Hardware Review Yamaha RX-V375 Home Theater Receiver Review

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Todd Erwin, May 11, 2013.

  1. Todd Erwin

    Todd Erwin Cinematographer
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    Yamaha’s entry-level receiver in their 2013 line, the RX-V375, is a simple, non-networked, 5.1 model featuring lossless audio decoding, 70 watts per channel, 4K and 3D pass-through, and Yamaha’s YPAO sound optimizer. Home Theater Forum received a sample from Yamaha to review, and we put it through the paces.
    Yamaha RX-V375 A/V Receiver
    RX-V375_front.jpg
    I should preface this review by saying that I’ve been a big fan of Yamaha receivers. My first, true home theater receiver was a Pioneer (all it had was Dolby Pro-Logic and 5.1 analog inputs), followed by a Sony with Dolby Digital and DTS decoding (but never sounded quite right). When I replaced the Sony rather quickly with a Yamaha HTR-5940, it was love at first listen. I was not only impressed by the increased clarity of the sound, but with the features included with the receiver, and it served me well for almost two years until it was time to upgrade to a receiver that could support HDMI and multi-channel PCM as well. Since my birthday falls at the end of March, pickings are usually pretty slim on new-in-box receivers as the major manufacturers begin to announce their new lines and retailers clear out last year’s models. So, in March of 2009, I decided upon an open-box Yamaha RX-V563, featuring 7.1 channels and two HDMI inputs (a luxury back then), and opened my ears to Blu-ray’s lossless audio codecs, Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio. My RX-V563 has been very faithful these last four years, but in the time since I last upgraded, the hardware manufacturers have not stood still. When offered the chance to review this unit, I jumped at the chance. While my current receiver supported 7.1 surround and the RX-V375 only supports 5.1, I am not taking full advantage of the additional channels in my current setup and felt confident that this loss would be more than outweighed by the other improvements that the RX-V375 includes.

    New for 2013, Yamaha’s entry-level RX-V375 receiver (list price of $299.99, but street price running around $250) is a slight improvement over last year’s RX-V373. Like its predecessor, the RX-V375 is a 5.1 channel receiver with four HDMI inputs with 3D and 4K pass-through, 70 watts per channel, Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio decoders, adaptive Dynamic Range Control, 192kHz/24-bit Burr-Brown DACs (digital-to-analog converters), YPAO sound optimization, a front USB input compatible with iPod/iPhone and USB flash drives for audio file playback, and an on-screen display. Features new to this year’s model are a discrete amp configuration, low jitter PLL circuitry, and a slightly lower weight.

    Included in the box were the usual accessories you find with a receiver: an AM antenna, FM antenna, YPAO calibration microphone, an IR remote, an Easy Setup Guide, and a CD-ROM containing the full owner’s manual. As with most entry-level receivers, the speaker connections are somewhat disappointing in that only the Left and Right channels use screw-down binding posts that can also accommodate banana plugs, while the Center and Surrounds all use cheaper spring clips For the unit’s intended audience, that is probably not a deal-breaker, although I did need to remove the banana plugs on those speakers to connect to the receiver. In addition to the 4 HDMI inputs, the receiver also features 2 optical and 2 coaxial (RCA) digital inputs, 4 pairs of analog stereo RCA inputs, 2 component and 4 composite video inputs, as well as outputs for HDMI (1), component video (1), composite video (1), and analog audio (2).

    For this review, I connected the RX-V375 receiver to a pair of Polk TSi100 bookshelves, Polk CS10 center, a pair of OSD SPHERE-1 for the surrounds, and an OSD PS10 powered subwoofer. As for components, I connected a PlayStation 3 (slim) to HDMI-1, a Motorola HD-DVR from Cox to HDMI-2, and a Sony BDP-S5100 Blu-ray player to HDMI-3.

    RX-V375_rear.jpg
    Configuration and setup was fairly simple, although it would have been nice if a few extra steps had been included in the Easy Setup Guide, specifically on how to set the receiver for 8 or 6 ohm speakers (factory preset is 8 ohms). The Easy Setup Guide only provides instructions on how to connect speakers, your HDTV, and a Blu-ray player, and run the YPAO tool.

    Using the YPAO calibration tool simply requires connecting the included microphone to the receiver and selecting START from the on-screen menu, and then following a series of steps on screen. For those unfamiliar with these built-in calibration tools, the program sends several signals (including beeps and white noise) to each speaker and the microphone (when placed in the main listening area) detects these signals and confirms the speaker exists (helpful with systems that are not equipped with full 5.1 speaker sets), estimates the approximate distance from the speaker to the microphone (for volume and delay settings) and calculates several other factors, including the speaker size and whether the speaker was correctly connected in-phase.

    Of course, while calibrating with a professional-grade sound meter by an experienced professional would yield more accurate results, these calibration programs are a good place to start for most users to achieve a more balanced surround experience from their home theater setup than just leaving them at the factory settings or by fiddling with a bunch of manual settings. I was very happy to see that Yamaha has made some big improvements in their YPAO tool over the one installed with my previous receiver from the 2008 model year. The program completed in less than five minutes, and detected my speaker size correctly (bookshelves should be setup as small, not large, regardless of their frequency range and power handling capabilities). One area that still needs improvement is the crossover setting for the subwoofer. YPAO suggested 100Hz, but I felt that was too high, and manually adjusted it to 80Hz. I also bumped the center channel volume up 1.0 db above the recommended setting after listening to several movies and TV shows on both Blu-ray and cable.

    Using the on-screen menu, you can edit the input names, assign audio and video input configurations, set the initial and maximum volume, and configuring the SCENE buttons found on both the remote and the front of the receiver. The SCENE buttons provide a quick way to power on the receiver and set it to a specified input. For example, pressing the BD/DVD SCENE button will power up the receiver and set the input for HDMI 1 (the default for BD/DVD).

    For an entry-level receiver, the RX-V375 does a very nice job reproducing sounds and amplifying them without sounding muddy, distorted, or with any added interference. It handled just about everything I played on both the PS3 and S5100, including very high bitrate DTS-HD Master Audio, Dolby TrueHD, Dolby Digital+ (from Netflix and Vudu), multi-channel uncompressed PCM, DTS 96/24, all without any issues. The big surprise (and it is not mentioned in the specifications anywhere) was when I played back several SACD discs in DSD mode from the Sony S5100. The fact that it even detected the DSD stream was a revelation, and the DSD definitely had a slightly warmer sound to it than when I allowed the S5100 to convert to PCM.

    The drawbacks and disappointments were minimal, but worth noting. The remote Yamaha now includes with most of their receivers is NOT universal. In other words, it cannot be programmed to operate anything other than a Yamaha product. Another item that I found quite handy on my RX-V563 (especially when watching a big action film late at night or anything on CBS at anytime of the day) that is missing on the RX-V375 was a NIGHT dynamic compression mode that helped keep the volume from getting too loud (or having to ride the volume control) late at night with a simple press of a button. Lastly, this receiver is obviously for a much smaller listening space, based on its low power ratings, so it is more ideal for an apartment, condo, or small home. For its price, though, the Yamaha RX-V375 packs a lot of features and quality that you likely won’t find on some of its competitor’s similarly priced receivers. If the RX-V375 had just a bit more power, it would be a welcome replacement for my current RX-V563. Recommended

    SpecificationsAmplifier SectionChannel5.1Rated Output Power (1kHz, 1ch driven)100 W (8 ohms, 0.9% THD)Rated Output Power (20Hz-20kHz, 2ch driven)70 W (8 ohms, 0.09% THD)Dynamic Power per Channel (8/6/4/2 ohms)110/130/160/180 WSurround Sound ProcessingCINEMA DSPYesDSP Programs17Compressed Music EnhancerYesSILENT CINEMA / Virtual CINEMA DSPYesDolby TrueHDYesDolby Digital PlusYesDTS-HD Master AudioYesAudio FeaturesYPAO sound optimizationYesAdaptive DRC (Dynamic Range Control)YesInitial Volume & Maximum Volume SettingYesAudio DelayYes (0-250 ms)192kHz/24-bit DACs for all channelsYes (Burr-Brown)Video Features4K Pass-throughYesHDMI 3D passthroughYesHDMI Audio Return ChannelYesDeep Color/x.v.Color/24Hz Refresh Rate /Auto Lip-SyncYesExtensive ConnectionHDMI Input/Output4 / 1HDMI CECYesUSB InputiPod®/iPhone®, USB memory, portable audio playerFront AV InputUSB/Mini-jack/CompositeDigital Audio Input/Output: Optical2 / 0Digital Audio Input/Output: Coaxial2 / 0Analog Audio Input/Output4 (front 1) / 2Component Video Input/Output2 / 1Composite Video Input/Output4 (front 1) / 1PreoutSubwooferHeadphone Output1Tuner SectionFM/AM TunerYesUser InterfaceOn-screen displayYes (Color OSD)SCENESCENE (4 sets)Remote Control UnitYesGeneralStandby Power Consumption (IR only)≤0.3 WAuto Power StandbyYesECO modeYesDimensions (W x H x D)17-1/8” x 6” x 12-3/8”Weight16.3 lbs.Shipping Dimensions (W x H x D)15-5/8" x8-7/8" x21-3/8"Shipping Weight (lbs.)20.94 lbs.

    Reviewed By: Todd Erwin
     
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  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Your review is great. can you tell how or is there a way to enchance the subwoofer bass
     
  3. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    YPAO isn't designed to "enhance the bass". What exactly are you looking for and what is the sub?Enhance means different things to different people.
     
  4. jorge

    jorge Guest

    Thanks for the reply, what i was wondering is there a way to increase the bass sound of the subwoofer.
     
  5. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    Turn it up.
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    i have it all the way up, my last reciever had 5-10-15 and max that would make the bass nicer, i get minimal bass. could there be issue with reciever. Thanks
     
  7. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    What subwoofer is it?We have nothing to go on if we don't know which sub you have.
     
  8. Todd Erwin

    Todd Erwin Cinematographer
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    1. What was the make and model of your last receiver? What is the make and model of your sub?

    2. Did the sub produce any sound when you ran YPAO? If not, the sub may not be hooked up properly, not powered on, or the volume was set too low. The volume on the sub should be at 50% and the crossover cranked to the highest position.

    3. Are your fronts set for LARGE or SMALL? Unless you have professional-grade studio monitors, this should always be set for SMALL, even if you are using towers. In the past, YPAO (and other calibration tools) often got this wrong and even set satellites to LARGE. On the RX-V375, when using SMALL speakers in the front, the receiver automatically sends all of the bass to the sub (essentially "greying out" the Extra Bass option).

    4. You can adjust the volume level for the subwoofer in the Setup Speaker menu. Hit SETUP on your remote, select SPEAKER, then select LEVEL, then toggle down to SUBWOOFER and you can adjust it there.

    5. Your sub should also have a volume control, and you can adjust it there, too.
     
  9. Harry

    Harry Guest

    According to the User Manual (pg. 52), this receiver has an Adaptive Dynamic Range Control (DRC) option that can be set for an input source which will automatically adjusts the Dynamic Range depending on the volume level. I think this is the same as what "night listening" mode does.

    Another fact that should be noted is that the $150 more to get to the next level receiver (RX-V475) only gets you options that are available on several other components a person may have, such as Apple TV, which gives you internet radial, Airplay, NETFLIX, Pandora, other music and video streaming, plus much more for less money.
     
  10. Michael

    Michael Guest

    I have an RV that had a 5.1 receiver with small ceiling speakers, less than 6" in diameter. The speakers are 4 ohm, can I use this receiver?
     
  11. FoxyMulder

    FoxyMulder 映画ファン

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    It could just be that you are used to bloated bass and when you get calibrated bass it sounds poor to you, my experience of YPAO, i own a Yamaha A1010, is that it never quite gets the subwoofer channel correct, it's actually closer if you run it three or four times but it never did it to my liking, i actually set my subwoofer and speakers up separately using a calibration disc and SPL meter, the YPAO is great for distances and did that perfectly, it takes reflections into account, at least it does on the high end ones, but i prefer to switch the YPAO mode off and chose through since i felt high frequency sounds such as cymbals ended up losing impact, i much prefer the straight through option with my own calibration.

    Unlike the reviewer i feel it gets the crossover correct, i feel if you ran a calibration disc and SPL meter on all your speakers you will find one or two are lacking, possibly the surrounds or center channel and that's why it chooses a higher crossover, maybe because of a room mode or maybe the speaker isn't as good as the specs say it is.
     
  12. Bleddyn Williams

    Bleddyn Williams Supporting Actor

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    Hi! Thanks for the great review, which was a consideration in my deciding to actually pick up this Receiver!

    I've had it a week, and yesterday I noticed for the first time a type of distortion, heard with dialogue - almost like a buzz that accompanies the dialogue. Its not there all the time, but can be noticable. My 9-year old daughter noticed it almost straightaway.

    Trying to isolate the problem, it seems to be only coming from the center speaker. I've checked all the connections and they all look fine. What might cause such a distortion, and what could I do to solve this problem?

    Any help greatly appreciated, as always!
     
  13. FoxyMulder

    FoxyMulder 映画ファン

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    Try switching to one of the DSP modes, Standard or Drama, if you have one of the YPAO modes enabled try switching it off and choosing straight.
     
  14. Bleddyn Williams

    Bleddyn Williams Supporting Actor

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    Hi Foxy! Thanks for this - I tried these modes, but they did not make any difference. Do you have any other ideas for me?
     
  15. FoxyMulder

    FoxyMulder 映画ファン

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    I'd need to know a little about your system, what center speaker do you have and what volume level do you listen at, to rule out your center channel speaker being the problem you could try switching a speaker around and plugging in your right or left speaker to the center channel and re-playing one of the discs where the buzzing was heard.

    You say its not there all the time, can you re-play a scene and it's always there or is it intermittent and sometimes you can re-play a moment where you heard it and it's no longer there, a buzz might suggest the speaker is clipping and cannot handle the sound levels you are playing at.

    If it's sibilance that you are hearing then that would be a speaker issue, hard to tell without hearing it though.

    Do you have much in the way of furnishing in the room or is it hard floors and little furnishing. ?
     
  16. Todd Erwin

    Todd Erwin Cinematographer
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    If none of what Foxy recommended helps to isolate the issue, I would contact Yamaha to determine whether or not you just got a defective receiver. There may be a firmware fix for it.
     
  17. voiceoffire11

    voiceoffire11 Auditioning

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    Hello all, I just bought this receiver and it is great so far. However, I cannot find the settings for the video pass through. Does anybody know where this setting is hiding?
     
  18. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    Return it and get the 475.
     
  19. voiceoffire11

    voiceoffire11 Auditioning

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    Does that mean the 375 can't do the video pass throughh? I know it is entry level, but it is only for the bedroom running little Polk satellites.
     
  20. Todd Erwin

    Todd Erwin Cinematographer
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    Do you mean converting composite and/or component video to hdmi (or vice versa)?

    If yes, then no, the RX-V375 can't do that. You'll want to look at the 475 or 575.
     

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