which rg6 for making component cable

Discussion in 'Accessories, Cables, and Remotes' started by buster _bb, Jul 22, 2003.

  1. buster _bb

    buster _bb Auditioning

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    i am going to have a go at making a component cable can get 2 types of rg6 one has solid copper core double shielding the other is steel center with copper coating but is quad shielding which would be better thanks
     
  2. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Thou shalt not use copper plated steel unless you are exclusively passing signals above say 50 mHz only. Above that frequency the 'skin effect' becomes dominant and the majority of the signal rides the surface of the conductor. Hence, steel, being cheaper than copper, is used. A penny here and a penny there and several billions of feet later and you're talking real money!
    If your lengths are short, a few meters, then you could substitute RG59 which has a smaller center conductor and this results in a lighter and more flexible cable.
    Since your signals are well below that number it would dictate that 100% copper, stranded or solid, is the right way to go. BTW, if shielding is a big thing to you, I'm sure you can find quad shielded copper over in australia.
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Buster: Can you find out the frequency response (sometimes called "Attenuation") for that coax?

    Like road-surfaces, they are built for different speeds. The CATV stuff works for radio-frequency signals, but not so good for video, or HD video.

    Here are the common max frequencies. You want a coax that will handle 3-4 times this max frequency to handle sudden changes:

    Component Video: 4 Mhz.
    Progressive Video: 13 Mhz.
    1080 HD Video: 35 Mhz.

    So you want a coax that will handle 4 x 35 = 140 Mhz.

    Look for a coax that has a 3 db drop somewhere above 140 Mhz if you are building cables for HD video.
     
  4. buster _bb

    buster _bb Auditioning

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    has anyone tried canare cable i can get it in aus
     
  5. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Canare is fine too. Just about any, I do mean any, solid or stranded copper RG6 or RG59 is going to be vast overkill for running signals from your DVD player to the tv or for that matter into the receiver to take advantage of switching capabilities. Realistically, it only starts to matter when the lengths get upwards of a few hundred feet.
     
  6. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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