What is high cut?

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Brian Brantley, Dec 16, 2003.

  1. Brian Brantley

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    This is very likely a stupid question but what exactly is a subwoofer's high cut and what should it be on? I have a Yamaha SW150 subwoofer with a high cut range of 40-140. What would you recommend setting it to?
     
  2. Brian Brantley

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    Oh, and I know this isnt the best subwoofer. I'm getting a new one when I get the money and sell this and my HD receiver ($5 a month, my parents could pay, is great). What would you reccommend is best value for its price as far as home theater goes. Don't need it for music. I suppose price range would reach... $500-$600
     
  3. anders

    anders Auditioning

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    1. 80Hz
    2. SVS 20/39 PCI
     
  4. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    High pass determines at what point the high frequencies sent to the main speakers starts, and there will be a slope associated with this point to allow the sub and mains to blend.

    If you aren't feeding your main speakers from your sub, then high pass (cut) shouldn't make any difference. If you ARE, then we need to know the specs (lowest extension) for your other speakers before arbitrarily giving you a frequency. Are there separate high and low pass settings? If not, and you are not supplying the mains singal from the sub, set the x-over to it's highest point and let the receiver take care of it.

    I agree SVS is where you should look for a sub.
     
  5. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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  6. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

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    Here we go

    Low pass ... everything ABOVE the cutoff point is attenuated at a fixed level ... EG a 12Db low pass crossover would attenuate signals ABOVE the crossover point at a rate of 12DB per octave(not including natural rolloff)

    High pass ... everything BELOW the cutoff point is attenuated at a fixed level. Same as above.

    The biggest difference between a high and low pass filter tends to be the fact that a high pass filter tends to have a more aggresive slope since a tweater cannot handle bass.

    Now a bandpass filter give you and option of setting points so you can adjust where the highs and lows are cutoff, thus creating a passband.

    EG a high pass filter of 80Hz combined with a low pass filter of 4Mhz creates a passband of 80-4000Hz
     
  7. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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  8. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    Don't run your mains through a sub like that unless you have to. Better off to hook the sub up to the sub preout on your receiver. Set your speakers to small on the receiver, the sub to yes, and then turn the highcut on the sub as high as it will go to get it out of the way of the receivers crossover.
     
  9. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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  10. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    It's just the direction of the roll [​IMG] That's just how the brain translated the info, but the information is not incorrect, just the way it came out is a little discombobulated. :b

    TomAto - TomAHto [​IMG]
     

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