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Matt Jeffries, designer of original Starship Enterprise, dead at 82

Discussion in 'TV Shows' started by Peter McM, Jul 21, 2003.

  1. Peter McM

    Peter McM Well-Known Member

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    Jeffries was Art Director for the original Star Trek series 1966-1969 and his influence is evident in designs today. The well-known "Jeffries tube", access tunnels on all vessels, were named in his honor.

    My condolences to the entire Star Trek family.
     
  2. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Well-Known Member

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    A brilliant designer, a true loss
     
  3. Tony Whalen

    Tony Whalen Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hear this news! Matt must have been very proud, considering how long-lived his designs continue to be! Designer of the one-n-only NCC-1701. (No bloody A...b...)

    Rest in peace Matt!
     
  4. Chris Lockwood

    Chris Lockwood Well-Known Member

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    > The well-known "Jeffries tube", access tunnels on all vessels, were named in his honor

    Interesting. I always assumed that name came from a fictional character.
     
  5. Ric Easton

    Ric Easton Well-Known Member

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    His design was instantly recognizable. Even to non fans. He made the Enterprise as much a character of the show as the actors.

    Ric
     
  6. Peter McM

    Peter McM Well-Known Member

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    For those who may not know, the shooting model of the U.S.S. Enterprise used in the original series is now on permanent display in the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum in Washington, D.C. It measures somewhere beween 9 to 12 feet in length--I can't remember exactly.
     

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