Would this work?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Richard Travale, Jan 14, 2009.

  1. Richard Travale

    Richard Travale Producer

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    Hi all,

    I have a plan to help me get into DSLR photography.

    I should start by telling you that I lost my right hand in an accident years ago. So, seeing as every camera I've ever seen has the shutter release on the right hand side, I need to come up with an alternative.

    So, my thought is this. Could I get a DSLR and a matching remote control and somehow attach the remote to the left hand side of the camera (using velcro or something similar)?
    I guess what I'm asking here is will the remote be able to communicate with the camera from this position?

    If not, does anybody have any thoughts on what I could do aside from holding the camera upside down?

    I would really appreciate any input.
     
  2. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer
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    Richard,

    Using a remote shutter release would certainly work from a technical standpoint. However, if you intend to use this type of a camera setup handheld, my only concern would be whether you could properly stabilize the camera while releasing the shutter.

    If you use a tripod, though, a remote shutter release -- either Velcro-attached to the camera or hanging loose -- would work fine. In fact, a remote shutter release is an essential part of any photographer's kit who shoots with a tripod at slow shutter speeds.

    Wired shutter releases made by the camera manufacturer can be quite pricey for what they are -- at least in the Canon world (I'm not sure about Nikon). For example, the Canon wired shutter release for my 40D costs around $50. I found a third party release that works just as well for $5. I figured that even if it wasn't as well built, I could afford to replace it many times at 1/10th the price.
     
  3. Richard Travale

    Richard Travale Producer

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    Scott, thanks for the reply. I should clarify. Without getting too graphic, I do still have a portion of my hand. The hand was amputated at what is described as the trans metacarpal area...essentially halfway between the wrist and the knuckles. So, I can still use what I have to stabilize and actually use the manual focus ring. I just need(ed) a solution to release the shutter using my left finger without having to turn the camera upsidedown or doing the reach over like I have done with my Point & Shoot.
     
  4. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer
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    Richard,

    Based on what you describe, a remote shutter release would probably work well. You should be able to attach one to the side of the camera via Velcro. Some dSLR bodies support wireless remote releases via receivers built into the body. That would probably be the best solution in your case, since it would eliminate dealing with a cable (but you would need a battery for the remote).
     
  5. GeorgeHolland

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    You mention you prefer not to shoot upside down but I tried it and Professional DSLR bodies and some Pro-sumer DSLR bodies with the optional vertical grip can be used upside down in almost the same yet reversed hand held position as a right handed shooter in landscape orientation.

    For lanscape shooting you just push what is normally the vertical release button while shooting with the body upside down.

    If you need to shoot with the body in a vertical orientation you use the standard shutter release button and while a little awkward, the release button lines up reasonably well for vertical oriented shots.

    Some software programs will even automatically rotate them for you or you can do a batch rotate for easier viewing.

    As a Nikon Shooter, I can only assume Canon would work in a similar fashion. Both manufactures have excellent previous generation bodies available on the used market from people like me that always upgrade to the current model if you need to work within a budget.
     
  6. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Aye, and the Nikon D200 would be one such semi-pro option that you can even get brand new (just the body) from Amazon for just $800 right now. And if you want something newer (w/ a better image sensor, but somewhat lessor build/feature-set) from Nikon w/out paying too much more, the Nikon D90 (body only) can be had for $900-950. You should be able to get the vertical grip for either at ~$150 (maybe less).

    And like George said, Canon probably offers similar options as well.

    And if you want to stick w/ lenses for the Nikon system (for whatever reasons), you might also consider something like the old Fuji S5Pro, which shares the exact same body as the Nikon D200 (but w/ different image sensor and programming), or the S3Pro, which borrows from an old Nikon N80(?) body w/ built-in vertical grip (among other things good and bad). The Fuji bodies tend to be clunky, especially the ones before the S5Pro, but they had their fans in the pro and semi-pro worlds up until the last couple years when Fuji stopped making more. If you don't need more than ~7-8MP quality images and would prefer the higher dynamic range offered at this level (and don't mind their clunkier programming), then those old Fuji's are worth considering.

    Also, another alternative in the used market (for both Nikon and Canon lens systems) would be the couple full-frame Kodak 14MP pro bodies w/ built-in vertical grips. The Kodaks should make decent alternatives, if you don't need the speed and high ISO capabilities of the other more mainstream options.

    _Man_
     
  7. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer
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    The vertical grip idea is interesting, and one I never would have thought of. I've never had the need to use a vertical grip, but Canon does make such devices for their camera bodies, too.
     
  8. GeorgeHolland

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    Without understanding the type of shooting you want to do, advice is difficult to give.

    I am a sports shooter and for the way I work, a remote shutter would not be an ideal solution due to the speed I need to track the subject, fire bursts, and switch bodies since I almost always shoot with two.

    I also shoot in the portrait orientation most of the time and use “AF-On only” for focus acquisition so all the shutter release button does is release the shutter, pressing it halfway does not do anything. Shooting portrait mode without the vertical release and vertical AF-ON button requires a very awkward hand position and results in poor technique.

    For static subjects, a remote would work fine and even a right handed shooter should take advantage of one when using a tri-pod. I’d have to experiment with a mono-pod. Again, for my shooting style, speed of use would be a disadvantage for a remote trigger and just about any lens collar allows you to rotate the camera body 360 degrees so that would be my preference.

    If working fast is not a requirement, a remote sounds like a viable option.
     
  9. Richard Travale

    Richard Travale Producer

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    Thanks for the tips and suggestions fellas.

    George, as I'm only just bumping into the dSLR game i don't think I need or want to get into a pro or pro-sumer model. That would just be too much too soon I think. Based on suggestions from friends I am looking at either the Nikon D60 or perhaps the D90 (but as Man pointed out, I could get the vertical grip for this model...so that may definitely be an option down the road). From what they tell me these are good models that will do very well.
    As for types of photography that I want to get into...I think everything really. I will probably focus at first on landscapes and photographing people, both candid and portrait style. Sports photography would be really cool and I can see myself trying that out (in a more advanced than just shots from the stands setting of course) in the future.

    Man, thanks for the info on the different cameras and lens matching. I'm pretty sure that I will go with the Nikon. I have more friends around here that use the Nikons and this way I'll fit in [​IMG] Seriously though, I have a lot of looking around to do still.

    I do think that at first I will go with the wireless remote shutter release. It really seems like a good easy option to start with.
     
  10. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
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    Would a Bushhawk work for you? Alternatively get a Nikon D300, a tripod and a Phottix Cleon off of Ebay.
     
  11. Richard Travale

    Richard Travale Producer

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    Sam,
    I'm not even sure what a bushhawk is (I just had to google it). It seems like something that would totally work. A little over the top perhaps, but it would definitely work.
    As for the D300 and Phottix Cleon, I think that is definitely a bit (read, a lot) out of my price and expertise range...but definitely cool.
     
  12. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Hmmm... Maybe I should get a Phottix Cleon for my D200 too.

    Richard,

    There's always the option of the D200 + the same Phottix Cleon too, if that works for/appeals to you -- and the D200 is again just ~$800 from Amazon. If you want to go less expensive, maybe go for the D80 instead (for ~$520-540 from BuyDig and B&H) -- and there seems to be a different Phottix Cleon that works for it. You can also get a vertical grip for the D80, if you want at some point. I would recommend against the D60 since the $ savings seems too small to be worth giving up the benefits of the D80 -- and the image sensor should be essentially identical, so no IQ improvement to gain w/ the newer, lower end D60.

    _Man_
     
  13. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
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    Love my Cleon, it's one of the coolest things I've ever gotten off of Ebay. Importing from Hong Kong is kinda weird but it worked fast and easy and low cost.
    Phottix Cleon wireless + remote [Page 1]: Nikon D300 - D100 Forum: Digital Photography Review
    Review of the Phottix Cleon Wired / Wireless Hybrid Remote Control N8 for Nikon D300 / D200 / D700 / D3 / D3X: Digital Photography Notes

    They make em for the mass market Nikons too I think.

    I haven't used a Bushhawk but some folks swear by em especially for wildlife.
    SHOULDER MOUNTS by Bushhawk fast action camera mount and Sports Optics Stabilizer
     

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