The Hobbit (merged thread)

Discussion in 'Movies' started by JohnE, Aug 4, 2002.

  1. RobertR

    RobertR Lead Actor

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    And are other directors following suit?
     
  2. TravisR

    TravisR Studio Mogul

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    I hated the 48 fps because it made the movie look like a video game cut scene (especially the shots that were all CG) but when I was leaving the theater I heard a couple of guys saying how much they "liked the new movie process that they used". Obviously, that's not a scientific sampling but even online, I've seen far more positive reaction than negative. I'm sure that 48 fps will eventually become the standard so my hope is that Jim Cameron figures out how to do it right and not have everything appear as a PlayStation 4 game.
     
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  3. Carlo Medina

    Carlo Medina Executive Producer

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    I think one of the things that contributes to the "video game cut scene" feel (which I totally agree with) is that 48fps adds a hyper-real look to things. 24fps can sort of mask things, making CGI blend more seamlessly into real footage. I think 48fps tends to reveal CGI for what it is more than 24fps. And Hobbit being very CGI heavy (and I'm going to guess Avatar 2-3 will as well) that explains the video game look that it was given.

    At home, when I enable my LED TV's 120hz capability (which I normally keep off) yes it makes the live-action footage of a baseball game, TV show, etc. look hyper-real (for lack of a better word) but it doesn't look as video game like as The Hobbit did in theaters.

    Perhaps if more films that are less reliant on CGI are shot in 48fps it will ease the visual transition of moviegoers into the format?
     
  4. Emanuel1

    Emanuel1 Agent

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    In The Hobbit, why do you think Bilbo was chosen to go with the dwarves to recover the treasure?
     
  5. Neil Middlemiss

    Neil Middlemiss Producer
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    It seems like you have a school or college assignment (given this question and the other a page or two back) based in the book and are looking for help in this thread, right?
     
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  6. Aaron Silverman

    Aaron Silverman Executive Producer

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    Because the Oracle prophesied that Morpheus would find him.
     
  7. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
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    Maybe because he was the greatest little hobbit of them all.

     
  8. Sean Bryan

    Sean Bryan Sean Bryan
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    Happy Birthday, Bilbo and Frodo!
     
  9. DavidJ

    DavidJ Producer
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    We saw the 3D trailer before Gravity last night and I'm hopeful that it will be good. They seem to be going a little overboard with the 3D and I did notice that 3D wasn't quite as effective as it was at 48fps. Even so, I preferred the first one in non-HFR. Our visual systems expect motion blur-it's there in real life too-and when it's minimized too much it looks artificial.
     
  10. Wayne_j

    Wayne_j Screenwriter

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    The extended cut is now out on iTunes.
     
  11. SamT

    SamT Cinematographer

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    Any detailed list of the changes?
     
  12. Wayne_j

    Wayne_j Screenwriter

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  13. SamT

    SamT Cinematographer

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    Thanks. The beginning of the movie was perfect by not showing Smaug. They shouldn't add more of him especially a shot showing his full body.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Brandon Conway

    Brandon Conway captveg

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    EXTENDED EDITION - The 13 additional minutes are there for serious fans only and simply allow for more experiences on this visit to Middle-Earth. I suspect anyone with misgivings about Jackson's indulgences of the like in the theatrical cut will continue to have them here. As for me, this still remains a wondrous picture. 10/10
     
  15. Virgoan

    Virgoan Second Unit

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    As was true of all the extended cuts of the LOTR trilogy, the extended edition of "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" is more satisfying than the theatrical cut. The scenes added actually "add" relevant information and atmosphere to the film.
     
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  16. Virgoan

    Virgoan Second Unit

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    Gandalf answered that question when Lady Galadriel asked why the halfling was part of the company. Gandalf explained that Saruman believes that evil can be fought by powerful people (wizards, elves and men). But Gandalf confesses he has always felt it is the gentle folk in the world who can endure and stave off evil by the simple process of love. Hobbits love simple things and they are extremely devoted to their companions.
     
  17. SamT

    SamT Cinematographer

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    Not seen it yet but I can believe that. I remember FOTR EE actually felt shorter to me and the original cut felt too long.
     
  18. Jeff Cooper

    Jeff Cooper Screenwriter

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    I just watched the EE last night. This shot you mention lasts less than a second, and you can only see the full body really by freeze framing as the screenshot above is.

    Seems like the most minor of nitpicks to point out.
     
  19. Sean Bryan

    Sean Bryan Sean Bryan
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    I'm happy to hear that The Desolation of Smaug seems to be getting lots of good reviews. Here's a very positive sampling (all spoiler free)http://www.comicbookmovie.com/fansites/JoshWildingNewsAndReviews/news/?a=91155While An Unexpected Journey had plenty of bucolic charm, it did, for a Middle-earth film, feel oddly inconsequential. The Desolation Of Smaug remedies that. Moody, urgent and, for want of a better word, Ringsier, it’s a much more satisfying film. If anything, it dispenses with early events with something approaching impatience: Beorn (Mikael Persbrandt), the aforementioned bear-man, is left behind before we’ve really had a chance to savour his peculiar brand of beastly intensity (though no doubt he’ll be back to claw up baddies in the Battle Of Five Armies), and the same goes for Mirkwood’s hallucinatory boughs, which have the company tripping balls in a variety of amusing ways. Middle-earth's got its mojo back. A huge improvement on the previous instalment, this takes our adventurers into uncharted territory and delivers spectacle by the ton. And in case you were wondering, yes, someone manages to say the title as dialogue.SOURCE: Empire The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug is a rollicking piece of epic entertainment, superior to its predecessor technically and dramatically. It atones for the rather lackluster first film, and generates excitement for next year's concluding chapter of the trilogy, The Hobbit: There And Back Again. If you were disappointed with The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey then The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug is the film you've been waiting for. It's a breathlessly told, action-packed crowd-pleaser that restores the luster of the saga for those underwhelmed by its predecessor and leaves you excited for the final chapter in the trilogy.SOURCE: IGN The Desolation of Smaug is a cheerfully entertaining and exhilarating adventure tale, a supercharged Saturday morning picture: it's mysterious and strange and yet Jackson also effortlessly conjures up that genial quality that distinguishes The Hobbit from the more solemn Rings stories. The absurdity is winning: you're laughing with, not laughing at. For me, it never sagged once in its mighty two hour 40 minutes running time and the high-frame-rate projection for this film somehow looks richer and denser than it did the last time around. Maybe I'm just getting used to it. Jackson has shown that he is an expert in big-league popular movie-making to rival Lucas and Spielberg. His Smaug, with its fight scenes, chase spectaculars, creepy creatures and secret stone doors opening with a grinding noise, is something to set alongside the Indiana Jones films. SOURCE: The Guardian Nearly everything about "The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" represents an improvement over the first installment of Peter Jackson's three-part adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien's beloved creation. Beginning with the blessing of not being stuck with a bunch of hungry and thirsty dwarves in Bilbo Baggins' hut for a half-hour at the outset, nearly everything about The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug represents an improvement over the first installment of Peter Jackson's three-part adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien's beloved creation. The “unexpected journey” launched in last Christmas' box-office behemoth becomes the heart of the matter this time around, making for plenty of peril, warfare, theme-park-ride-style escapes and little-guy courage. For Jackson and Warner Bros., it's another movie, another billion.SOURCE: The Hollywood Reporter The tone is one hundred percent Jackson – a kind of thundering gloominess, cut with the occasional glint of Discworld mischief. Jackson and his co-writers, Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, have decapitated bodies twitching on the ground, and a captured dwarf leering at a female elf: “Aren’t you going to search me? I could have anything down my trousers.” Maybe this really is what a lot of people want to see from a film version of The Hobbit, but let’s at least accept that Tolkien would probably not have been among them.SOURCE: The Telegraph Clearer and more engaging than its predecessor, this second installation in the “Hobbit” trilogy deftly brings out the human side of dwarves and elves while upping the action quotient. If “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” was a single-serving tribute to the fans of the J.R.R. Tolkien book that inspired it, its follow up, “The Desolation of Smaug,” offers a nod to the uninitiated moviegoing audiences that made a prequel trilogy possible. Eschewing the kitchen-sink THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUGminutiae of the first installment (or maybe just having used all of it up) Peter Jackson creates a rousing, immersive sequel that offers the same sort of sweeping action — and more crucially, emotional engagement — that helped the “Rings” films become a cultural phenomenon, regardless whether or not you were familiar with the source material.SOURCE: The Wrap Fans of the book will be awaiting several key episodes that serve as highlights: a brief stop-off for breakfast with skin-changing bear-man Beorn, a run-in with the spiders of Mirkwood, the rollercoaster barrel escape (which was originally intended to close the first act). Jackson’s eye for inventive action is undiminished, and when he gets a set-piece in full flow, there are few who can match him for breathless originality. Despite suffering from middle-act wobbles, The Desolation Of Smaug nevertheless delivers rousing action, incredible visuals and one stupendous dragon.SOURCE: Total Film If “An Unexpected Journey” felt like nearly three hours’ worth of throat clearing and beard stroking, the saga gets fully under way at last in “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug,” the similarly massive but far more purposeful second chapter in Peter Jackson’s latest Tolkien enterprise. Actually shorter than the first film by nine minutes, this robust, action-packed adventure benefits from a headier sense of forward momentum and a steady stream of 3D-enhanced thrills — culminating in a lengthy confrontation with a fire-breathing, scenery-chewing dragon — even as our heroes’ quest splits into three strands that are left dangling in classic middle-film fashion. Jackson’s gargantuan undertaking can still feel like completist overkill at times, but that won’t keep the Middle-earth enthusiasts who pushed the first “Hobbit” film past the $1 billion mark worldwide from doing the same with this Dec. 13 release, which should see Warners’ and MGM’s coffers overflow like
     
  20. Emanuel1

    Emanuel1 Agent

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    What are references mentioned in the first Lord of the Ring from The Hobbit book?
     

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