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Midway between Dolby and Analog when it comes to base management.

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by BernardFrost, Jun 1, 2012.

  1. BernardFrost

    BernardFrost New Member

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    Hi there.
    I’m having trouble to find a “midway” when it comes to base management between Dolby content and analog music.
    I don’t have the luxury of setting LFE settings for DTS and DD and this is probably the only answer. However, when I have the base for regular music just right, the base on DD movies is too much. Getting the base on the movies right, means thinner base for music.
    I have an entry level Yamaha amp RXV371
    Mission MV8 series speakrs, all set on large, except for the centre and rear speakers.
    Mission MS10 sub. Crossover set at 80hz on the amp and at 200hz on the sub. I’m running the sub level at about 45% and 50% on the amp, which produces too much LFE when I’m watching a movie like KING KONG, for example, but is sufficient for music.
    The dynamic range on the amp is set at MAX as I hate compression.
    Is there a midway, which will prevent me from adjusting my sub levels between programs? Getting some kick ass punch when it comes to action movies, which the sub is most certainly capable of doing and a solid base line in music?
    Your help will be greatly appreciated as this driving me insane!
     
  2. Jason Charlton

    Jason Charlton Ambassador

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    Hi Bernard,

    Have you tried setting your main speakers to small (or rather, set the crossover on them to 80Hz from within the receiver's audio setup menu) and enabling your subwoofer all the time?

    I wonder if when listening to music (stereo) sources, you're only hearing sound from your two main speakers (sufficient bass) but when you go to digital 5.1 the subwoofer kicks in as well, resulting in a bass "doubling" if you will.

    By engaging the receiver's crossover on the main channels, and routing low frequencies for ALL sources to the subwoofer (thus converting your 2.0 stereo configuration into a 2.1 stereo configuration) you'll be operating a common speaker configuration at all times, and you will then be able to adjust the subwoofer gain/volume to a sufficient level and it should be much more consistent when switching between music and DD.

    Give that a try and see if you get better results.
     
  3. BernardFrost

    BernardFrost New Member

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    Hi there.
    Thank you for taking the time and responding to my post. The first time I tried to submit it the server told me there was a problem and I had to try again, which I did, therefore the duplicate.
    I did try changing the settings for the front L an R speakers to small, but found a gap in the frequencies. The solution of course is to increase the cross over setting on my amp, but this causes a spatial shift in the overall sound. Because our home theatre is situated in an area which is completely open plan, I had to put the sub in the corner to help with amplification. Higher cross over makes the bass therefore come from of the corner where the sub is, which is not what I want. The setting for stereo is 2.1, and I can hear the sub working, but not as much as with Dolby.
    I played around with the settings over the weekend and made sure that I got things just right when listening to a DD signal, using several movies as reference. I discovered that the “Bass Boost” option on the amp boosts the sub significantly. It is a small price to pay, I guess, but when I listen to cd’s (PCM) I use this option, which I found actually helps a lot. The same goes when I watch regular content. I always smile when I see the “Bass boost” button and never thought I’d be using it, but it seems to serve its purpose now. The bass boost goes of course when I watch a movie, otherwise the sub will overpower the whole system. So, not entirely an ideal solution, but it is better than continuously messing with the sub settings.
    Something else to note is that the Audio Dynamic Control option also help with getting more bass on regular analog content, like TV programs not broadcast in DD. The only problem though is that you compress the already compressed signal even more, so I’m very careful to use it.
    Again the only real solution would be an amp that allows one to adjust the LFE settings for Dolby and DTS, but for me such an amp is not happening soon!
    Thanks again!
     
  4. gene c

    gene c Well-Known Member

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    Some receivers/pre-amps have a settiing in their setup menu to reduce the subwoofer output level by 10 db in Stereo mode. My Outlaw 990 had this option.
     
  5. Selden Ball

    Selden Ball Well-Known Member

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    Putting a sub in a corner tends to accentuate a very narrow range of low frequencies -- the ones corresponding to your room dimensions. This plus having the main speakers set to full range would explain why movies seem to have excess bass.
    You might want to consider doing a "sub crawl": put the sub in your primary listening position and then go around the room listening for the best sound. Then put the sub there. Sound will travel over exactly the same paths going from the listening position to the speaker position as from the speaker position to the listening position. The best location probably won't be in a corner, and might not be in a location that's convenient for people, so some compromise probably will be necessary.
     

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