What is SDDS?

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by JJR512, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. JJR512

    JJR512 Supporting Actor

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    Sony Dynamic Digital Sound. I see the SDDS logo at the end of many movies, right by the Dolby and DTS logos. But I've never seen this logo or heard anything about it in conjunction with home theater gear. What is it, and why is it only used for commercial cinemas and not home cinemas?
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  3. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    It was an interesting idea; digital sound on film, plus a back-up track on the film as well. I know early implementations of the readers, combined with some of the issues surrounding the migration to polyestar film-stocks for release prints caused some... incompatibilities in the booth. ("purple dots everywhere!" I remember hearing a projectionist complaining.)


    Leo
     
  4. Lord Dalek

    Lord Dalek Cinematographer

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    SDDS is the original 7.1 audio format, so I assume that's why it never made the leap into the home market. Up until just recently the technology didn't exist to allow for maximum impact.
     
  5. Todd Erwin

    Todd Erwin Cinematographer
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    This was Sony's foray into digital sound for cinema, following Dolby Digital and DTS. Although they managed to get AMC to install the system into most of their complexes, the system was less reliable than Dolby or DTS, and more expensive, and thus Sony has discontinued development, manufacturing, and sales of hardware.


    You still see it on movies released today because there is still a relatively large (but decreasing) install base in cinemas.
     

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