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LCD backlight bleed

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Paul_III, Aug 29, 2010.

  1. Paul_III

    Paul_III Well-Known Member

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    I bought a Samsung LN52B750 last summer, and for a while I thought it was a great TV. Then I moved into my new apartment and started noticing that the corners of the tv were bright during dark scenes or when just flipping channels etc. I then did some research and found that this apparently is a standard problem with LCD. As it stands now, I've tried all the tricks, lowering the backlight, etc but its done nothing. I cannot watch anything without immediately being distracted by the backlight bleed whenever a dark screen comes on. I'm not sure if when I moved (three blocks and the TV was placed in its original box) somehow we screwed something up? I'm torn right now between selling the TV for a huge loss (I spent $2300 on this thing and I'm guessing I'd be lucky to get 1400), or just taking a complete loss and taking it apart so I can see what causes this problem. Can anyone provide me with a technical explanation for this issue? I've heard all the explanations about screen uniformity, but without pictures or seeing it firsthand I can't grasp why this problem exists - do the TV manufacturers just not care??? I'm seriously bummed out about this, I have a $2300 paperweight in my living room because I just cannot watch anything on it because the problem irritates me so much. Is the only solution to buy a plasma? Ugh, I'm venting but I can honestly say buying this TV was the worst purchase I can think of.
     
  2. Worth

    Worth Well-Known Member

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    It's simply one of the flaws of LCD technology. I work with professional, studio LCD monitors and all of them exhibit the same problem to a greater or lesser degree.

     

    The best way to minimize it is to watch with some ambient light.
     

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