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Multi-channel analog input vs digital inputs?

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by MiguelP, Sep 21, 2006.

  1. MiguelP

    MiguelP Well-Known Member

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    Alright let me start with most dvd players having either a digital optical input or coaxial digital input maybe even both which most dvd players have both features.

    As oppose to other dvd players they also have Multi-channel analog inputs for sound formats such as SACD and DVD-Audio handling bit rates such as 24-bit rates 192khz. I notice some SACDS sampling rates lower than 192khz like 177khz


    Let me get to my point here when I watch Dolby Digital/DTS encoded dvd movies sometimes I watch them through the Multi-Channel analog input used for DVD-Audio/SACD. Is it just me or the soundtrack sounds much louder compare to using digital optical/coaxial.

    I know theres a limit to digital optical/coaxial sources where they cannot handle higher sampling rates over 96khz and Multi-Channel analog sources can. Are they really dvd movies out there with a higher sampling rate?
     
  2. Seth=L

    Seth=L Well-Known Member

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    The volume has nothing to do with sampling rates or frequency brandwidth.

    What causes the difference in volume is the output levels of both the 5.1 outs of the DVD player and the outputs of the processor section of your receiver. Once the digital data is decoded in your receiver or DVD player it has analog outputs in some form or another that have a set voltage and wattage they output, some are variable.
     
  3. MiguelP

    MiguelP Well-Known Member

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    You maybe right because its hard to compare a 44khz signal to a 192khz when listening to music sources. I've compared Audio CD and SACD and I see no difference in Volume except the fact that SACD has more data information because of the surround information and clearer sound,but volume does have nothing to do with it,but I notice the frequency bandwith of SACD which is 5x more than regular Audio cds.

    I've done some stupid tests myself when I compared audio cd to sacd. Its really hard to tell by thier same volume up close,but I notice that If I go outside about 40 feet away from home theater playing SACD the frequency bandwith is really wide and I can still hear the music coming out from the SACD soundtrack. I tried doing it with audio cd and the sound is dead from that range. So yea at some points volume is involve, its hard to tell when up close though.


    As for mutli-channel analog and digital are you saying the digital data part is
    "fixed?" I'm confuse dude.

    Or when watching/listening to dolby/dts encoded dvds through the 5.1 outputs on the dvd is the digital being converted to analog or is it the other way around?
     
  4. dany

    dany Well-Known Member

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    When your analogs are used,the receiver isnt doing much of anything inc any decoding or converting. Most the time when someone brings this up,either through the analogs its louder or not as loud they need to check the setup in the player to see if the db for the speaker setup is the same as the receiver. I could be wrong?
     
  5. ScottCHI

    ScottCHI Well-Known Member

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    Are your player's bass management settings absolutely identical to your receiver's?

    Did you calibrate your multichannel analog connection level trims to the same exact levels as your digital connection, by either using your receiver's multichannel analog input channel level trims or by using the player's analog channel level trims?
     
  6. Ben_Caoile

    Ben_Caoile Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for bringing up the dead, but multi channel inputs are new to me. Now from my limited knowledge, I gather that it is mainly used for DVD-Audio and SACD. Can these inputs also be used for movies? I am certain that the DAC in my player is far superior to the one in the receiver I plan to get. If they can be used for movies, logic tells me to let my player do the decoding and have the receiver amplify the sound, ultimately receiving the "best" sound quality possible with my current setup.

    If I will hear no difference, I do not intend on pursuing to setup my system in this fashion, rather, use my optical connection instead, and have my analog outputs for 2-channel stereo for music listening, as I do not intend on buying SACD's or DVD-Audio in the near future. However, I am also wondering if that media can be decoded by receivers via the optical/coax connection?

    My player is a Pioneer Elite DV-47ai, currently I own a Sony sub-par low-end receiver, but plan on upgrading to a Yamaha HTR-5950.
     
  7. bassman99floyd

    bassman99floyd Well-Known Member

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    I am only using my multi out's to connect audio from DVD to receiver. It works perfectly for dvd's, sacd's & dvd-audio. Using these connections, the only control I have is volume. I can not alter, bass, treble, or balance. I figured this is the way this was meant to be heard and the way it was recorded.

    Is that a true statement?
     
  8. Jack Gilvey

    Jack Gilvey Well-Known Member

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    Well, your own speakers and room are most likely dramatically altering bass and treble anyway, so some sort of correction might actually get you closer to what's recorded (especially for the bass/subwoofer). And, of course, you'd still need to apply appropriate calibration and bass-management.
     
  9. Ben_Caoile

    Ben_Caoile Well-Known Member

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    Generally speaking though, would the best sound quality be achieved by using the seperate outputs?
     
  10. Jack Gilvey

    Jack Gilvey Well-Known Member

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    No. You need an HDMI connection (or a proprietary one like Denon's) and a capable receiver/player to pass those formats digitally. SPDIF can carry stereo 24/96 PCM, but I'm not sure if it can do that with DVD-A.
     
  11. Ben_Caoile

    Ben_Caoile Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for helping me understand this part of home theater Jack. I still have a couple of questions though. Is it safe for me to assume that multi-outs are an analog signal? If they are, would it still be necessary to connect the dedicated stereo analog RCA outputs for 2-channel stereo music? I am fairly certain that my DVD player has a superior DAC than my receiver.
     
  12. Jack Gilvey

    Jack Gilvey Well-Known Member

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    Most likely not...try connecting just the L and R from your 5.1 outs and make sure you get all your stereo sources just to make sure. You might have to play with the Setup menu a bit. I only connect the 5.1 outs from my Denon 2900 and Oppo 970 and I get everything, stereo and MC.
     

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