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Connecting Creative Inspire T7700 (7.1) to n AV Receiver

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by LWanTeD, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. LWanTeD

    LWanTeD Member

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    Hello everyone,
    I found an old surround speaker system that I used to use with my PC.
    Link: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16836116140
    I want to use to connect it with an AV receiver, and I'm not sure that it's possible. Speakers should be fine I guess, not sure about the sub-woofer though. I've been reading about checking the Ohms and not exceed the one of the receiver. Can anyone explain this a bit please?
    Anything else I should be checking?
    Thanks.
     
  2. Al.Anderson

    Al.Anderson Well-Known Member

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    That T7700 is meant to be used with a computer sound card. Using it with a receiver is really not ideal.
    If you *really* wanted to there's two things you could do. First since the T7700 is powered, you could hook it to line-level outputs, if your receiver had them. You could do that by using these adapters and following the wiring diagram for the sound card (but connecting to the appropriate pre-out jacks instead.
    http://www.amazon.com/ER-3-5mm-Mini-Computer-Stereo/dp/B000LMFS7M/ref=sr_1_3?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1354937152&sr=1-3&keywords=rca+male+to+mini+plug+adapter
    Secondly, you could connect it the regular speaker outputs. You'd have to wire some mini-rca plugs by hand. Since the T7700 is powered, you wouldn't have to worry about the ohm ratings. However, you would be amplifying the signal twice, one by the receiver, and once by the speakers. That would degrade the signal, and if you turned up the receiver too much, would damage the T7700.
    Actually, there's a 3rd option, you could use the T7700 in stereo mode by connecting to the receiver's headphone jack.
     
  3. LWanTeD

    LWanTeD Member

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    Thanks for the quick reply.
    I am confused by the 2nd option. The T7700 speakers are powered? I thought the T7700's main box (which is also the subwoofer) amplifies the sound (When connected to a PC).
    If I connect the speakers directly to the AV receiver, would the "double amplifying" problem persist?
     
  4. Al.Anderson

    Al.Anderson Well-Known Member

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    I didn't get that you wanted to run the speakers separately from the sub. Yes, that removes the double amplification. Then you do have to consider the impedance, and I don't know the rating for the speakers. (It may not be published, since they are designed to be driven by the sub.) If your receiver has a self-protect mode you could try it and slowly increase the volume; if it doesn't shut down, you're good. (If it doesn't have a self-protect mode, then you risk damaging the receiver.) You also still have to rig up a speaker to mini-plug connection.
    Personally, I don't think it's worth the trouble. The speakers are good for what they are designed for, and you can get inexpensive speakers that are equivalent in quality that were meant for use with the receiver.
     
  5. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    I'm going to fathom a guess that these are 3, possibly even 2, ohm speakers based on PMPO.
    There is no "PMPO rating to reality"...
    But I'll take a stab at one. You have 47 watts spread among 7 speakers....so 7 each...for easy math.
    "7 watts at 3ohm PMPO" probably works out to 1 watt in reality. Not worth the trouble. And as for the "cheapest" new receiver where you could hook these up with pre-outs...
    http://www.amazon.com/Onkyo-TX-NR717-7-2-Channel-Theater-Receiver/dp/B007JOO4YS/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1354966346&sr=1-1&keywords=nr717
     
  6. LWanTeD

    LWanTeD Member

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    I found the following on Creative's website, going through it now:
    http://support.creative.com/kb/ShowArticle.aspx?sid=4863
     
  7. Al.Anderson

    Al.Anderson Well-Known Member

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    That confirms what I posted.
    Bottom line, if you have a receiver with pre-outs you're good to go (using the sub for amplification). The site also confirmed that you should not use these with standard speaker connections.
     
  8. LWanTeD

    LWanTeD Member

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    Thanks Al.
    I guess I'll buy a receiver that has PRE OUT and try it out with my speaker system. If it works fine then I'm done, if not, I'll buy a new set of speakers, maybe the "Energy 5.1 Take".
    Do most receivers have PRE OUT? If it's something that drastically increases the price of the receiver, I might better off buying one that doesn't have it and spend my money on a new set of speakers/sub.
    Any thoughts?
     
  9. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    Do I need to re-link the Onkyo NR717?
    Scroll up. That is your "lowest priced" new AVR.
    Now if you want 1-2 years old, sure you can find one cheaper.
    If you want to look through 20 years of AVR for a used one, you can do that as well.
    And no, not all AVR have pre-outs...hence what I said about re-linking the NR717 being the cheapest new one.
     
  10. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    Another good choice, from two years ago...
    http://www.amazon.com/Yamaha-RX-V667-7-2-Channel-Theater-Receiver/dp/B003P2V52M/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1355173674&sr=1-1&keywords=rx-v667
    From 3 years ago...I don't see the remote though...
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/ONKYO-TX-SR707-7-2-Channel-Home-Theater-Receiver-in-GREAT-condition-/170957441485?pt=Receivers_Tuners&hash=item27cddb89cd
     
  11. Al.Anderson

    Al.Anderson Well-Known Member

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    Pre-outs are generally a mid- to upper-end feature. And I still say those speakers are not worth jumping through hoops for. Even if you get a receiver with pre-outs cheap, you're still getting a receiver and not using most of it, becuase instead of using the amplification of the receiver, you'll be letting the low end PC amp (in the sub) drive all your speakers. Again, those speaker are good for what they were designed for - a PC. Save them for that and get something that will be a decent home theater.
    Summary - instead of upgrading your receiver, just get a set of budget speakers for $100-$150. The Energies are a good choice. Start with 2 or 3 if that's your budget.
     
  12. LWanTeD

    LWanTeD Member

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    Yeah that seems the best choice.
    I'll start reading/learning about A/V receivers now. Just one last question (and thanks for all the help You've been providing by the way): Any brand/feature to avoid like the plague?
    I'm asking because once I wanted to buy good headphones, I thought Bose was a very good brand and was going to buy one, until I started reading on audiophile websites that Bose should be avoided at all cost. They have good noise canceling, but audio quality is average.
     
  13. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    The only AVR to "avoid"...
    Sherwood. Don't even ask, just avoid them.
    Harman Kardon. Technically they shouldn't be avoided, but their AVR behave like it is still 2009.
    And I'll add this one, simply because they are a complete joke of a company...
    Sony.
    Sony should change its name to...
    PS3 and movie house....and oh yeah, we still make some overpriced TVs and crappy audio products...
     
  14. Al.Anderson

    Al.Anderson Well-Known Member

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    What Sam said.
    The usual list of decent receiver manufacturers is (in no particular order): Denon, Marantz, Yamaha, Onkyo, Pioneer, Harman/Kardon.
    There's another list if you want to go high end, but there's no need for that.
     
  15. LWanTeD

    LWanTeD Member

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    Ok thanks, I'll look into those. I mainly don't care about 3D, 5.1 is enough. Do any receiver come with a phono amp in case I want to hook my record player to it?
    I know I'm getting off topic here, but I'll ask anyway since you guys are very knowledgable.
    My system will be connected to my PS3, which can decode 5.1 (even 7.1 I think) audio signals and send it to the receiver as LPCM, or just send it in BitStream compressed mode.
    Any advantage of using one vs the other?
     
  16. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    Bitstream makes the AVR decode the lossless. PCM means the player(no matter what the player...as long as it can) does it.
    If you can tell the difference...I'd be shocked...
    Since you want phono...and don't want 3D...
    Are you amenable to buying a used AVR?
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Onkyo-TX-SR707-7-2-Channel-A-V-Surround-Home-Theater-Receiver-BUNDLE-/121037162198?pt=Receivers_Tuners&hash=item1c2e6086d6
    To get your phono input, new, is going to be this...
    http://www.amazon.com/Onkyo-TX-NR717-7-2-Channel-Theater-Receiver/dp/B007JOO4YS/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1355202660&sr=1-1&keywords=nr717 (this is the lowest priced new AVR by anybody...except maybe HK)
    So, $520 for a new one...or I doubt that 707 hits $250, even with shipping. And yes, the 707 is the ancestor(directly) of the 717...
     
  17. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    Or if you want "almost everything" the 717 brings to the table...
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Onkyo-TX-NR708-7-1-Channel-250-Watt-Receiver-/150958595138?pt=Receivers_Tuners&hash=item2325d55c42
     
  18. LWanTeD

    LWanTeD Member

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    I've been reading A LOT about Onkyo's heat problems and output ports failing. Is this issue overblown?
    Am I better off picking another brand just to be on the safe side?
     
  19. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    I have the Integra DTR 7.8. At full bore, I could put a frying pan of bacon and eggs on it. My NR1008 could probably keep my coffee warm in the morning.
    Don't stuff the thing inside a cabinet. You aren't supposed to shove ANY AVR inside a cabinet.
    Amps(except for Sunfire) get hot.
     

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