V Compression Information

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Thomas&CJ, Dec 22, 2003.

  1. Thomas&CJ

    Thomas&CJ Agent

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    Hi well I'm still putting a little away every payday toward a new Hi definition TV hope to get one early next year. Well in the meantime I think I want something for the bedroom so I was thinking about getting a 27-inch with the latest inputs component, Svhs. I heard about V-compression while out to Best Buy and recently saw an add for a Toshiba 27 inch TV in Best Buys flyer. They advertised that V-compression gets rid of the cropping in windscreen movies, so I was wondering if someone could take a moment and explain to me how this works, I've heard some similar hype before about different sceams that supposedly get ride of the cropping bars but basically just make everyone in the movie look like a contortionist with stretched faces and the like, well I know you guys can give me the scope so that’s why I stopped by. Wishing everyone a Marry Xmas and a safe and prosperous New Year!! :b

    Tom j.
     
  2. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    I'm not totally sure, but I beleive that's just a vertical raster squish for anamorphic DVDs.
     
  3. Thomas&CJ

    Thomas&CJ Agent

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    So it really doen't get rid of the bars at the top and the bottom of the screen correct?? Thnaks

    Tom j.
     
  4. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    No, it does not. It squeezes the scanning-line raster into a 16:9 window in order to display 16:9-encoded (so-called "anamorphic") DVDs at full resolution. Those aren't "cropping bars," but simply dead, unused space on your screen. Nothing is being cropped; in fact, the opposite: You're seeing the entire widescreen image as a result.
     
  5. Thomas&CJ

    Thomas&CJ Agent

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    Thanks that's what I thought. I told the salesman bascially what you said but he insisted that it would somehow get rid of the bars. it's my understnding that you actually get a higher resolution as a result. Happy Holidays!!

    Tom
     
  6. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Most salespeople in big-box chain stores are woefully misinformed and just plain ignorant.

    A 16:9-encoded DVD does not possess "more" resolution; it displays the same number of lines but in a 16:9 format. If, however, you have a 4:3 display but without the 16:9 compression mode, the player must itself scale the image properly. In doing so, it discards every third line of resolution to produce the letterboxing effect. This is the source of the misguided notion that 16:9-encoded DVDs somehow have more resolution than their 4:3-encoded counterparts.

    Bottom line: Use the 16:9 mode and make sure your DVD player is adjusted to output a 16:9 image. This will have zero effect on 4:3-encoded/"fullframe" DVDs.
     
  7. Thomas&CJ

    Thomas&CJ Agent

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    Got Ya! Thanks and Happy Holidays!! [​IMG]

    Tom
     

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