What is the bitrate of uncompressed 480p, 720p, 1080p?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Ken Burkstrum, Feb 4, 2006.

  1. Ken Burkstrum

    Ken Burkstrum Stunt Coordinator

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    I fit it all in the title.
     
  2. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

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    Well, let's see here. This is going to sound poor, but 480p and 1080p are monitor resolutions not video specifications while 720p could be either a broadcast spec or a monitor resolution. 480i, 720p, and 1080i are broadcast specs and are variable bitrate and are compressed by definition. The numbers refer to vertical resolution and don't even define the horizontal spec. 480i can be 704x480, 720x480, 352x480, 540x480, etc.

    What exactly are you trying to find the bitrate for? Camcorder capture, TV broadcast, DVDs?
     
  3. Ken Burkstrum

    Ken Burkstrum Stunt Coordinator

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    DVDS=compressed

    TV Broadcast=compressed

    Camcorder Capture=compressed

    DV captures at 25Mbps. I am not sure if that's the bitrate raw 720x480 untouched video is, I doubt it.

    I record 1280x720 computer games at 300Mbps, but I'm not sure if thats it.

    There is a difference between raw no compression and lossless compression, even if it's not noticeable. I'm wondering what it is, my theory on 1920x1080 is like 1.2Gbps but I'm not sure. I speak of video with a framerate of 24 of course. I have no idea what 4:4:4 means when people talk about 1920x1080 so you got me on that one.

    I don't know what kind of technology pro filmmakers with digital cameras like Lucas use, but I'm sure they record at the top of the latter so you could say I'm asking what is the bitrate those ridiculously expensive 1080p cameras they use record at? Or does lucas record even higher...2k? 4k?

    By the way, I thought until recently that all DVDs were 720x480, but I seen alot of articles saying it's 640x480 and I see you battin all kinds of 480s, is there's a single resolution DVDs are released at or is it all over the place?

    You don't have a real widescreen until your record it in that aspect and have a resolution that equals that aspect correct? So I always thought they did 720x480 and just cropped and stretched and did whatever stuff they do that you would technically consider fake.
     
  4. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

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    I forgot about the movie cameras and I don't remember what resolution and bitrate they run at. (2K and 4K sound about right for resolution) Resolution determines the amount of detail and bitrate determines how well motion is converted. 720x480 will capture all the detail a DVD is capable of but a low bitrate will cause artifacts. "Jeopardy" might work at 2Mbps while the "Super Bowl" will run out of room at 8Mbps.
    The mpeg (compression) spec is pretty liberal and VCD, SVCD, XSVCD, CVD, DVD, etc are all subsets of it. Since mpeg is used for Broadcast and CATV transmission, as well as various recording devices, the numbers will be all over the place trying to fit maximum data into the space available. (bandwidth, spectrum, disk space) A DVD should be 720x480 at a typical average bitrate from 3.5 to 4.5 Mbps and a max of 9.8Mbps. You can create one outside these numbers but you risk playback problems if you exceed them. (PAL is 720x576)
    DV is at 25Mbps and is very slightly compressed almost raw IIRC.
    300Mbps sounds like a pixel or clock rate for a graphics chip. Your recording device determines the resolution and bitrate.
    640x480 is not a DVD format but you could be seeing some of the discussions of square pixels versus rectangular pixels.
    For DVD info you should check the official FAQ. http://www.dvddemystified.com/dvdfaq.html and for mpeg start at http://www.mpeg.org/MPEG/index.html , and for creating your own disks http://www.videohelp.com/ .
     
  5. Jongyoon Lee

    Jongyoon Lee Stunt Coordinator

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    Interesting thread.

    While I'm no expert in the video processing, I would imagine that the bitrate is relevant parameter in the compression technology. Bitrate is one indication of how much the contents are compressed compared to the original. In addition, if the compression allows streaming, bitrate indicates the required bandwidth in order to stream the contents without interruption.

    The bitrate of uncompressed digital video can be simply calculated by something like

    {frames / sec} * {pixels / frame} * {bits / pixels}

    I do not know how many bits are needed to represent a pixel in uncompressed video. hmm. In fact, what does uncompressed video mean? I'm not sure if there is video equivalent to PCM of audio.
     
  6. Ken Burkstrum

    Ken Burkstrum Stunt Coordinator

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  7. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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  8. Ken Burkstrum

    Ken Burkstrum Stunt Coordinator

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  10. Ken Burkstrum

    Ken Burkstrum Stunt Coordinator

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    I wasn't talking about your HD-DVD quality I was talking about my 300Mbps being low.
     
  11. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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  13. David Dutton_286985

    David Dutton_286985 Auditioning

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    I know you wrote this YEARS ago, but your info was soooo wrong.. even at the time.

    HD resolutions have always been: 480p, 720p, 1080i, and 1080p, and ALL are broadcast specs as stations, cable TV, and Sat TV "broacast" many things in 1080p. It just was not used for the longest time to the enormous bandwidth it took (and storage space) to run 24-30 FPS with a compression that didn't make things look lossy
     
  14. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    Broadcast does not count VOD.


    OTA has never nor will it ever be 1080P.
     

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