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FCC Allows the F* word, rumor or truth?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Bill Griffith, Nov 18, 2003.

  1. Bill Griffith

    Bill Griffith Well-Known Member

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    Is this rumor or true?

    Just talked to someone and he says that the FCC has allowed the use of F*** for anytime on TV or radio, as long as its not used when relating to sex.

    Hard to believe as I can't find any other information other than this e-mail he showed me.

    personally I'd rather see complete nudity allowed, than this. In fact I figured that would have been the next thing allowed.
     
  2. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Well-Known Member

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    Where do these things get started?

    While I don’t know for sure, I am reasonably certain that if this were the case there would be a considerable mention of the policy change in the press—and a predictable outcry.

    Why would your friend think that the FCC changed their criteria?
     
  3. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Well-Known Member

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  4. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Well-Known Member

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    By the way, you probably could get away with using the word in a paid political ad for radio or TV, provided the candidate's voice is also heard in the commercial. Years ago when sh*t and its variants were still banned there was a radio ad for Barry Commoner (IIRC) that started with the word "Bullsh*t!" Turns out that FCC broadcast standards rules do not apply to purely political speech in the form of campaign ads that meet the criteria. You can say anything you want in those, and the FCC won't intervene. So presumably you could have an ad today that says, "F*** [insert name of politician you most hate here]" and nobody could lay a glove on you. Of course, it is an open question whether you'd turn off as many voters with your vulgarity as you attracted with your directness.

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  5. ThomasC

    ThomasC Well-Known Member

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    Bono said "fucking brilliant" on the Golden Globe Awards when he accepted his award for the band U2. You can read the FCC's report about it here:

    http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_publi...-03-3045A1.pdf

    Just because it's okay to do it doesn't mean that the networks will dare to do it on a taped show.
     
  6. John Thomas

    John Thomas Well-Known Member

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  7. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Well-Known Member

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  8. Ike

    Ike Well-Known Member

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    Reading that report, it does sound as if a non-sexual use of fuck is allowed. It's on page three, and I won't retype what it says, but as long as it isn't about sex or "excretory" functions, it isn't within "the scope of the Commision."

    So, you could say "fuck" I think. I mentioned this to a friend, and he told me that he was listening to the (OTA) radio, and he heard them broadcast a couple of songs completely unedited with F-bombs in them. I asked him if the F word was used in a sexual context, and he said no. So, I'm going to assume that that's the law now.

    That said, I don't care. It's time that TV caught up with what movies have been doing since 1968.
     
  9. SteveA

    SteveA Well-Known Member

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    If I understand this correctly, use of the "f" word will not be punished if used as an adjective or adverb ("F**king brilliant"), but using it as a verb ("I f**ked Heather - twice, but with no love, and never again") is strictly forbidden.
     
  10. ThomasC

    ThomasC Well-Known Member

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    SteveA, that's correct.
     
  11. Bill Griffith

    Bill Griffith Well-Known Member

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    http://capwiz.com/afanet/alert4124576.html

    this is the link that he got in his e-mail. I'm not sure about the valididty of this sight or anything. The article soudn kind of childish in nature.

    "Hollywood is rejoicing" thats kind of a silly statement.
     
  12. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Well-Known Member

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    As will most. They've now set a precedent that will get them sued later on should they try and fine someone for a similar usage.
     
  13. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Well-Known Member

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  14. ThomasC

    ThomasC Well-Known Member

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    I quote from the website that Bill linked to:

     
  15. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Well-Known Member

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    i must say i have no idea which 'f' word many of you are talking about. in most cases, you cover up the rest of the word with *'s instead of letters, how are we even supposed to know what you are talking about? [​IMG]

    anyway, there are plenty of F bombs in radio. and what about the new years eve broadcast of the south park movie on comedy central? if you missed, it, they dropped F bombs just for the sake of dropping them. no censoring of the language whatsoever. the novelty wore off very quickly, as did south park...but how did cc get away with it? did they plan for a surge in viewers and advertising to offset the fines? or did they have no fines against them at all? it was on pretty late, and honestly, they are just words, you hear worse language in middle school. (probably from watching those movies)
     
  16. Chris_Morris

    Chris_Morris Well-Known Member

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  17. Darren Davis

    Darren Davis Well-Known Member

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    Christ, I asked a question about the "shit" episode of South Park on this very forum and was told that the FCC doesn't regulate Comedy Central because it's a cable channel. I guess the channel can technically say what it wants. Not sure, though. Anyone out there own a TV station? [​IMG]
     
  18. MikeDeVincenzo

    MikeDeVincenzo Well-Known Member

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    No worries, people.

    The FCC knows what's good for us. And we can't handle the f-word.

    To paraphrase Cartman, "It will warp our fragile little minds"
     
  19. Matthew Todd

    Matthew Todd Well-Known Member

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  20. John_Berger

    John_Berger Well-Known Member

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