What exactly is "resilient channel "

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by ScottATL, Dec 9, 2004.

  1. ScottATL

    ScottATL Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know it has something to do with sound reduction, but other then that, what is it, how thick is it, how good at insulating sound is it, and where do you buy it.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Roy Brooks

    Roy Brooks Agent

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    Resilince Channel is a small folded metal channel used to mount drywall on. The wall is strapped with resilince channel which is crewed to the wall studs, then the drywall is screwed to the channel instead of screwing it to the wall studs. The idea is that the channel allows the wall and the channel absorbs the vibration and doesn't tranfer the vibrations to the studs and next drywall face. Home Depot usually sells it.
     
  3. SteveLeach

    SteveLeach Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    0
    This site has plenty of good information on soundproofing in general and RC in particular. Like how to install it and such. It is a commercial site. I have no opinion on the company, as I neather work for them nor have I purchased from them. http://www.soundproofing.org/
     
  4. Travis_R

    Travis_R Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2002
    Messages:
    247
    Likes Received:
    1
    the proper name for that stuff is "Hat Channel" I send you another PM Scott
     
  5. CurtisG

    CurtisG Auditioning

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2003
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Resilient Channel, aka RC channel, comes in two flavors, RC-1 and RC-2.

    RC-1 looks like a flattened out letter Z.
    RC-2 looks like a hat (and also called hat channel).

    RC-1 is typically used on walls.
    RC-2 used on ceilings.

    You can couple RC-2 channel with neoprene clips like the RSIC-1 clips to add even more sound proofing.

    --curtis
     
  6. ScottATL

    ScottATL Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0
    Cool, I'm definitely going to do this on the ceiling. I'm mostly, actually, only concerned about sound traveling upstairs. Is it a PITA to get correct?
     
  7. Mike D.

    Mike D. Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 1999
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    I went over to Home Depot and talked to 4 or 5 guys, none had ever heard of resilient channel! I found a good little site with a diagram, I'm going to print it out and take it back over... But, I couldn't find it on homedepot.com or lowes.com either... Can anyone else by chance?


    http://www.jm.com/insulation/faqs/996.htm
     
  8. Travis_R

    Travis_R Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2002
    Messages:
    247
    Likes Received:
    1
    i dunno what to tell yah, I have never seen Hat Channel at Lowes Or Evil Orange myself, I would look in your phone book for a construction supply place, me and my dad always ordered our specialty materials from a company Called Negwer Materials here in St.Louis, you would have to find something similair to that in your area
     
  9. ScottATL

    ScottATL Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mike, that is a good site, thanks for posting. It spells out how much db noise can be reduced by what exactly you do to your room.

    http://www.jm.com/insulation/buildin...ation/2780.htm

    After reading that, I'm definitely putting in RC. I only wish I would have done a few things differently about an extra sheet of drywall.

    When I built the walls, I framed the walls with my studs running vertically, but then I fastened a 2X4 running horizontally on the back of the wall 12" from the floor, and 12" from the ceiling, so this was sort of RC for the concrete to the new wall. I originally did this for 2 reasons, the first being I don't have to drill holes for running wire and cable, and that it creates an air pocket between the insulation and the concrete after everything is done. It also makes the wall a little more solid, and easier to fasten to the concrete. It looks like doing this will also help greatly with noise spill.
     
  10. Mike D.

    Mike D. Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 1999
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Scott,
    I'm JUST about to start framing, doing Dry Lock today and probably start framing this week.. I want to see if I understand what you did. You added a horizontal 2x4 attached to the concrete, and then attached your framing wall directly to that 2x4, correct? I was thinking about doing that but was afraid all the vibrations would just transfer through the horizontal one into the concrete, and thus into the house. I was thinking of lining the side of the horizontal 2x4 with some sort of rubber or something to minimize this transfer even..

    Sound bleed, ESPECIALLY to the upstairs, is a major factor for me for spousal approval factor! [​IMG] I need to do this right, if possible!
     
  11. Adam Gregorich

    Owner

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 1999
    Messages:
    15,672
    Likes Received:
    671
    Location:
    The Other Washington
    Real Name:
    Adam
    Look for hat channel at drywall supply stores. My theater is "in progress" but we have the drywall up and noise doesn't enter or leave the room! We used a fire rated door, used alternating stud walls, two layers of sheet rock (1 was 1/2, the other 5/8), and RSIC-1 clips with hat channel on the ceiling. My wife was hollering for me all over the house the other day and I didn't hear a thing. She was amazed at how well the sound control worked. havent tested it on a movie yet as it won't be ready for several months...

    Here is what the RC channel looked like just after it was installed:
    http://www.gregorich.com/newhome/Pho...s/photo75.html
     
  12. Travis_R

    Travis_R Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2002
    Messages:
    247
    Likes Received:
    1
    Scott and Mike, that actually is not a bad Idea to put a 2x4 Horizontally on the wall like that, It gives you a bit more to fasten to and the part I really like is scotts idea to run wires behind the wall in that 1.5 inch gap is great. However, sound or vibration in concrete isnt going to amount to much, concrete is the best sound deadener in the world, the sound and vibrations will be transmitted through the top plate of the wall which is attached to the bottom of the floor joists, what I did here is take some pieces of rubber, I happend to have a 5x5 sheet of 1/8" thick roofing rubber that I cut into 1.5" wide strips and put between my top plate and joists just to give that much extra.
     
  13. ScottATL

    ScottATL Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mike, that is exactly what I did. I built the frame wall then fastened the 2 2x4's to it, and put it in place. You will have an easier time fastening the horizontal studs to the wall, then the H studs to the concrete, then if you fastened the H studs to the wall, then the H studs to the wall.

    I used a hammer drill with a concrete bit and some concrete nails to secure the H stud to the concrete. It is probably the most sturdy wall in the house.
     
  14. Mike D.

    Mike D. Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 1999
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Scott! That's exactly what I'm going to do...

    Now, to actually find some RC to buy!!! My next challange.
     
  15. ScottATL

    ScottATL Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just one tip, before you fasten the Horizontal boards to the newly created wall, make sure it is all square before you sink a nail.
     

Share This Page