Universal and TCM's Partnership For Made-To-Order DVD

Discussion in 'DVD' started by JohnPM, Oct 28, 2009.

  1. Brent S

    Brent S Second Unit

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    A hope for that set is MYRT AND MARGE (1933), Universal's sole [Ted Healy & His] Three Stooges holding.
     
  2. JoeDoakes

    JoeDoakes Cinematographer
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    The Mating Season is owned by Paramount. If Criterion doesn't pick it up, hopefully it will be in Olive Films next wave.
     
  3. JoeDoakes

    JoeDoakes Cinematographer
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    I am glad for anyone who is pleased by this release, but considering what's still stuck in Universal's vault, it again raises the question of who the hec is picking the films to be released in the TCM program?
     
  4. JoeDoakes

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    The title raises some question of what it means as Universal owns a lot of rare films. If the set if meant to contain historically important Universal films, Myrt and Marge might make it (IMDB says it was filmed at Universal, but do they own it?). I read somewhere that Univeral was restoring King of Jazz, its early sqawkie musical featuring Bing Crosby's first appearance in film. Another possibility would be Follow the Boys, Universal's WWII musical featuring a famous W.C. Fields routine.
     
  5. Brent S

    Brent S Second Unit

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    They do own it. Universal restored the film in the early 1990s, and licensed it for some screenings on The Movie Channel and Cinemax. They even issued press notices promoting the cable premiere, with a "Stooges film not seen in over 50 years" angle. But they've kept it out of circulation for the past 20 years, reason(s) unknown. With one exception... clips of it with stars Ted Healy and Eddie Foy Jr. turned up in the movie theater scene of O BROTHER, WHERE ART THOU? (2000).
     

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