"Which Nebula is Real?" by Mel Acheson

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by JParker, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. JParker

    JParker Second Unit

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    [​IMG] A sampler of planetary nebulae. Credit: University College, London and Xiaowei Liu.
    http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2009/arch09/091014nebula.htm See also: http://www.thunderbolts.info/wp/author/mel-acheson/ Good evening, all.
     
  2. Aaron Silverman

    Aaron Silverman Executive Producer

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    James, we can keep this going as long as we're having fun, but IMO it should probably be organized in a single thread rather than starting a new one with each post. For a title, I suggest "Melissa Rauch Appreciation Thread," but if you want to go with something like "Electric Universe Theory," I suppose that would be OK too. :)
     
  3. Stan

    Stan Producer
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    Not sure how serious your question is, but from the photos you posted, I'd say none of them are "real". I love the photos and use Hubble Telescope photos as my computer background wallpaper. But they're all altered, enhanced, colors are added, etc. I still enjoy them, but don't think the word "real" applies.
     
  4. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
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    And it they ARE in any way real realize that they happened long long ago =) +1 to keeping all the pseudoscience to one thread.
     
  5. Stan

    Stan Producer
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    That's one thing I find fascinating about outer space, constellations, nebulas etc. We're seeing images from thousands, even millions of years ago that probably have changed a lot and look nothing at all like they do now if we were closer.For example, the constellation Orion. The stars that create the belt could be long gone, we're seeing the past as the light finally reaches earth.
     
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