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Bose 901 problem

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by bessie13, Jul 9, 2009.

  1. bessie13

    bessie13 New Member

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    Hi
    I am looking for some advice.
    I have just purchased some Bose 901 speakers along with the 901VIE equalizer this is matching in with a Onkyo A9755B amplifier. I have connected them up and I just dont seem to be getting the quality of sound that it should have, it seems to have very little base. I have adjusted the equalizer but this doesnt make any difference which leads me to believe it isnt working. It has power and is connected correctly but even when i turn the equalizer off there is no change in the sound. The instuctions mention to turn the tape button on the amplifier off but there is no tape button there is only a tape selector.

    Does any one have any ideas as to why this is happening?

    Thanks

    I have inlcuded a link to the amplifier that is in question

    http://www.intl.onkyo.com/downloads/manuals/pdf/a-9755_9555_manual_e.pdf
     
  2. stereophonic

    stereophonic New Member

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    Your problem may be resolved if you hit the tape selector button, assuming that you have the equalizer connected up as per bose instructions, this is how i run my 901's and works a treat.
     
  3. Stephen Tu

    Stephen Tu Well-Known Member

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    The problem is you have no so-called "tape monitor loop" on the integrated amp, these are highly uncommon these days as cassette tape recorders have fallen out of usage. With tape monitor you can select a source for the tape out, but then hit "tape monitor" to hear the tape in without switching what's going to the tape out. This puts the equalizer in the loop.

    The convoluted way to solve this is to get a separate switch for all your AV components, feeding the output of the switch to the "amp in" on the equalizer. You can also solve this if you have another device you can use as a pre-amp.

    But my primary recommendation is to just get different speakers, Bose isn't highly regarded around here or most forums. If you like good bass (not spelled "base" in this context), look for speakers with large cabinets & large drivers. Or get a subwoofer.
     
  4. George_W_K

    George_W_K Well-Known Member

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    What are you basing your assumptions of sound quality from? Are you comparing to what you've owned previously, how they sounded in the store, etc.? There are many factors that affect sound quality, your room is a very important one. What size room do you have?

    I definitely recommend looking into adding a subwoofer to your system.
     
  5. JohnRice

    JohnRice Well-Known Member

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    I suspect Stephen is right. The type of tape loop needed for the EQ is not included in receivers or Pre/Pros very often anymore. The proof it is not connected properly is that there is no sound change when you turn the EQ off. If it was connected properly and you turned off the power to the EQ, there would be no sound at all.
     
  6. Clinton McClure

    Clinton McClure Casual Enthusiast

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    Welcome to the Forum Greg! I second the getting better speakers idea if at all possible.

    Bose makes lower middle of the road speakers and equipment then charges an exuberant price for them. There is a lot of truth to the saying, No highs, no lows, that's Bose! You have very poor bass because your speakers are not full range (regardless of what they say) and you have no sub. Even the Bose "bass module" is no sub. It's just another cheaply built marketing gimmick. No equalizer in the world is going to fix that. In fact, you can find many better performing and cheaper speakers and subs for the price you paid for the 901 setup.

    Now if you insist on keeping the Bose equipment, you definitely need to add a quality sub (if it is even possible as many Bose speaker setups use proprietary connections to prevent this).
     
  7. Scott Merryfield

    Supporter

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    The 901's are much different that the Acoustimass system, Clinton. I did not own the 901's, but did have their little brother 601's (which did not have the external equalizer) over 20 years ago. From what I remember, the 901's required very precise placement in the room in order to get proper sound. Placement, or your receiver's lack of a tape monitor loop for the equalizer, are probably where your issues lie.

    Honestly, though, the 901's were designed in the mid-1970's, and you can probably find other speakers for about the same price which will be much less finicky to setup and run with modern audio equipment.
     
  8. CB750

    CB750 Well-Known Member

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    I have owned a set of Bose 901 Series II since 1974. To make it as simple as possible the Bose equalizer is wired this way. Receiver pre amp out to Equalizer in. Equalizer out to power amp in. In other words the equalizer does it job between the pre amp and power amp of your receiver. In stereo receiver's which did not have a split pre and power amp section the equalizer would be wired into one of the existing tape inputs/outputs as if the equalizer were a tape recorder. Tape out to Equalizer in, Equalizer out to Tape in. If your receiver only had one tape section the back the equalizer had additional RCA jacks to facilitate the installation and use of a tape recorder.

    You must have the equalizer wired wrong because in either of the methods I have described if the equalizer is turned off no sound will come out of the speakers because you have interupted the stereo signal from your preamp to power amp.

    Believe me the equalizer provides significant boost to the signal from low bass all the way up to the top. Also remember that the 901's are very picky as to where they are placed in the room. As I remember it's about 18' from a solid wall in back and 36" from the side walls and 18' off the floor. The common joke was you buy a par of 901's and then build your room around them. With the right power amp you should be able to peel paint off the walls with a correctly set up par of 901's.
     

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