vinyl vs. multi-layered PVC based material for theater screens

Discussion in 'Displays' started by bowhunter1001, Apr 13, 2013.

  1. bowhunter1001

    bowhunter1001 Auditioning

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    What is better vinyl or multi-layered PVC based material for home theater screens? I don't know if it matters but it will be 120" fixed screen. The vinyl is a 1.0 gain and the multi-layered pvd is a 1.2 gain. It's a dedicated theater room with controlled lighting. I'm using a JVC model DLA-RS56 projector. The seating will be 17' and 23' away from the screen. Both have great frames wrapped in felt and the prices are very comparable.
     
  2. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    Unless you are buying the AT version...it won't really make a difference between vinyl/PVC.

    The gain is the deciding factor here. And there is 1.0 PVC and 1.2 Vinyl.
     
  3. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    By the way, I gave you a wild goose chase.

    You do realize the V of PVC is Vinyl. Vinyl is "shorthand" for PVC, typically...

    That is unless you meant PVC vs EVA, PEVA or one of the other couple "vinyl"....
     
  4. bowhunter1001

    bowhunter1001 Auditioning

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  5. bowhunter1001

    bowhunter1001 Auditioning

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    At first I felt dumb not knowing this but then I did a little research and found out:
    Vinyl is radical of ethene (CH2= CH- ) while PVC is polyvinyl chloride a polymer of vinyl chloride. So they are not the same but close. I don't know if this would make much of a difference for home theater screens.

    Thanks for the input though.
     
  6. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    The relationship of "Vinyl to PVC" is like this...

    All Kobe is Beef, but not all Beef is Kobe.
     
  7. bowhunter1001

    bowhunter1001 Auditioning

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    So is one better than the other? Is the PVC the Kobe?
     
  8. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    Yes, the PVC is the Kobe.

    When you see Vinyl, you ALWAYS have to ask which version they mean...which 90% of the time is PVC.

    The only time PVC is "bad" is when you plan to use the item to eat or drink. Even then, almost all modern plumbing is PVC.

    However, hard PVC(pipe) is not, exactly, the same thing as flexible PVC(spork).

    By the way, in "food items", you are starting to see "BPA free"...one(of many) BPA's "is" PVC(and yes I know that isn't 100% accurate, cause just because something is BPA-free, does not mean it is PVC free).

    Basically the P of BPA and PVC are "related"...kind of like grass and weeds are related(and based on "who you are talking to"...grass and weed are either different...or the same...).
     
  9. Stephen_J_H

    Stephen_J_H All Things Film Junkie
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    Actually, BPA stands for bisphenol A, an additive to plastic which caused concern because it was being used in shatterproof plastics (polycarbonate, etc.) used for water bottles and other drinking vessels. The chemical concerns with vinyl are completely different beasts (dioxins, chlorine [which makes sense; PolyVinylChloride?], lead, phthlates, lead, cadmium, tin... the list goes on). The big issue with vinyl was the number of phthlates and dioxins it contained, especially in flexible teething toys made for toddlers, but since you're not putting your screen in your mouth, it shouldn't be an issue, unless your house burns down. :blush:
     

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