for maybe a utility knife to cut the veneer. Veneering the legs as you say may be a bit difficult not having veneered before, but it may not be too bad. I'd suggest skipping veneering the bottom and just painting it black. Or you could veneer the bottom, attach the legs, and then veneer the rest of the enclosure.

    Check Minwax and see if they have a golden oak stain. Their is a Honey Maple gel stain that might be similar. I'd be sure to wait a few days after veneering before staining to make sure you've got good adhesion.
     
  20. Gerry S

    Gerry S Well-Known Member

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