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A Few Words About A few words about...™ The Lord of the Rings Trilogy - Extended Edition -- in Blu-ray

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Robert Harris, Jun 14, 2011.

  1. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    How many films truly endure decades and the test of time?

    Casablanca, Lawrence of Arabia, The Godfather, The Wizard of Oz, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Gone with the Wind…

    Think about it.

    How many films are purposefully passed down from parent to child, generation to generation, as something that has attained a sense of wonderment, and endures that passage of time.

    From the masterworks of J.R.R Tolkien, filmmaker Peter Jackson has created a motion picture trilogy that not only has that quality to endure, but now Warner Home Video has brought Mr. Jackson’s work to Blu-ray as he wishes them to be seen.

    The imagery and audio of these new editions are not only problem free, but have a very special majesty and exultation about them-- perfect in every frame.

    Make no mistake. The new Blu-rays of Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy on Blu-ray are a ceaseless wonder that will survive the generations. They demand your attention.

    Colin McKenzie would be pleased.

    Very Highly Recommended.

    RAH
     
  2. Jarod M

    Jarod M Well-Known Member

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    I'll be interested to hear your impression of the newly "greened" Fellowship of the Ring.
     
  3. Todd H

    Todd H Go Dawgs!

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    +1
     
  4. Vincent_P

    Vincent_P Well-Known Member

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    The "theatrical" Blu-ray was transfered from a 35mm film-out- so basically, you have a 2K Digital Intermediate for most of the film, that gets recorded back out to film, then they rescanned that outputted negative. If they went back to the 2K DI files here like Robert says they did, then this would be the intended color timing. When you do a scan/film-out/re-scan of the film-out, you're asking for anomalies to pop up.

    Vincent
     
  5. Worth

    Worth Well-Known Member

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    Why on Earth would they have done that? Wouldn't it have been both easier and cheaper to go straight from the DI?
     
  6. Vincent_P

    Vincent_P Well-Known Member

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    The first film wasn't completely finished as a DI. Between 70-80% of the film was, the rest color-timed photochemically, and the conversion from Super-35 to anamorphic was done optically. THE TWO TOWERS and THE RETURN OF THE KING, on the other hand, were completed entirely as DIs.

    Vincent
     
  7. Jarod M

    Jarod M Well-Known Member

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    Some of these anomalies have been illustrated by several screenshots comparing the theatrical Blu-ray to the EE Blu-ray. It's not what most people were expecting, especially those people used to the DVDs and the theatrical Blu-ray. What's better? Obviously that's subjective, and some people will simply defer to whatever judgment has been made by the filmmakers, but based on the screenshots alone, it is perplexing to say the least.

    Another question, which no one has really answered as far as I know, is whether FOTR matches up with the flashback shots in TTT.
     
  8. Lord Dalek

    Lord Dalek Well-Known Member

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    You got to understand Fellowship of the Ring was like the second or third movie ever to use a DI and they hadn't quite figured how to utilize it to its full potential. That said, I'd love to know exactly if this green cast only affects the DI scenes or is the whole movie?
     
  9. cafink

    cafink Well-Known Member

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    So, for the new Blu-ray, Warner went back to the DI for that 70-80% of the film? What about the rest of it? How was it transferred to Blu-ray? I know relatively little about how movies are transferred, and am trying to get a clear picture of what it entails in this case.
     
  10. Douglas Monce

    Douglas Monce Well-Known Member

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    I think you have the ratio backwards. About 70% of the film was done with traditional photochemical color timing. A few select scenes were timed in a computer, really as a test for the future installments.DougEdit: I think you actually maybe right on the ratio, I found this on line, but can't verify how true it is.
    However this would indicate that about 78% of the film was at least 3 very odd generations away from the the ON even before release prints were made, which might explain why the film looks so different from the other two on the theatrical blu-ray release.
     
  11. Flemming.K

    Flemming.K Well-Known Member

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    Does this "new look" represent the original theatrical look? I actually don't remember the movie looking anything like this in the intro sequence (talking about The Shire green cast comparison clip on Youtube).
     
  12. Tom Logan

    Tom Logan Well-Known Member

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    Well, FOTR EE is showing in theaters across the country tonight, correct? Perfect opportunity for a comparison. :)
     
  13. litlgi74

    litlgi74 Member

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    There is no way the mountain snow scene should look like this or ever did in the theater!

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    I believe the point is that footage that went through the DI process is represented in the new Blu-ray as a scanned, combined and corrected element, meaning before recording out to a printing negative. Much of this would be dependent upon how the final printing negs were conformed. If a master negative combining DI footage with original negative was cut, that negative would have gone through two more generations before being printed for theatrical use. I'm presuming that the earlier Blu-ray was created by scanning an IP, which means that we're going back two generations to pre-record data.

    RAH
     
  15. PRO-630HD

    PRO-630HD Member

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    Robert, just to confirm the IP is 1 generation from the OCN, the IN is two generations from the OCN and a print is 4 generations way from the OCN.
     
  16. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    Correct. Normally, today, when you go to a theater and are not viewing a DI, you're watching a fourth gen element.

    RAH
     
  17. Mark Booth

    Mark Booth Well-Known Member

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    Everyone please leave Robert alone so he can actually sit down and watch the movies! The whole world is waiting to hear more of his few words about LOTR EE!

    Robert, It has been suggested that a good way to compare color-timing changes is to compare flashback scenes used in the later films with the same scenes in FOTR.

    Look, there I went and didn't follow my own advice.

    Mark
     
  18. Guest

    I know I talked about this, and I'm bringing it up again..not because I'm complaining but because I'm truly wondering what causes it. I noticed it on the TE blu-rays of LOTR and other transfers (mostly dvds), including the blu-ray of It's a Wonderful Life. What causes faint vertical lines at the edge of the picture when the monitor is set to no overscan? Is it on the film? Is it because there is no more data? A digital artifact? On scope movies, it even cuts into the black bars. Thanks.
     
  19. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    I'm not going to be able to find the time to view all of these.

    That said, if someone would care to give me timecodes from previous releases, I'd be happy to give things a quick look.

    As far as the same footage being used in multiple films for flashbacks, since I don't know the filmmakers, I'm unable to say that
    they didn't want things a certain way. Or it could be an error. Not an expert on these films. Far too new.

    So far I'm very pleased.
     
  20. Mark Booth

    Mark Booth Well-Known Member

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    More fuel for the fire... A video featuring Jackson and Lesnie discussing the digital color grading done to the theatrical release of FOTR.



    After watching that video, I find the color-timing on my theatrical edition Blu-rays to be a lot closer to what Jackson and Lesnie seemed to be after, versus the screen caps we are seeing (mostly on other sites) of the supposed extended edition Blu-rays. In the video, they discuss adding more of a golden hue to the shire (Hobbiton) to bring out the greens, rather than just pumping up the green. That golden hue is how the theatrical Blu-ray looks compared the extended edition screen caps.

    Mark
     

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