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Drywalling ceiling with uneven floor joists

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Dan_Morez, Dec 16, 2003.

  1. Dan_Morez

    Dan_Morez Agent

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    The area of the basement where I am building my home theater has uneven floor joists. I am concerned that when I drywall I will have a wavy ceiling. Does anyone know a good way to fix the floor joists so that the drywall can be evenly installed? I've thought about scabbing 2x4's but don't know how difficult this would be. I've also thought about using resilent channel, and shimming it under the joists that need it...I've never done this before so I don't know how practical or how well it would work. Does anyone have any experience with this or any alternate suggestions? Any help would be GREATLY appreciated.

    P.S.
    There are pics of my basement at the bottom of this post. Copy and paste to see them.

    Thanks,
    Dan M.
     
  2. EricWT

    EricWT Extra

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    I have not yet tried the resillient channel idea, but I am about to-- I am helping a friend redo the ceiling in his kitchen, and the house is quite old, and has quite a few sistered joists that are now eneven with the others.

    My comment is that there is a couple down the street who suggested that to us, as they had just finished it with great success. They didn't end up shimming too much, as the channels "flexed" into line with the drywall: apparently it is stiff enough that it can squeeze in or out a neighbouring channel.

    We will do this in a couple weeks, so I'll let you know how it goes...

    Eric
     
  3. Glenise

    Glenise Supporting Actor

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    The guy that did my ceiling just did the whole thing at the lowest point so it would look even thoughout.
     
  4. Tom Kay

    Tom Kay Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Dan

    I too am about to add resilient channels, first to the walls, and later to the ceiling. My joists are similar to yours, I suspect, maybe not as bad.

    One thing I did was to take a few joists that butted up to other joists, and jack them up with a car jack, then add joist hangers. This can only be done if a joists T-intersects with other joists. This may not describe your case. This was in an area that had our front door entrance upstairs, and for some odd reason, the builder simply nailed them in place through other main joists at a T-intersection. Over 40 years, the nails were showing why they should not have been trusted to hold up that part of the floor, without the help of joist hangers. Quite an obvious sag.

    In your case, if you're talking about joists that simply hang down lower than others, in the middle of your room, I would add some shims if the height difference is big, then add the resilient channel. No harm in shimming.

    Good luck. Tom.
     
  5. Michael S

    Michael S Agent

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    Where does a person purchase resilient channels??

    Michael S.
     
  6. Tom Kay

    Tom Kay Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Michael

    When I first started doing my basement reno, I really had little idea what resilient channel was for, or where to get it. But since doing some research, it's pretty basic.

    Any Home Depot should have it, or almost any other drywall sales place. Make sure you get the kind that attaches to the studs or joists on one plane, and allows the drywall to be screwed onto it in another plane. In other words, avoid the hat-shaped metal channel if your goal is to reduce the sound being transmitted through the wall.

    I did a little demo installation of resilient channel and drywall on a few wood studs at home, and I was surprised to see how strong the whole thing seemed, especially since the metal channels seem quite flimsy by themselves. I have not finished my walls and ceiling yet, but I sure am curious to see the results.

    Cheers, Tom Kay.
     
  7. Michael S

    Michael S Agent

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    Tom--thanks for your response to my question about the source of resilient channel for drywall. I was aware of it being sold via the Internet from HT dealers, but had no idea that HD carried it and there is one nearby.

    Now for the dumb question--is the channel installed lenthwise on each stud and plate or is it installed across (perpendicular) the studs?

    Michael S.
     
  8. SteveLeach

    SteveLeach Stunt Coordinator

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    The channel should be installed across (perpendicular) the studs. This web site has lots of info on installing resilient channel. It is a comercial site and they are trying to seel their products, but they also have a huge amount of info available for the reading.

    soundproofing.org/infopages/channel.htm

    steve
     
  9. Dan_Morez

    Dan_Morez Agent

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    Thanks for the help guys. I think I'm gonna go with the resilent channel....does anyone know how much it costs?

    Dan M.
     
  10. Gary Silverman

    Gary Silverman Stunt Coordinator

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    Being on many construction projects over the years, I've seen various methods for addressing this problem. The best fix that I've seen is to install furring strips(1x2's) perpindicular to the joists. These are shimmed to make the surfaces even, and the drywall is attached to them. Furring strips were always used in older homes to make a flat ceiling, but it seems a lot of builders have gotten away from this. I guess to save time and money. Another nail in the coffion of the quality built home.
    It also allows wiring to be run on the bottom of the joists instead of having to drill each joist. As an electrician, I'm thankful for the 3/4" space it provides when I have to fish wires in a finished ceiling.
     
  11. Dan_Morez

    Dan_Morez Agent

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    Since there's only a few joists that are pretty low, about a 1/4" or so...and they run evenly low the entire width of the room. I've also been thinking about using an electric hand planer to make them even with the others. My concern about this is, would it weaken the joists to much? or would it even weaken them at all? also, there are no load bearing walls above these joist. Let me know what you think


    Thanks,
    Dan M.
     

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